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They don't accept my voluntary work watch

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    (Original post by tashkent46)
    We are on the advent of driverless cars and a small admin team sorting through 100 applications is considered an impossibility? With all the unemployed in this country surely that would be welcome labour.
    Except from the companies who are trying to cut cost at every avenue. Employing people for an admin task they're not obliged to do and serves little to no purpose is the absolute definition of a waste of money.

    May I ask where you work and what minimum wage jobs you have done, it is surprisingly how competitive the job market can be in a surprisingly first world country.
    Where I work now is hugely irrelevant, but I've worked minimum wage jobs in 7 different countries and 4 or 5 different sectors, including retail and leisure.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Except from the companies who are trying to cut cost at every avenue. Employing people for an admin task they're not obliged to do and serves little to no purpose is the absolute definition of a waste of money.



    Where I work now is hugely irrelevant, but I've worked minimum wage jobs in 7 different countries and 4 or 5 different sectors, including retail and leisure.
    Perhaps the state should intervene then, if it is too much overhead for small business. There are other measures of wealth than just money, being able to get stable employment is surely one of them.

    7 countries, 5 sectors, that's impressive. Do you work in the UK? Perhaps the job market is different abroad, I wouldn't be surprised if here they told you your experience is too varied and you wouldn't be considered a stable enough employee! It really is a bit of a joke.
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    Hard to say, as we only have your word for it that this was the reason.
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    (Original post by tashkent46)
    Perhaps the state should intervene then, if it is too much overhead for small business. There are other measures of wealth than just money, being able to get stable employment is surely one of them.

    7 countries, 5 sectors, that's impressive. Do you work in the UK? Perhaps the job market is different abroad, I wouldn't be surprised if here they told you your experience is too varied and you wouldn't be considered a stable enough employee! It really is a bit of a joke.
    Nothing wrong with the current situation. What you're suggesting won't change anything; people are still not getting the job, the vast majority don't care why - especially when it comes to minimum wage jobs - they'll just move on to the next.
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    Thank you for all your responses and comments guys!

    I told them I've been volunteering at a charity shop for the last 6 months then they said "when was your last paid job" I said in June 16.

    They even said do I drive and they said yes.

    However this is a parcel sorter job and they need many people.

    And I'm a male who drives. Since some of their parcels may be heavy.

    I was going a job which was un paid but they did not take me further because it wasn't a paid job.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    they did not take me further because it wasn't a paid job.
    Did they actually say that, or are you inferring that?
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    The key word is they only accept people who were in paid work.

    I doubt they care less if you worked in a warehouse or office before.

    They turned me down because I was doing a job which was un paid, not because it was not relevant to parcel sorting.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thank you for all your responses and comments guys!

    I told them I've been volunteering at a charity shop for the last 6 months then they said "when was your last paid job" I said in June 16.

    They even said do I drive and they said yes.

    However this is a parcel sorter job and they need many people.

    And I'm a male who drives. Since some of their parcels may be heavy.

    I was going a job which was un paid but they did not take me further because it wasn't a paid job.
    I’m sorry but anyone who is justifying the behaviour of the employer is a moron - paid or unpaid work in reference to parcel sorting is irrelevant, it’s still a job, you still have to have all the traits of someone working in a paid position. They just sound like people who want their job to be soft after, even though it’s the most basic run of the mill job you can get - they sound like idiots to work for.
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    paid or unpaid work in reference to parcel sorting is irrelevant
    It's not, actually.

    A lot of unpaid / charity work is done on a casual or voluntary basis, where the worker may be able to come and go as they please as there's no firm requirement on them.

    Paid work is usually a lot more structured and rigid than this, requiring people to turn up on time and abide to a set amount of hours.

    It could well be that this employer has had trouble with workers in the past who haven't turned up when they said they would, and therefore put this limit in place.

    It doesn't make them bad people or bad employers.
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    (Original post by Lily048)
    you still have to have all the traits of someone working in a paid position.
    This is simply untrue. Unpaid volunteers can, and do, dip in and out of work without compunction - the need for them is, by definition, greater than their need for the role. I don't say they all do that (they don't) but a significant proportion do and thus unpaid work is a poor model for paid work where reliability is required.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    It's not, actually.

    A lot of unpaid / charity work is done on a casual or voluntary basis, where the worker may be able to come and go as they please as there's no firm requirement on them.

    Paid work is usually a lot more structured and rigid than this, requiring people to turn up on time and abide to a set amount of hours.

    It could well be that this employer has had trouble with workers in the past who haven't turned up when they said they would, and therefore put this limit in place.

    It doesn't make them bad people or bad employers.
    Yet voluntary works would seem to suggest the opposite work ethic - working for free instead of working for a wage. Surely if you can be bothered to turn up for free it's more reliable than someone who is doing it for their daily bread yet cba?
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    (Original post by tashkent46)
    Yet voluntary works would seem to suggest the opposite work ethic - working for free instead of working for a wage. Surely if you can be bothered to turn up for free it's more reliable than someone who is doing it for their daily bread yet cba?
    It doesn't, no, for the reasons mentioned in both mine and Good Bloke's posts.
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    (Original post by tashkent46)
    Yet voluntary works would seem to suggest the opposite work ethic - working for free instead of working for a wage. Surely if you can be bothered to turn up for free it's more reliable than someone who is doing it for their daily bread yet cba?
    No. Lack of payment merely shows who holds the whip hand and makes no comment on reliability. I work with volunteers and they are dreadfully unreliable - because they can be and get away with it.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Did they actually say that, or are you inferring that?
    If I said it was a paid job they would have told to come in and register and put on an induction.

    In the voluntary job I have to turn up on time, do the duties, pick up furniture, have good team work and communication skills.

    The parcel sorting job one of the most basic jobs you can get as another user has stated.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    If I said it was a paid job they would have told to come in and register and put on an induction.

    In the voluntary job I have to turn up on time, do the duties, pick up furniture, have good team work and communication skills.

    The parcel sorting job one of the most basic jobs you can get as another user has stated.
    You might well have done. But plenty don't and because you're associated with that sector you get treated the same way.

    Next time say it was paid.
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    BTW,

    They say for the first 12 weeks I go on minimum wage and after that my wages increase.

    I'm sure they are lying when they say after 12 weeks your wages go from
    £7 something to £10 something.

    They are lying since I read a review somewhere that after 12 weeks they:

    Only give you one day a week to work for AND they recruit new people to work 12 weeks and so on so forth.
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    Btw it was an agency who recruits people to work for that parcel sorting company.

    Im sure they only give people one say a week after 12 weeks because they need money.
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    Day* sorry not say.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    It's not, actually.

    A lot of unpaid / charity work is done on a casual or voluntary basis, where the worker may be able to come and go as they please as there's no firm requirement on them.

    Paid work is usually a lot more structured and rigid than this, requiring people to turn up on time and abide to a set amount of hours.

    It could well be that this employer has had trouble with workers in the past who haven't turned up when they said they would, and therefore put this limit in place.

    It doesn't make them bad people or bad employers.
    Makes them pretty illogical though.
    Voluntary workers arent usually as casual as you suggest because there would be chaos otherwise. I'm not having it that because workers are paid they somehow work harder or are more disciplined or skilled.
    Voluntary workers are often more dedicated because they have go off their backsides and volunteered.

    For a sorting job then I think its a stupid distinction.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    No it isn't. Discrimination is making a decision based upon information. Some types of discrimination (not employing someone because of skin colour, sex etc) is illegal. Most kinds of discrimination are not illegal. In fact, they are necessary and helpful. You are confusing 'discrimination' with 'illegal discrimination'.

    For instance, you would not cross the road in front of n approaching car. This is an example of discrimination on your part that is helpful. Employers seek to discriminate between potential employees on the basis of the likely aptitude and reliability. This is, again, useful discrimination.

    OP, this is discrimination on the part of the employer but it is not anything to do with a protected characteristic and is therefore perfectly legal. It could be that the employer has had bad experiences with charity volunteers in the past and now shies away from them, or it could be that they seek relevant experience in the same area of work, not just work of any sort.
    When used in plain English, that is without context, your definition of discrimination is correct. However the basic definition of a word changes due to the context of a situation, for example the word bank means different things and becomes a noun or a verb in different contexts. In this instance, we have been given context. A person has said that they have been discriminated against for not having the required experience for a position. In this case, we can say that the phrase discriminated against clearly is meaning ‘acting upon a presupposed prejudice’. Not the wider definition. When in contexts such as this, implying what you called illegal discrimination, then we don’t bother using the word illegal before it because everyone should know what kind of discrimination is being suggested.
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