username3853668
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
The whole point of meiosis seems to be to produce haploid genetically different cells, and yet before all of the division occurs the parental chromosomes have fused unit on cell?

So what is the point of the process, where are the cells coming from and where do they go next?

Many thanks
0
reply
macpatgh-Sheldon
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
I am not sure what you mean by "fused unit on cell""; however, let me attempt to help you out.

Think of meiosis as having two sets of cell division (called Meiosis I and Meiosis II) - in the first cell division, the process is DIFFERENT from mitosis in that the CHROMATIDS of each chromosome DO NOT move apart from the equator, rather WHOLE CHROMOSOMES move apart, so that half the chromosomes go to one daughter cell, half to the other daughter cell. So Meiosis I results in the production of haploid cells - are you with me?

OK - let us go to next step:-

Then think of Meiosis II as being almost identical to mitosis - here the two daughter cells produced in Meiosis I [which are already haploid] each divide again to produce a total of four kinda "granddaughter" cells (MY TERMINOLOGY - don't write in exam haha!), each being haploid = has half the chromosome number (23 in humans).

Look at the summary on my attached Powerpoint file.

Hope this clarifies things for you!

M (specialist biology tutor)
Attached files
1
reply
username3853668
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by macpatelgh)
I am not sure what you mean by "fused unit on cell""; however, let me attempt to help you out.

Think of meiosis as having two sets of cell division (called Meiosis I and Meiosis II) - in the first cell division, the process is DIFFERENT from mitosis in that the CHROMATIDS of each chromosome DO NOT move apart from the equator, rather WHOLE CHROMOSOMES move apart, so that half the chromosomes go to one daughter cell, half to the other daughter cell. So Meiosis I results in the production of haploid cells - are you with me?

OK - let us go to next step:-

Then think of Meiosis II as being almost identical to mitosis - here the two daughter cells produced in Meiosis I [which are already haploid] each divide again to produce a total of four kinda "granddaughter" cells (MY TERMINOLOGY - don't write in exam haha!), each being haploid = has half the chromosome number (23 in humans).

Look at the summary on my attached Powerpoint file.

Hope this clarifies things for you!

M (specialist biology tutor)
Thank you so much, I think I meant to write for 'fused unit of cell' 'have formed a zygote'- typos sorry!
Very very useful thank you 😀😀😀
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you experienced financial difficulties as a student due to Covid-19?

Yes, I have really struggled financially (76)
17.92%
I have experienced some financial difficulties (123)
29.01%
I haven't experienced any financial difficulties and things have stayed the same (160)
37.74%
I have had better financial opportunities as a result of the pandemic (52)
12.26%
I've had another experience (let us know in the thread!) (13)
3.07%

Watched Threads

View All