Giving blood does it make a difference?

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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 2 years ago
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I know this will be controversial but I was wondering if anyone could challenge me here because I was giving blood for a while and suddenly stopped.

The reason being is that almost every time I have gone to give blood they have never had walk in appointments available it happens but not often.

I have noticed that if I dont give blood someone else will and if I give blood someone else wont be able to.

So the effect is the same it is neutral, short of free health screenings arguably I don't see what benefit me going has anymore they get the same amount of blood whether i donate or not.

I am blood type A+ which is not a super rare type or a super useful type.

so how does me giving blood make a difference?
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cat_mac
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You personally giving blood won’t make much difference. Who gives the blood isn’t important, the quantity of blood donated is what matters. So if you personally stop giving blood, it won’t change anything. But if lots of people stop giving blood because they personally aren’t making a huge difference then that will have a negative impact. (RE appointments: making appointments would stop massive lines and a long waiting time, so that’s probably why they don’t always have walk in appointments I guess. It would depend on how busy they are.)

Giving blood isn’t about you, it’s about the people who need donated blood to survive.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by cat_mac)
You personally giving blood won’t make much difference. Who gives the blood isn’t important, the quantity of blood donated is what matters. So if you personally stop giving blood, it won’t change anything. But if lots of people stop giving blood because they personally aren’t making a huge difference then that will have a negative impact. (RE appointments: making appointments would stop massive lines and a long waiting time, so that’s probably why they don’t always have walk in appointments I guess. It would depend on how busy they are.)

Giving blood isn’t about you, it’s about the people who need donated blood to survive.
well yeah I don't give blood for my own benefit when I go. I hate needles. just when I give blood I like to think it is having a net positive effect on society otherwise I am not motivated to.
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DrawTheLine
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It makes a difference because your blood will be used to save someone's life. What if suddenly lots of people need A+ blood but nobody has donated because "someone else will"? People die. I wish I could donate blood but my veins are too small and they can't be found.
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username2752874
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(Original post by Anonymous)
well yeah I don't give blood for my own benefit when I go. I hate needles. just when I give blood I like to think it is having a net positive effect on society otherwise I am not motivated to.
Trust me, if lots of educated scientists, doctors and nurses encourage you to give blood, I'm sure it's providing a benefit.

Anyway, more blood means they can be more liberal with its use. For example, if you haemorrhaged blood, they won't transfuse you enough to be cured of anaemia, they might leave you at a Haemoglobin level of 9 g/dL where you need to be around 13-18.

So, maybe not save lives, but help someone get healthier faster
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TomW624
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Also remember a lot of people only donate blood during a crisis such as a natural disaster and not at any other time. This is great and all but blood unfortunately does have a shelf life and a lot of what is donated in these crisis is actually wasted. It's much better to regularly donate blood as it keeps stocks up and reduces the likelihood of running out, even if you have the most common blood type.
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Kater Murr
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I was told by one of the nurse's at the donor clinic here that even if your blood doesn't go to a patient via transfusion, it still gets used for various things including research etc. They actually freeze some of it. So it does all go to good use. And, sure, if you don't take up one of those appointments it sounds like, at your clinic, somebody else will, but the fact that that other person is going today means they're not going tomorrow, etc.

Basically your argument kind of sounds like a pro-vegetarian saying they'd only go vegetarian if everyone else did. Or, you know, a hitman saying that it's ethically OK to kill someone because if they didn't, someone else would simply do it anyway.
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junior.doctor
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All blood types are needed and useful. It's not only the rarer types that are needed. Common blood types are common amongst people who need blood, and therefore larger stocks of the more common blood types are needed, and so more donors are needed with the commoner blood types.
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