How does momentum work in an explosion?

Watch this thread
RickHendricks
Badges: 19
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Say we are in a situation of a particle exploding, and two particles merge from it, each going at different velocities.

How can momentum be modelled here and is the conservation of momentum applicable in such a situation?
0
reply
Tristan1205
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
Not sure how you could model momentum here, if the particle is just exploding from still then there is no initial momentum to be conserved. But if it is colliding with another particle then momentum should be conserved from the collision. I'm doing As physics at the moment so perhaps somebody more qualified could give an accurate answer, really interesting question though!
0
reply
Gregorius
Badges: 14
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by RickHendricks)
Say we are in a situation of a particle exploding, and two particles merge from it, each going at different velocities.

How can momentum be modelled here and is the conservation of momentum applicable in such a situation?
Yes, conservation of momentum does hold, and you apply it in the usual way, remembering that momentum is a vector. So a single "particle",initially at rest, splitting into two sub-particles of equal mass will leave the scene of the explosion in opposite directions at the same speed as the initial momentum is zero and therefore the sum of the momenta of the two particles after the explosion must sum to zero.
0
reply
tiny hobbit
Badges: 15
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
(Original post by RickHendricks)
Say we are in a situation of a particle exploding, and two particles merge from it, each going at different velocities.

How can momentum be modelled here and is the conservation of momentum applicable in such a situation?
(Original post by Gregorius)
Yes, conservation of momentum does hold, and you apply it in the usual way, remembering that momentum is a vector. So a single "particle",initially at rest, splitting into two sub-particles of equal mass will leave the scene of the explosion in opposite directions at the same speed as the initial momentum is zero and therefore the sum of the momenta of the two particles after the explosion must sum to zero.
If the particles have different masses, they will have to leave at different speeds in order that the total momentum is 0.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

How confident are you that you'll achieve the grades you need to get into your firm uni?

I think I've exceeded the grades for my university offer (22)
17.46%
I think I've met the grades for my university offer (31)
24.6%
I think I've missed the grades for my university offer (68)
53.97%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (5)
3.97%

Watched Threads

View All