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    I'm planning on doing my dissertation on the rise of the Men's Rights Movement.

    Seems that it is really taking off as a counterweight to feminism. Cassie Jaye's documentary from 2016 ( The Red Pill) was the catalyst for my interest. I recommend it highly.

    Wondering what everyone else thinks of it though and especially what you think the MRM can change in the future.
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    What subject is it for?
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    I prefer the purple pill, personally.
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    Politics degree.

    Was going to do IT until I saw the Red Pill.
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    Community Assistant
    Moved to society
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    Good luck. You've chosen a treaturous path for yourself, one that is full of hurdles....but you are not alone. Many, many, many women and men are going red pill! I'm not an MRA but I'm sympathetic to the MRM's cause. Despite all the efforts by institutionalised feminism to curtail this movement's advances its become huge and its growing still more and more day by day. There's no stopping this train.

    A lot of things need changing in society. A lot of damage caused by feminism since the 60s needs to be reversed. Here in this country for example, thanks to feminist policies introduced in the late 80s, divorced men became denied their right to their children whilst women were given automatic rights to their children. This has lead to many men loosing contact with their children. This of course needs to change. Sexual harassment is a huge topic nowadays. There is a strong culture in this country that encourages young boys to celebrate their sexual abuse at the hands of older women. A culture that trivialises, justifies and promotes sexual violence against men and boys. This culture needs to be challenged. One side effect of this culture is the issue that women cannot be charged with rape in this country thanks to a sexist definition for rape that excludes them from prosecution for this crime. This has been the case for almost 150 years now. This of course needs changing as well. Men are exploited and harshly treated by a highly gynocentric family courts system that needs a complete overhaul. Our education system is extremely sexist and bias against men. We need to get rid of gender quotas. We need to stop sexist spending policies in education and all other areas of life. We need to challenge the myth propagated by feminists that men are privileged. We need to challenge the idea that women's lives are more important and valuable than those of men which has lead societies to ignoring men in favour of women in all aspects of life from homelessness to suicide where men suffer great disadvantage. In poverty stricken countries boys as young as 5 are made to work the streets to provide for their mothers and send their sisters to school whilst denied that right themselves. Many tens of thousands of them die every year without a care from our world. This needs to change. Men are burdened with the harshest repsonbiltiies and exposed to the greatest risks by society. So society must cater to this increased burden ...i.e. more spending, services for men etc...etc etc etc etc.

    If you are interested - book recommendations:

    1. A brief History of The Men's Rights Movement From 1856 to Present by Peter Wright (£2 on amazon kindle!)
    2. Their Angry Creed by Herbert Purdy (£6 on amazon kindle)
    3. Red Pill Psychology: Psychology for men in a gynocentric world by Peter Wright. (£2 on amazon kindle)
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    Thanks for the book recommendations... I have an unused book token from Christmas to put to good use.

    Are there men's rights groups in the Universities? Don't mind taking a treacherous path as I have a thick skin, though some company would be nice.
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    Chaffers you are very brave.

    If you cover the subject with any sympathy towards the men's Rights Movement or just even handedly you are about to discover the true meaning of the lack of diversity of opinion n university.
    You are a Pioneer and I tip my hat to you.
    Well done.
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    (Original post by Chaffers2000)
    Politics degree.

    Was going to do IT until I saw the Red Pill.
    Shouldn’t you be doing something a little more academic? You’re writing a dissertation not a news article.
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    (Original post by Chaffers2000)
    Thanks for the book recommendations... I have an unused book token from Christmas to put to good use.

    Are there men's rights groups in the Universities? Don't mind taking a treacherous path as I have a thick skin, though some company would be nice.
    +1

    Sadly, most all universities do not have men's rights groups. No, most universities have refused to allow them thanks to opposition from feminist groups in universities and in the National Union of Students (NUS). Women have two or three roles representing their interests in the NUS. Men don't have any.

    (Pictures of "our representatives" in the NUS below)

    The current president of the NUS Shakira Marin: "I call myself a feminist" https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...class-feminism


    The current vice president of the NUS Emily Chapman. She's a volunteer at a Feminist Woman's Health Centre...



    and the rest:


    In all universities and in the NUS men are not allowed to vote or stand for many of these roles.

    These are the current leadership of the NUS. The voice for "all students" in higher education in the UK. All without a single exception beneficiaries of discriminatory NUS gender quotas and corrupt sexist systems for voting that ensure feminists and women reach positions of power and control irrespective of whether or not students vote for them. Corrupt systems of voting where one student is not equal to one vote. Racist, sexist systems of voting where your gender and the colour of your skin and your sexual orientation confer privileges on you. Rigged systems of voting where men are disallowed a vote and feminists and women are ensured a win.

    In this country, in the education system at least, democracy is just a facade. This is another example of a sexism against men that needs changing.

    Attempts to create a role representing men's interests in higher education have always been stifled by feminists within the NUS. Two recent examples being the university of Staffordshire, which had a male rights advocacy group blocked by a ‘woman’s network’ who called the idea of a men’s rights advocacy group ‘dangerous’. Another example is the university of Durham who’s student union blocked its male rights advocacy society, which was set up by a male student to raise awareness about male suicide after his friend killed himself, because it was ‘too controversial’. I think only one university thus far has beaten feminists in the union and managed to establish a role to represent men at the university level. That is Keele University. The student union initially rejected the idea of a men’s representative as being ‘not necessary’ and fought hard to abolish it but lost that fight to student vote at Keele. Still, the student union and the university only allowed this role to become established if it involved:

    “ending sexism against women”

    https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...representative

    Basically, the role of men’s representative at keele is nothing but a sexist extension of feminism and women’s interests.

    (Original post by Chaffers2000)
    though some company would be nice.
    If you need anything buzz yours truly.
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    I think a lot of the problem arises because MRAs mostly just talk about issues to shut down feminists. Like the latter says something and they pipe up "but what about homeless men". If they'd shut up and just get on with actually helping homeless men rather than using them as a point scorer, people might be more sympathetic.

    Anyway, you might want to explore "toxic masculinity". Often phrased as a problem for women, however, I think boys themselves lose out from it just as much. E.g. school performance: girls are chastised for misbehaving for having bad grades, so they study more, they behave. On the other hand "boys will be boys" and so boys don't learn to take school seriously (obviously these are generalizations that don't apply universally). There some evidence that girls do better in academia because they are better at following instructions. For example, more women in call centres, because call centres have instruction (to be crude one could say "girls are meek and compliant while boys are rebels") manuals that women follow more strictly. Flip side is that this means boys are bigger risk takers and might try things, and later in life, some of them become more successful for it. Bottom line, gender stereotypes hurt boys just as much as girls. I think that's something you could include.

    As an aside, you need to present alternative viewpoints. Especially in this day and age on this topic. It sounds like you are very supportive of this movement, which is fine, but don't forget to put in critiques, too, and alternative views. If not, I would bet your grade might suffer.
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    (Original post by yudothis)
    I think a lot of the problem arises because MRAs mostly just talk about issues to shut down feminists. Like the latter says something and they pipe up "but what about homeless men". If they'd shut up and just get on with actually helping homeless men rather than using them as a point scorer, people might be more sympathetic.
    But then they wouldn't be MRAs per se. There already exist charities and campaign groups dealing with most of the predominantly male problems that MRAs cite, like prostate cancer, homelessness, conscription, etc. You just rarely seem groups like Movember making what they do into an anti-feminist political strut.
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    didn't mra started as a joke in response to feminism (or feminazis before you take my head off) as a way to take the mickey out of them? i didn't know people took it seriously.
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    (Original post by num.7)
    didn't mra started as a joke in response to feminism (or feminazis before you take my head off) as a way to take the mickey out of them? i didn't know people took it seriously.
    Well, it's not meant as a joke by its proponents, but it's still not really taken seriously.
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    Watch The Red Pill and see if you still think it isn't taken seriously.

    The feminists who tried ( successfully in many cases) to shut down screenings across the world seemed to be taking it seriously. I certainly take it seriously, in fact I feel almost betrayed by not having known about it previously.

    It really is an eye opener... And merely the entry to the rabbit warren. For instance just found out that sperm counts are down 60% and men's testosterone levels down 30% in the West... And are continuing to decrease by 1% per year. I've never seen anything about this in the MSM.

    No-one seems to know why.

    The only reason I can think of for this not being an issue is that is a men's health problem, though on a biblical scale. Then again 14 of the top 15 biggest preventable killers are men's health issues too and all I see in the press is breast cancer, anorexia and other women's issues.

    One part of the film I thought they were maybe taking a bit too far was the disposability of males. The ex-feminist who argued that all successful cultures were built upon their blokes being disposable and the really shocking stuff about Boko haram.

    Not so sure now...
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    +1

    In all universities and in the NUS men are not allowed to vote or stand for many of these roles.
    Generally, there's no actual method of preventing them from voting, however. At my university, for instance, the only difference on the digital ballot for the LGBT officer compared to the non-sectional ones was a couple of sentences politely requesting that you refrain from voting if you didn't consider yourself LGBT.
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    (Original post by anarchism101)
    Generally, there's no actual method of preventing them from voting, however. At my university, for instance, the only difference on the digital ballot for the LGBT officer compared to the non-sectional ones was a couple of sentences politely requesting that you refrain from voting if you didn't consider yourself LGBT.
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    (Original post by CookieButter)
    And how would they know that you don't self-identify as a woman, unless you've voluntarily given them that information?
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    (Original post by anarchism101)
    And how would they know that you don't self-identify as a woman, unless you've voluntarily given them that information?
    Your student information at the university. This is the instruction that male students received in the elections this year. Anyone that isn’t female or does not “identify” as one at the university is prohibited from standing or voting for this post.
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    (Original post by CoolCavy)
    Moved to society
    Nice work officer Cavy.
 
 
 
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