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    Please can someone explain to me in simpler terms how a beta particle is formed? It says this in the text book, but i didn't really understand it: 'The electrons that are beta particles come from the nuclei of atoms when a neutron transforms into a proton. Beta particles do not ionise the atoms as they leave them.'

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    (Original post by datters)
    Please can someone explain to me in simpler terms how a beta particle is formed? It says this in the text book, but i didn't really understand it: 'The electrons that are beta particles come from the nuclei of atoms when a neutron transforms into a proton. Beta particles do not ionise the atoms as they leave them.'

    Thank you!
    A neutron splits into a proton and electron. The electron is the beta particle. Due to its negligible mass, the atomic mass of the atom doesn't change. Because of the proton produced, the proton number increases by one due to the loss of a negative charge (the electron). The atom isn't ionised, because it actually becomes a new element, and doesn't add or remove any electrons from the electron shells.

    Hope that helped, if you need anything else, just ask!
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    (Original post by Mehru1214)
    A neutron splits into a proton and electron. The electron is the beta particle. Due to its negligible mass, the atomic mass of the atom doesn't change. Because of the proton produced, the proton number increases by one due to the loss of a negative charge (the electron). The atom isn't ionised, because it actually becomes a new element, and doesn't add or remove any electrons from the electron shells.

    Hope that helped, if you need anything else, just ask!
    If that electron shoots off and now you have an extra proton, wouldn't be an ion as by definition, there's a net charge?
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    Simply put, the atom/nucleus is attempting to become stable via changing a neutron to a proton. Why/how it does this doesn't really matter. Whenever this happens an electron is given off by the change
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    (Original post by Mehru1214)
    A neutron splits into a proton and electron. The electron is the beta particle. Due to its negligible mass, the atomic mass of the atom doesn't change. Because of the proton produced, the proton number increases by one due to the loss of a negative charge (the electron). The atom isn't ionised, because it actually becomes a new element, and doesn't add or remove any electrons from the electron shells.

    Hope that helped, if you need anything else, just ask!
    Thank you very much! I think I understand it now
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    (Original post by HolyDiver)
    Simply put, the atom/nucleus is attempting to become stable via changing a neutron to a proton. Why/how it does this doesn't really matter. Whenever this happens an electron is given off by the change
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    (Original post by thekidwhogames)
    If that electron shoots off and now you have an extra proton, wouldn't be an ion as by definition, there's a net charge?
    No, because this is concerning the nucleus. Ionisation by definition only occurs when electrons are added or removed from the electron shells.
 
 
 
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