Edexcel Physics GCSE

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kat1ewild
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#1
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#1
Hi,

I’m really struggling with this question and I was wondering if someone could help.

Describe the processes which convert wave disturbances between sound waves and vibrations in solids, and

a) explain why such processes only work over a limited frequency range

b) use this to explain the way the human ear works
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CactusGirl01
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#2
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#2
Hey, I'll just take a look at your question and see if I can help
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CactusGirl01
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#3
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#3
Okay, sorry my laptop ran out of charge. I see what you mean that question seems very vague to me and I don't really understand what it is asking. Possibly they want you to mention that sound waves are longitudinal and that the vibrations are along the same direction as the wave transfers energy. Maybe talk about how sound waves travel faster through solids because they are more dense meaning the particles are closer together so the sound can be transfered faster? I am unsure about the frequency part for the question. I wouldn't want to tell you the wrong thing, possibly it is asking about the range of human hearing which is 20 to 20 000 Hz. UPDATE: I have just found a part of my textbook that I think may help you answer all three points to your question. Apologies if this doesn't help but I think I will type it out for you

Sound waves are longitudinal waves caused by vibrating objects. The vibrations are passed through the surrounding medium as a series of compressions.
The sound may eventually reach someone's eardrum, at which point the person might hear it. The human ear is capable of hearing sounds with frequencies between 20-20,000HZ
Because sound waves are caused by vibrating particles, the denser the medium, the faster the sound travels. Meaning you can't hear sound in a vacuum are there are no particles.
Sound generally travels faster in solids than liquids or gases because solids are the most dense.

I think this will probably help you answer your question. If not, possibly check the mark scheme if it's a past paper and write out the mark scheme answer to help yourself remember. Or if it's homework then email the teacher, go along to a help session or give it a go and tell them you couldn't do it. Best of luck )

quick question, are you doing your gcses this year? I am
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kat1ewild
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#4
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#4
Thank you so much! You’ve been really helpful.
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kat1ewild
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#5
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#5
No, I’m in year 10 so I’ve still got another year to go. But good luck!
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CactusGirl01
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#6
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#6
no problem, and good luck to you too. if you have any more questions feel free to ask me
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brainmaster
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#7
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#7
(Original post by CactusGirl01)
Okay, sorry my laptop ran out of charge. I see what you mean that question seems very vague to me and I don't really understand what it is asking. Possibly they want you to mention that sound waves are longitudinal and that the vibrations are along the same direction as the wave transfers energy. Maybe talk about how sound waves travel faster through solids because they are more dense meaning the particles are closer together so the sound can be transfered faster? I am unsure about the frequency part for the question. I wouldn't want to tell you the wrong thing, possibly it is asking about the range of human hearing which is 20 to 20 000 Hz. UPDATE: I have just found a part of my textbook that I think may help you answer all three points to your question. Apologies if this doesn't help but I think I will type it out for you

Sound waves are longitudinal waves caused by vibrating objects. The vibrations are passed through the surrounding medium as a series of compressions.
The sound may eventually reach someone's eardrum, at which point the person might hear it. The human ear is capable of hearing sounds with frequencies between 20-20,000HZ
Because sound waves are caused by vibrating particles, the denser the medium, the faster the sound travels. Meaning you can't hear sound in a vacuum are there are no particles.
Sound generally travels faster in solids than liquids or gases because solids are the most dense.

I think this will probably help you answer your question. If not, possibly check the mark scheme if it's a past paper and write out the mark scheme answer to help yourself remember. Or if it's homework then email the teacher, go along to a help session or give it a go and tell them you couldn't do it. Best of luck )

quick question, are you doing your gcses this year? I am
how different is GCSE and IGCSE
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CactusGirl01
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#8
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#8
@brainmaster hmmm im not entirely sure content wise. but igcse is international gcse whislt gcse is just ... gcse . basically igcse will be more widely recognised around the world because it is international whislt gcse isnt. i dont think content wise, igce and gce would be too different, you may want to look into that
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Napapijri
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#9
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#9
I'm doing my gcse this year and I was wondering if you had any recommendations for how to revise and what to revise?
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