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Badboymk786
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The golf club is in contact with the golf ball for 1.8 ms and exerts a force of 1500 N on the golf ball.
The mass of the gold ball is 0.045 kg.
Calculate the velocity of the golf ball as it leaves the golf club.
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ErwinRommel
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use ke=1/2mv^2 rearrange for V

i think , im not sure how the 1.8ms factors in try that and check the markscheme.
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Badboymk786
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Lol if i had the mark schemes I wouldn't be asking but yh thx I'll try that out
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amzyrads
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(Original post by Badboymk786)
The golf club is in contact with the golf ball for 1.8 ms and exerts a force of 1500 N on the golf ball.
The mass of the gold ball is 0.045 kg.
Calculate the velocity of the golf ball as it leaves the golf club.
Consider The impulse which is force ×time
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in a fish bowl
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Force x time = Impulse which is a change in momentum. You can then use this to find the velocity (as you know the ball's initial momentum is 0)

1500 x 1.8 x 10^-3 = 0.045v
v = (1500 x 1.8 x 10^-3)/0.045 = 60 ms^-1
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Badboymk786)
The golf club is in contact with the golf ball for 1.8 ms and exerts a force of 1500 N on the golf ball.
The mass of the gold ball is 0.045 kg.
Calculate the velocity of the golf ball as it leaves the golf club.
The pedantic answer is that velocity is a vector, so you don't have enough information. Yes, I did drive my Physics teacher mad ..

Otherwise, impulse is the easiest approach.
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Badboymk786
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(Original post by in a fish bowl)
Force x time = Impulse which is a change in momentum. You can then use this to find the velocity (as you know the ball's initial momentum is 0)

1500 x 1.8 x 10^-3 = 0.045v
v = (1500 x 1.8 x 10^-3)/0.045 = 60 ms^-1
Why do u times by the 10^-3?
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jazzieb
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(Original post by Badboymk786)
Why do u times by the 10^-3?
Had this exact question in my physics mock last week! That's the same as dividing by 1000, which converts from ms (as in the question) to seconds which you need to work out the velocity.
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Badboymk786
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(Original post by jazzieb)
Had this exact question in my physics mock last week! That's the same as dividing by 1000, which converts from ms (as in the question) to seconds which you need to work out the velocity.
Thx
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Prozzyfeeler97
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So what’s the ****ing answer then?
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