Can anyone who has completed a dissertation answer this.. Watch

Anonymous #1
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For the literature review section where you critique sources, is it ok to just review/critique qualitative studies if they are relevant to your research aim? Or are you supposed to review both quantitative and qualitative?
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username3079870
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(Original post by Anonymous)
For the literature review section where you critique sources, is it ok to just review/critique qualitative studies if they are relevant to your research aim? Or are you supposed to review both quantitative and qualitative?
Critique both. Common academic criticisms of quantitative data include:

1) Sample sizes being inadequate

2) Sample sizes not being representative

3) Results being of low quality. For example, imagine a study that built a malware detector. The quant data shows the study only detected malware 40% of the time. Thats really not much use to anyone, is it?

4) Or even if the quant is on point, you could say you don't have the scope in your dissertation to replicate the results. For example in one of my postgrad papers a study I looked at had over 100,000 malware samples. I had no resources to get that many samples within the timeframe I had, so I had to disqualify recreating the experiment.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by jestersnow)
Critique both. Common academic criticisms of quantitative data include:

1) Sample sizes being inadequate

2) Sample sizes not being representative

3) Results being of low quality. For example, imagine a study that built a malware detector. The quant data shows the study only detected malware 40% of the time. Thats really not much use to anyone, is it?

4) Or even if the quant is on point, you could say you don't have the scope in your dissertation to replicate the results. For example in one of my postgrad papers a study I looked at had over 100,000 malware samples. I had no resources to get that many samples within the timeframe I had, so I had to disqualify recreating the experiment.
Ok thanks. I just find that the qualitative studies are a lot more relevant and Im more competant at critiquing them. Though I do find that I'm mentioning the same stuff for most of the studies i.e. non English/unpublished studies were excluded and member checking wasn't carried out I feel I'm saying the same stuff overtime. I'l try and find a RCT or something similar though so then at least I have quantitative too, thanks!
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username3079870
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Ok thanks. I just find that the qualitative studies are a lot more relevant and Im more competant at critiquing them. Though I do find that I'm mentioning the same stuff for most of the studies i.e. non English/unpublished studies were excluded and member checking wasn't carried out I feel I'm saying the same stuff overtime. I'l try and find a RCT or something similar though so then at least I have quantitative too, thanks!
If you have a google scholar link to a quant study you want to critique, fire it on here and I'll see what I can do. Just to give you more of an idea.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by jestersnow)
If you have a google scholar link to a quant study you want to critique, fire it on here and I'll see what I can do. Just to give you more of an idea.
Thanks for that, theres this one which Im strongly considering using although my topic is slightly different but it would help with justifying my research question. Its quite detailed and long I really doubt you want to read all of it but it doesn't really say what type of study it is that would be a start lol.
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/...79972310369285
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks for that, theres this one which Im strongly considering using although my topic is slightly different but it would help with justifying my research question. Its quite detailed and long I really doubt you want to read all of
it but it doesn't really say what type of study it is that would be a start lol.


http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/...79972310369285

So a major clue is reading the "limitations of the study" section. Additionally, and bearing in mind I don't know anything about the subject:

1) The authors state that their study showed that a higher rate of risk of females suffering from depression and anxiety, but as is my understanding females normally are at higher risk from suffering from depression and anxiety. Is the risk any higher compared
to people not undertaking pulmonary rehabilitation or just the same?

2) The demographics for the study were not equal (e.g. there were a lot more men than women). Is this a big factor?

3) Possibly not a quant question, but what criticisms are there of HADS that might not make it suitable for your dissertation?
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