username1987655
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Does anyone have any ideas on how to compare the flea by John Donne and Atonement by Ian McEwan?

Thanks in advance
0
reply
NMauger96
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
Sorry, I don’t know how to compare these but I have found a couple of summaries for these poems which may inspire you!
http://m.sparknotes.com/poetry/donne/section3/
http://www.supersummary.com/atonement/summary/
0
reply
username1987655
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by NMauger96)
Sorry, I don’t know how to compare these but I have found a couple of summaries for these poems which may inspire you!
http://m.sparknotes.com/poetry/donne/section3/
http://www.supersummary.com/atonement/summary/
Thank you anyway!
0
reply
Lit teacher
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by MediaROCKS)
Does anyone have any ideas on how to compare the flea by John Donne and Atonement by Ian McEwan?

Thanks in advance
Not obvious texts for comparison, so this should be an interesting challenge. There is a theme in both of love, at times forbidden or illicit. Donne refers to there being no loss of honour, although her parents would disagree.
Robbie and Cecilia's relationship is illicit and does actually bring dishonour when it is 'discovered', although that shame is undeserved. There is an interesting link between the flea, containing the life of Donne and his mistress within it, and Briony, who at one point has control over the lives of Robbie and Cecilia.
However, the flea is killed, described as 'three sins', and then they realise that they are both still alive and unharmed. Similarly Briony, through her actions, causes the death of Robbie and Cecilia but chooses to keep them alive and well in her imagination.
0
reply
username1987655
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by Lit teacher)
Not obvious texts for comparison, so this should be an interesting challenge. There is a theme in both of love, at times forbidden or illicit. Donne refers to there being no loss of honour, although her parents would disagree.
Robbie and Cecilia's relationship is illicit and does actually bring dishonour when it is 'discovered', although that shame is undeserved. There is an interesting link between the flea, containing the life of Donne and his mistress within it, and Briony, who at one point has control over the lives of Robbie and Cecilia.
However, the flea is killed, described as 'three sins', and then they realise that they are both still alive and unharmed. Similarly Briony, through her actions, causes the death of Robbie and Cecilia but chooses to keep them alive and well in her imagination.
Thank you so much for your help!!!!!!
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (170)
14.64%
I'm not sure (54)
4.65%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (342)
29.46%
I have already dropped out (35)
3.01%
I'm not a current university student (560)
48.23%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise