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Is it too late for an Engineering Degree? watch

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    Foundation year or you can take A-Level Physics on a gap yah

    Prestige means nothing for engineering unlike Law
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    I guess you could but yeah Physics is mandatory. It's a shame because quite a few unis would actually let you in with just Maths and Physics as long as you did well (A* - A) in both.

    Also a tip: don't automatically go top russel group without research. UCL's mechanical engineering department isn't great as far as I've heard compared to Imperial/Bath etc.
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    (Original post by ~BrielleHoney~)
    I guess you could but yeah Physics is mandatory. It's a shame because quite a few unis would actually let you in with just Maths and Physics as long as you did well (A* - A) in both.

    Also a tip: don't automatically go top russel group without research. UCL's mechanical engineering department isn't great as far as I've heard compared to Imperial/Bath etc.
    UCL is strong for social sciences, law, humanities CS and obviously other things too but falls short on courses like Physics and Engineering, so yes this is a good point.

    To OP yes you could take the gap year and finish physics and do further maths. Cambridge and Imperial are much better than UCL for this course tbh, you could probably expect an offer from UCL if your grades are at least equal to the entry requirements this year. Imperial looks for further maths quite often even if its only desirable and not required, and for Cambridge just grades won't be enough.
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    If you're certain that Engineering is the course for you (which from what you've described it sounds like it is; sorry you weren't allowed to take Further Maths in the first place and was persuaded to drop something you enjoy..) then go for it - better now than realising this halfway through a law degree! Should definitely be achievable. Get those A/A*s, read up on the subject, and reapply
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    (Original post by ~BrielleHoney~)
    I guess you could but yeah Physics is mandatory. It's a shame because quite a few unis would actually let you in with just Maths and Physics as long as you did well (A* - A) in both.

    Also a tip: don't automatically go top russel group without research. UCL's mechanical engineering department isn't great as far as I've heard compared to Imperial/Bath etc.
    Yeah they all require Physics which is a real shame, and I get your point about the University choices, I just put some examples in, I haven't looked deeply into University choices apart from the entry requirements and course structures so just wanted to give some examples (I've heard UCL lacks in that department and Bath shines there).
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    (Original post by Appleorpear)
    UCL is strong for social sciences, law, humanities CS and obviously other things too but falls short on courses like Physics and Engineering, so yes this is a good point.

    To OP yes you could take the gap year and finish physics and do further maths. Cambridge and Imperial are much better than UCL for this course tbh, you could probably expect an offer from UCL if your grades are at least equal to the entry requirements this year. Imperial looks for further maths quite often even if its only desirable and not required, and for Cambridge just grades won't be enough.
    Thank you for your advice. Yeah, I realise this will be an upward hill battle which is why I need to be sure that the fact I've taken these two other A levels in addition to my other 3 won't disadvantage me and the universities will actually look at them in a respected manner. I also know that Imperial and Cambridge are the pinnacle institution for this course and it will be impossibly difficult to get there but that is where I would like to aim for.

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by randombiochemist)
    If you're certain that Engineering is the course for you (which from what you've described it sounds like it is; sorry you weren't allowed to take Further Maths in the first place and was persuaded to drop something you enjoy..) then go for it - better now than realising this halfway through a law degree! Should definitely be achievable. Get those A/A*s, read up on the subject, and reapply
    Thank you for your words of encouragement. Would I taking Further Maths and Physics in a Gap year be accepted by universities such as Imperial and Cambridge as a means to meet entry requirements and also develop my academics so I don't turn into a potato on my year out?
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    While it's largely been covered as above, there are plenty of foundation year course for engineering which is probably the "ideal" scenario. Southampton, Loughborough, Durham and Manchester all have such options to my knowledge, and are very highly regarded for engineering (both in academia and industry). Additionally, some engineering courses do not require Physics (I believe UCL Civil Engineering for example).

    For your latter point on Cambridge and Imperial, I'd advise getting in touch with them directly about your situation. They may have suggestions or requirements, particularly given the taking of the relevant subjects across two exam sittings. Best to be sure! Depending which branch of engineering you want to pursue, you may need to take chemistry or biology, I believe, for Imperial. I'm not 100% sure on that however.
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    (Original post by mah1000000)
    Thank you for your words of encouragement. Would I taking Further Maths and Physics in a Gap year be accepted by universities such as Imperial and Cambridge as a means to meet entry requirements and also develop my academics so I don't turn into a potato on my year out?
    To my knowledge (which may not be comprehensive) they don't mind at all whether you took a gap year (and whether you did additional A Levels during that year) as long as you've got all the qualifications required for the course. I'd say make your year productive and be prepared to explain your reasons - as you did above - for example at interviews to convince admissions tutors that you're truly committed to the subject.

    Might also be a good idea to ring up or email some Cambridge colleges / Imperial (why not Oxford Engineering Science too? ) for advice? All the best
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    (Original post by mah1000000)
    Thank you for your words of encouragement. Would I taking Further Maths and Physics in a Gap year be accepted by universities such as Imperial and Cambridge as a means to meet entry requirements and also develop my academics so I don't turn into a potato on my year out?
    Only way to know is to email the unis and ask
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    I would think a Foundation course specifically for Engineering might make more sense... I'm only saying this because I tried to self-study A-Levels, and because the natural science ones have practical components that you need to get someone to sign off on, it's nowhere near as simple as taking the maths exams as an independent candidate. I don't mean it's difficult - I'm sure the practical parts are easy - but I mean it's a massive pain to find a college that will do that for you (I couldn't, in the end) and almost all unis require the practical component.

    Though in the OP's case, maybe your old college would help you out with the practical part since they pressured you to drop it in the first place?
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    Doesn't Cambridge and other top unis prefer you to take your exams in one sitting e.g. over 2 years not 3?

    idk though and am probably completely wrong
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    (Original post by Bill Nye)
    Doesn't Cambridge and other top unis prefer you to take your exams in one sitting e.g. over 2 years not 3?

    idk though and am probably completely wrong
    Well yeah that's what I thought and why I made this post. But that statement is normally for candidates who have taken 3 years to complete their A levels. I would however complete my three A levels in a two year period and then take an additional two in the third year. Taking a higher quantity of A levels isn't normally beneficial but in my case of meeting the entry requirements they may see it as a circumstantial exception.
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    (Original post by Shishkabobs)
    I would think a Foundation course specifically for Engineering might make more sense... I'm only saying this because I tried to self-study A-Levels, and because the natural science ones have practical components that you need to get someone to sign off on, it's nowhere near as simple as taking the maths exams as an independent candidate. I don't mean it's difficult - I'm sure the practical parts are easy - but I mean it's a massive pain to find a college that will do that for you (I couldn't, in the end) and almost all unis require the practical component.

    Though in the OP's case, maybe your old college would help you out with the practical part since they pressured you to drop it in the first place?
    Yeah, I can talk to my Sixth form about doing the practical accreditation, I think they may take a lot of convincing but it is a possibility.

    On your other point as others have also pointed out Foundation years. I do not want to do a foundation year as I would much prefer self studying some A levels and then also having a year for work and leisure. Also, foundation years are as far as I know more designed for those who have been out of education for a while. Lastly a foundation course wouldn't be a route for me to get to Universities such as Cambridge / Imperial / Bath.
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    Everyone on here has already given you any advice I might've- I have to say though, I didn't do further maths and I've been accepted into the UK's top unis for engineering! (I mean in the top ten btw). If it's not too late, try doing an engineering summer school or two or an internship that will show your interest in engineering and prove that you actually know what engineering entails good luck!
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    *also there's an Oxford (not Brookes aha) foundation year which I don't think would look down on you for retaking a year to do the physics A-level. You only need AAB, but there are eligibility criteria. If you're interested just look up 'LMH foundation year' and check it out.
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    (Original post by rainabridget)
    *also there's an Oxford (not Brookes aha) foundation year which I don't think would look down on you for retaking a year to do the physics A-level. You only need AAB, but there are eligibility criteria. If you're interested just look up 'LMH foundation year' and check it out.
    Thanks but I'm not eligible for the foundation year.
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    (Original post by rainabridget)
    Everyone on here has already given you any advice I might've- I have to say though, I didn't do further maths and I've been accepted into the UK's top unis for engineering! (I mean in the top ten btw). If it's not too late, try doing an engineering summer school or two or an internship that will show your interest in engineering and prove that you actually know what engineering entails good luck!
    I know that Further Maths is not a requirement, but Physics is. The main question is whether the regular courses would accept these additional A levels.
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    (Original post by mah1000000)
    Yeah they all require Physics which is a real shame, and I get your point about the University choices, I just put some examples in, I haven't looked deeply into University choices apart from the entry requirements and course structures so just wanted to give some examples (I've heard UCL lacks in that department and Bath shines there).
    Why not look for a Foundation year; you could go to uni in September. You don't need F Maths for many Engineering courses. Look beyond RG to Bath, Brookes, Loughborough - all rated courses.
 
 
 
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