The Student Room Group

CHemistry

1.In the the topic Redox and electrode potentials in my A2 book, it says electrochemical cells are made up of electrodes
E.g copper electrode and zinc electrode
What are electrodes?

2. It also says you have electrodes made up of platinum and graphite? What does this mean?

3. And I don't understand this piece of text
''You can also use non-metals, like chlorine or hydrogen, as reactants in electrochemical cells. For systems involving gas, the gas can be bubbled over an inert electrode (E.g platinum electrode) sitting in a solution of its aqueous ions (E.g. Cl - or H + ). ''

4. Cell potential means the voltage between two half-cells in an electrochemical cell.
What does voltage mean here?
(edited 6 years ago)
Original post by chemquestion
1.In the the topic Redox and electrode potentials in my A2 book, it says electrochemical cells are made up of electrodes
E.g copper electrode and zinc electrode
What are electrodes?

2. It also says you have electrodes made up of platinum and graphite? What does this mean?

3. And I don't understand this piece of text
''You can also use non-metals, like chlorine or hydrogen, as reactants in electrochemical cells. For systems involving gas, the gas can be bubbled over an inert electrode (E.g platinum electrode) sitting in a solution of its aqueous ions (E.g. Cl - or H + ). ''

4. Cell potential means the voltage between two half-cells in an electrochemical cell.
What does voltage mean here?


1. "electrode" is the technical term for the part of an electrochemical cell at which chemical reactions take place, both in electrolytic and voltaic cells.

2&3. These electrodes can be inert, such as graphite or platinum, or active such as copper. Platinum has the added advantage of acting as a catalytic surface for some redox processes.

4. "Voltage" is the electromotive force that the electrons experience that push and pull (or try to) the electrons around the external circuit. Electical current is the actual flow of charge (carried by electrons) and this is pulled around the circuit by the potential difference that exists between the electrodes, or provided by an external power source.

Voltage = electromotive force(EMF) = pòtential difference
The voltage of an electrode is the PD between it an a standard hydrogen electrode (SHE).
Reply 3
Original post by Old man1234
The voltage of an electrode is the PD between it an a standard hydrogen electrode (SHE).


I think its a bit late now mate.:u:

Quick Reply

Latest