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    Does anyone use their degrees (other than science degrees)? And is it easy to find work with a degree?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Does anyone use their degrees (other than science degrees)? And is it easy to find work with a degree?
    Remembering that a degree itself might not teach you useful technical knowledge, but gives you a number of different skills that you can use in a job. Presenting, teamwork etc. And it's about the experience you get outside a degree too.

    It feeels like the thing to go along with despite its stupid fees
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Does anyone use their degrees (other than science degrees)? And is it easy to find work with a degree?
    Yes. there is life beyond stem.
    Easy to find work, depends on degree and grade. To some extent the uni as well.
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    depends more on your ability to pass logical and numerical reasoning tests and group role play assessments during job interviews.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Does anyone use their degrees (other than science degrees)? And is it easy to find work with a degree?
    For me, hasn't been worth it, I'd even say I came away feeling lied to. Definitely did wonder what did I go to uni for post-graduation. I don't think my degree has helped me do anything post-uni and the 9 to 5 I had was for a position below what I trained for. The other job (where I would actually count as self-employed if I'm not mistaken) earns me more in a day (from 1.x times to many many times more) and doesn't need a degree, but it's infrequent so there's that. We'll see if my masters is useful once I finish.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Does anyone use their degrees (other than science degrees)? And is it easy to find work with a degree?
    It's no longer an easy route into the middle class, though if you look over a life time grads earn more than non-grads.

    I'd say it's no longer a case of doing any degree. While all degrees offer transferable skills this isn't enough anymore.

    If you want to make a healthy living your safest bet is to learn a trade, you'll amass more wealth than most grads by doing this.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    For me, hasn't been worth it, I'd even say I came away feeling lied to. Definitely did wonder what did I go to uni for post-graduation. I don't think my degree has helped me do anything post-uni and the 9 to 5 I had was for a position below what I trained for. The other job (where I would actually count as self-employed if I'm not mistaken) earns me more in a day (from 1.x times to many many times more) and doesn't need a degree, but it's infrequent so there's that. We'll see if my masters is useful once I finish.
    What course did you do? It would be interesting to hear what university as well if you want to say.

    There are huge numbers of graduates around and a Masters definitely helps and is almost essential in many areas.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Does anyone use their degrees (other than science degrees)? And is it easy to find work with a degree?
    Most people won't really use their degrees but they will take with them the life lessons, the memories, the stamp of approval for working towards something, the work ethic and the general skills that they have picked up by virtue of going to university. I see uni as an overall experience and transition period where you grow from an adolescent into an adult in a conducive environment to do so.

    Most grad employers rely on this view of university and thus don't have much in the way of direct subject or experience requirements. It's expected that you're supposed to grow, pick up skills and experience plus gain leadership throughout your time at uni which will then give an employer a baseline level to train you from.

    I'm of the opinion that you go to uni either a) to do a subject which directly leads to a career or b) do a subject you enjoy, but make the most of your time at university whilst working towards whatever goal you have (grad jobs, academia etc)

    If you don't really fall into either then unis probably not a good idea.

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    Following what others have said, I personally have learnt a lot in my degree/university in general, which includes life skills etc.

    But if I was to start again, I would've tried to get an apprenticeship at a big corporation as I feel I would've learnt the same amount academic wise.
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    I work in marketing and I use my media degree every day, it gave me loads of practical experience to know how to create the content I make in my job, and the critical thinking skills and confidence to progress in my career. I had to do a lot of additional work experience to get my foot in the door but luckily my uni provided this while I was studying so I got a job before finishing my third year. Everyone will have a different view depending on their own experience, and every industry is different so if you're unsure about whether to go to uni look at the sort of job you want and whether its the best route and what work you'd need to get there.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Does anyone use their degrees (other than science degrees)? And is it easy to find work with a degree?
    Not worth it, you cannot afford to buy a house, you have to live with parents for ever or rent a dirty flat shared with 7 girls and an endless amount of men from tinder visiting (so you have to put a lock on your door whenever you enter the kitchen) and drive a **** second hand car forever. I would strip if i could turn the clock back.
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    (Original post by Dignifieddeath)
    Not worth it, you cannot afford to buy a house, you have to live with parents for ever or rent a dirty flat shared with 7 girls and an endless amount of men from tinder visiting (so you have to put a lock on your door whenever you enter the kitchen) and drive a **** second hand car forever. I would strip if i could turn the clock back.
    Damn, it must be so easy to be a girl. I never got anywhere with online dating or Tinder. Not a single girl ever wanted to meet me. Yet below average girls can get men to meet them all the time.
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    (Original post by snowman77)
    Damn, it must be so easy to be a girl. I never got anywhere with online dating or Tinder. Not a single girl ever wanted to meet me. Yet below average girls can get men to meet them all the time.
    Most men will sleep with anything lol. I am a female and I promise you my life is anything but easy
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    (Original post by Dignifieddeath)
    Most men will sleep with anything lol. I am a female and I promise you my life is anything but easy
    It's easy in the dating sense, unless your standards are unrealistically high.

    Young, decent looking, middle class girls have it very easy in life.
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    (Original post by snowman77)
    Damn, it must be so easy to be a girl. I never got anywhere with online dating or Tinder. Not a single girl ever wanted to meet me. Yet below average girls can get men to meet them all the time.
    you just need to work on your game man, it's not that hard really.

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    I got a bachelors in electrical engineering in 1969. After joining a government organisation, and working for them for a year in the states, i went overseas. Even though i was merely a 'working level' engineer (not a highly paid manager), i managed to save enough dosh in 2 years overseas to buy a house in the D.C. area, when i returned in 1971. Since then, i have lived in 14 countries, using my engineering skills, and enjoying nearly every minute. After i returned from overseas, i managed engineering contracts mostly in the states. When i got a little ahead financially, i would buy a block of stock for my retirement. Without my engineering know-how, i would not have been able to do any of that, because i wouldn't have known how.

    Currently, i consult in satellite communications. I have two clients currently - both in Puerto Rico. Fortunately, i speak a little Spanish, which is very useful when i'm "on the ground" on the island. I interviewed 5 different groups of people [in 5 different professions], before i decided upon engineering as a career. I think i made the right shoice. Best of luck. Cheers.
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    Yeah, I use my Law degrees all the time, and I'm proud of what I went through to get them.
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    I'm stopping at HND but it's looking well worth it for me, I already had the industry exp and contacts, I just need to tick boxes now and i'm eligible for a couple of bumps up the ladder, and i'm coming into my industry at a good time. And i;d def learned more practical information than I would have through self study.
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    If money is what you want then entering a trade, becoming a master in that trade and setting up your own company will allow you to gain much more money than 90% of graduates. Only top grad's will surpass these earnings and they will be saddled with much more debt. University allows you time to focus on a subject you'll love and it's also a pretty unique experience. Is university overrated? Yes, massively, but is it still necessary for top professions? Yes. It really depends on what you want to do and how you want to do it.
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    (Original post by GapYaar)
    If money is what you want then entering a trade, becoming a master in that trade and setting up your own company will allow you to gain much more money than 90% of graduates. Only top grad's will surpass these earnings and they will be saddled with much more debt. University allows you time to focus on a subject you'll love and it's also a pretty unique experience. Is university overrated? Yes, massively, but is it still necessary for top professions? Yes. It really depends on what you want to do and how you want to do it.
    Agreed, down the line however most trade jobs will become autonomous.
 
 
 
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