DrawTheLine
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I've been revising for my first year exams coming up in May, and I'm now really starting to be scared. I decided to make some plans for essays, using the past questions my lecturers had put online. I've only just stopped crying after 15 minutes - proper weepy crying.

I looked at the titles and all I could do in my head straight away was define the key terms for the introduction. I'm supposed to be able to plan these within 10 minutes in the exam! I'm so stuck for how I'm going to be able to just reel off all of these ideas in the exam and get a good mark.

For this module, my exam is worth 50% of my overall grade for the module. I need to answer 2 questions, one from each section either social, biopsych, developmental, cognitive or individual differences. I need to have 2 strong answers, as my mark will be an average for both of them.

I NEED this exam to go well. For this module we've had an MCT where I got 77, so I'm super happy. But we also had an essay assignment where I got 42 in one, and 62 in the other. The essays are worth 25% and the MCT is also 25%. So because I got the 42 in one essay, I need this exam to go well so I can get a 2:1 in this module. That's what I want. If I get a 2:2, then so be it, I'll have passed.

I've just freaking out, to put it like that. I'm struggling with how I'll be able to write an essay that gets at least 60 in one hour. I've been advised to research and remember 2 studies that I have researched myself (so not from the lecture slides) and that should be enough to answer exam questions on them.

I've read the marking criteria, and to even get a 2:1 you need to be relying on your own research instead of the lecture slides and I'm so worried.

The lecture slides contain studies that are really important in psychology, for example how can I talk about obedience without mentioning Milgram's 1963 study? Or how can I talk about conformity without talking about the Stanford Prison experiment? Those are really important studies but I can't really include them because they're in the lecture.

I need help from a 2nd or 3rd year psychology student who can help me in my method of preparing for these essays. How did you do it in the exam? I'm meeting with my lecturer for social psychology tomorrow to go over some essay plans I've made, because I'm struggling on my own.
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chazwomaq
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(Original post by DrawTheLine)
I've been advised to research and remember 2 studies that I have researched myself (so not from the lecture slides) and that should be enough to answer exam questions on them.

I've read the marking criteria, and to even get a 2:1 you need to be relying on your own research instead of the lecture slides and I'm so worried.

The lecture slides contain studies that are really important in psychology, for example how can I talk about obedience without mentioning Milgram's 1963 study? Or how can I talk about conformity without talking about the Stanford Prison experiment? Those are really important studies but I can't really include them because they're in the lecture.
I think "instead" might be an error here. I advise my students to do their own research as well as the lecture slides. You shouldn't be only replying on lecture slides information for exam essays, but you shouldn't ignore them either.

So if you write about conformity by all means write about the prison "experiment" (but even better if you can critique it too - it's pretty shoddy!). But then also include your own reading from outside the lectures.

But check this when you meet with your lecturer.
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DrawTheLine
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(Original post by chazwomaq)
I think "instead" might be an error here. I advise my students to do their own research as well as the lecture slides. You shouldn't be only replying on lecture slides information for exam essays, but you shouldn't ignore them either.

So if you write about conformity by all means write about the prison "experiment" (but even better if you can critique it too - it's pretty shoddy!). But then also include your own reading from outside the lectures.

But check this when you meet with your lecturer.
Oh okay that's really helpful. So I can write about the studies on the lecture, but then also say "in addition, X did a study showing..." and that would be okay because it shows I've done wider reading, right?
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chazwomaq
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(Original post by DrawTheLine)
Oh okay that's really helpful. So I can write about the studies on the lecture, but then also say "in addition, X did a study showing..." and that would be okay because it shows I've done wider reading, right?
Yes, that's what I advise my students, but double check with your lecturer.
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Noodlestudent
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Good luck, not at uni but hope it goes well!
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