Government and politics - what does this mean?

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T19991
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Could someone explain what "as a check on the power of the government" mean in any way.
For example Judiciary as a check on the power of the Government / Executive ?
What does as a check / curb on power mean exactly ?
My tutor has handed me a essay explaining about the judicial review process, human rights act and judicial inquiries etc - but could someone explain what "as a check on the power of the government / executive" mean for me to understand the question further
Thank you
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It's essentially a limitation or a restriction over the power of government - a way of one institution to prevent misuse of power by another institution.
In this case, the judiciary is curbing the power of government.
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T19991
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(Original post by Johnathan94)
It's essentially a limitation or a restriction over the power of government - a way of one institution to prevent misuse of power by another institution.
In this case, the judiciary is curbing the power of government.
Thank you!!
So it's practically the ways in which something is in more control over the government ?
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(Original post by T19991)
Thank you!!
So it's practically the ways in which something is in more control over the government ?
Yeah - although I'd be lying if I said I was completely confident in the way that you phrased it.

Think of it like this, whilst the government has the power to write the law (in theory) in Britain, it still does have an obligation to abide by that law as it stands at any moment.

Theresa May wanted the government to trigger Article 50 for example, but a prior piece of law stated that this actually had to be done in parliament. The case went to court, and she lost. In that instance, the judiciary is acting as a check (or curbing) the power of government.
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T19991
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(Original post by Johnathan94)
Yeah - although I'd be lying if I said I was completely confident in the way that you phrased it.

Think of it like this, whilst the government has the power to write the law (in theory) in Britain, it still does have an obligation to abide by that law as it stands at any moment.

Theresa May wanted the government to trigger Article 50 for example, but a prior piece of law stated that this actually had to be done in parliament. The case went to court, and she lost. In that instance, the judiciary is acting as a check (or curbing) the power of government.
Thank you! I understand it 100% now !
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