jaaek
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I'm wanting to study an undergraduate psychology degree but don't know what is better, a open university degree or actually going to a brick uni like Exeter?

I want to eventually train as a counsellor, but there are quite a lot of issues with going to a brick university but if it's going to completely screw over my chance of a job in the future then I will have to properly think about it ...

I'd prefer to do an open uni degree because then I can live where I am at the moment, not have to move away from my fiance and not have the overly social aspect of having to goto university. I have mental health issues and stressful situations make it worse, so I'm not entirley sure what to do

I will be 21 when starting uni so I'll be a mature student (ish)

thank you !!!
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Esther9500
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(Original post by jaaek)
I'm wanting to study an undergraduate psychology degree but don't know what is better, a open university degree or actually going to a brick uni like Exeter?

I want to eventually train as a counsellor, but there are quite a lot of issues with going to a brick university but if it's going to completely screw over my chance of a job in the future then I will have to properly think about it ...

I'd prefer to do an open uni degree because then I can live where I am at the moment, not have to move away from my fiance and not have the overly social aspect of having to goto university. I have mental health issues and stressful situations make it worse, so I'm not entirley sure what to do

I will be 21 when starting uni so I'll be a mature student (ish)

thank you !!!
Exeter is a Russell Group uni you do realise?
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jaaek
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(Original post by Esther9500)
Exeter is a Russell Group uni you do realise?
yeah I know. i know its a great university. the open uni course is also accredited by the BPS though ..
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Esther9500
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(Original post by jaaek)
yeah I know. i know its a great university. the open uni course is also accredited by the BPS though ..
Hiya. I just wanted to clarify because your title says brick uni vs open university. I just wanted you to know Exeter is a Russel group uni since you say in your original post ‘there are a lot of issues of going to brick uni’.

It’s a really personal choice. I’d recommend going to Exeter since it will give that opportunity of going to uni, moving out, making new friends etc. I went to an Exeter open day and liked it. It’s up to you tho.
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Snufkin
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(Original post by jaaek)
I'm wanting to study an undergraduate psychology degree but don't know what is better, a open university degree or actually going to a brick uni like Exeter?

I want to eventually train as a counsellor, but there are quite a lot of issues with going to a brick university but if it's going to completely screw over my chance of a job in the future then I will have to properly think about it ...

I'd prefer to do an open uni degree because then I can live where I am at the moment, not have to move away from my fiance and not have the overly social aspect of having to goto university. I have mental health issues and stressful situations make it worse, so I'm not entirley sure what to do

I will be 21 when starting uni so I'll be a mature student (ish)

thank you !!!
Those are all good reasons for doing an Open University degree, the risk to your health is not worth having 'Exeter' on your CV. I am not familiar with the counselling profession but I think it is extraordinarily unlikely that having an OU degree will limit your employment prospects (in fact, employers generally have a very high value for Open University graduates). If you are still unsure, perhaps you could speak to potential employers and ask them what their opinions of the OU are - and it'd also be a good idea to phone the OU and ask to speak to a careers adviser.
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DrSocSciences
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IMO Open Uni qualifications take a very, very long time to complete. Perhaps that's less critical given your current age, but bear in mind that your earning capacity in relation to your new study will be deferred for at least another five or six years.
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Snufkin
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(Original post by DrSocSciences)
IMO Open Uni qualifications take a very, very long time to complete. Perhaps that's less critical given your current age, but bear in mind that your earning capacity in relation to your new study will be deferred for at least another five or six years.
Not necessarily, it is certainly possible to complete an OU degree in three years.
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Realitysreflexx
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Your better off at Exeter... You will have more of an experience and more support, also a RG uni offers richer facilities and experience, university is also about bonding with coursemates and making life long friends.

Open uni

You will get less support.
Workload will be easier.
No real uni feel.
Less fees but also no experience.
You pay the same amount wether you owe alot or a little its irrelevant.

Psychology usually requires a masters... you have this option with both degrees. (though may have more personal connection with lecturers at exeter to give you a better reference)(possibly)
Open university is going through some odd issues with infighting and potential cuts.
Will likely be classed negatively in the upcoming university reviews by government due to high drop out rates.

Russell group top up from Exeter... that may allow you to work outside of psychology with the degree.
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Snufkin
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
Your better off at Exeter... You will have more of an experience and more support, also a RG uni offers richer facilities and experience, university is also about bonding with coursemates and making life long friends.

Open uni

You will get less support.
Workload will be easier.
No real uni feel.
Less fees but also no experience.
You pay the same amount wether you owe alot or a little its irrelevant.

Psychology usually requires a masters... you have this option with both degrees. (though may have more personal connection with lecturers at exeter to give you a better reference)(possibly)
Open university is going through some odd issues with infighting and potential cuts.
Will likely be classed negatively in the upcoming university reviews by government due to high drop out rates.

Russell group top up from Exeter... that may allow you to work outside of psychology with the degree.
You can 'work outside of psychology' with an OU degree too. As I said above, employers have a very high value for Open University graduates. I don't agree with what you said re the workload at the OU being easier and there being less support (you have not studied with the OU so how would you know what the workload is like? :dong:), or that the OU is in danger from cuts or any upcoming government reviews.

There are good reasons to go to a 'brick' (physical) university, such as student experience and better study facilities - however, these need to be balanced with the OP's health. If, as it sounds, the environment at Exeter would make their mental health worse then there's no sense is going there.
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DrSocSciences
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(Original post by Snufkin)
Not necessarily, it is certainly possible to complete an OU degree in three years.
True, but even the OU states that with full time study, a degree requiring 360 credits takes 3-4 years, or part time, it's 6 years. For me, it's very telling that within OU you can earn a 'Certificate' with a year's study, but a Masters degree at a regular university.
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Realitysreflexx
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(Original post by Snufkin)
You can 'work outside of psychology' with an OU degree too. As I said above, employers have a very high value for Open University graduates. I don't agree with what you said re the workload at the OU being easier and there being less support (you have not studied with the OU so how would you know what the workload is like? :dong:), or that the OU is in danger from cuts or any upcoming government reviews.

There are good reasons to go to a 'brick' (physical) university, such as student experience and better study facilities - however, these need to be balanced with the OP's health. If, as it sounds, the environment at Exeter would make their mental health worse then there's no sense is going there.
How wouldnt the workload be less at an instuition with far lower entry requirements................ 😂 there has been bad press lately also, Vice chancellor claiming university is a farce.

But yes your very much correct i didnt fully read OPs disclaimer of mental health.

I would then change my recommendation to Open.
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Snufkin
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
How wouldnt the workload be less at an instuition with far lower entry requirements................ 😂 there has been bad press lately also, Vice chancellor claiming university is a farce.
Entry requirements are not an indicator of workload. And no, the OU vice chancellor did not say that.
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Realitysreflexx
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(Original post by Snufkin)
Entry requirements are not an indicator of workload. And no, the OU vice chancellor did not say that.
https://www.timeshighereducation.com...ics-dont-teach

....entry requirements must determine either workload or difficulty of course... or whats the point of them?
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Snufkin
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(Original post by Realitysreflexx)
https://www.timeshighereducation.com...ics-dont-teach

....entry requirements must determine either workload or difficulty of course... or whats the point of them?
He made an erroneous comment about OU academics not teaching, which he has since apologised for. He did not say or suggest the OU was a "farce".

Well, they don't determine the workload or the difficulty of a course, and that's that. Universities don't have an infinite number of places, entry requirements are a way of reducing the pool of applicants and making the job easier for admissions tutors.
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