geniequeen48
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Hi I'm stuck between these two for medicine.

I prefer the course at UEA even though I'm still unsure how I feel about PBL and if I will learn/catch up as it seems more fast paced? But the course is more exciting it seems. I feel that UEA offers a more hands on curriculum whereas southampton is more passive and perhaps boring due to lack of variation and that it's lecture based-correct me if I'm wrong?

The vibe at Southmpton is much better at UEA, and the campus at southampton is so much prettier than UEA. UEA has a really dull and boring campus. I don't know how I feel about the cities as Southampton is situated in the city but UEA is situated just outside in a forest.

Which one should I choose and why?
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Student7866
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Uea much better
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random_matt
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Southampton, what makes you happier is far more important,
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DibbyDabby
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Hiya, first year from Southampton here!

What is more important to you? Work out what that is and then use that to help you decide.
Personally I made a big pro/con list for the universities I was deciding between last year when i was in your situation!

Southampton is lecture based but we also have several tutorials and anatomy practicals each week as well as workshops so its not all sitting in a lecture theatre. I guess for the teaching style it depends which works best for you although that can be hard to work out when you haven't really experience either!

I was also worried about moving to a city but the campus at Southampton isnt right in the city centre so it isnt as busy as other city universities, but at the same time the city centre is only a short cycle or bus ride away so you get all the benefits of city life.

I hope that helps a bit and Im happy to answer any more questions
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username334839
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Run as far away as you can from PBL
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geniequeen48
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(Original post by Cravez)
Run as far away as you can from PBL
Yeah, why?
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geniequeen48
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Do you feel well prepared as a doctor? As in clinical skills?
(Original post by DibbyDabby)
Hiya, first year from Southampton here!

What is more important to you? Work out what that is and then use that to help you decide.
Personally I made a big pro/con list for the universities I was deciding between last year when i was in your situation!

Southampton is lecture based but we also have several tutorials and anatomy practicals each week as well as workshops so its not all sitting in a lecture theatre. I guess for the teaching style it depends which works best for you although that can be hard to work out when you haven't really experience either!

I was also worried about moving to a city but the campus at Southampton isnt right in the city centre so it isnt as busy as other city universities, but at the same time the city centre is only a short cycle or bus ride away so you get all the benefits of city life.

I hope that helps a bit and Im happy to answer any more questions
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username334839
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(Original post by Volibear)
Why?

Sent from my SM-J320FN using Tapatalk

Its a very crude and shortcut way of teaching medicine.

Effectively you end up doing much more independent learning than a traditional course. Which is difficult to do when you have just started medicine at 18 years of age. Medicine is a vast never-ending subject and a PBL course, whilst having so called "learning objectives", doesn’t help you identify the most important aspects that you need to know. They simply expect you to go away and find out everything yourself.

Don’t get me wrong, independent learning is very important, and the vast majority of learning that one will do as an adult is independent. However, when you have just started out at medical school sometimes you simply need someone to tell you what on earth to focus on, what’s important and less important, which resources are best to use, what anatomy and physiology is most pertinent to get to grips with etc. The advantage of a traditional course is that you will get much more lectures and contact time that will essentially spoon feed you these key bits of information, and at £9000 a year there is absolutely nothing wrong with that as far as I can see.

Another thing I find really annoying about PBL is that you end up sitting with other students for about 4 hours a week trying to regurgitate your knowledge about X,Y or Z. Which is fine, but the problem is that you are not allowed to use any resources during these sessions. So if somebody says something that is ambiguous then you can’t check it there on the spot. This really messes with my head because people end up saying all sorts of rubbish that you later find out is incorrect. By 3rd year the PBL sessions just end up becoming a joke which nobody takes seriously anyway because it isn’t a good use of time and certainly isn’t an effective way to learn medicine.

When you go to medical school open days they will tell you that there is an “expert tutor” present at each PBL session who will correct any mistakes and stop you going off track. This is the biggest lie I have ever heard regarding PBL education. None of the tutors I have had have been experts in medicine. Actually, many of them end up being non-medical staff that don’t know very much at all about medicine and are simply there as a tick box exercise. They sit there and basically do nothing.

I suppose for balance I should write something positive about PBL. I guess that it trains you to go out and look for resources yourself instead of just focusing on lecture slides??? But on the other hand, I know plenty of medical students from non-PBL courses that already use a wide pool of resources. The thing about a traditional or integrated course is that you are at liberty to attend the lectures or leave them. They are not mandatory, but they are at least there as a reliable resource for you to use.

I wont mention which medical school I go to. They would throw a hissy fit if they saw this lol.
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username334839
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(Original post by Volibear)
As somebody who has already completed a degree and it was 'traditional', what you've just written sounds right up my alley. Nonetheless, I can see where some people would struggle with it, especially if they are school leavers and have essentially been spoon fed for all their academic lives. Heck, the idea of a PBL course would have terrified 18 year old me. But now that I've been through university, I can already tell that PBL would probably suit me a lot better.

Can you PM me which medical school you go to?
See what you are saying but I also have a a degree... 2 in fact haha. I would just add that a medical degree is completely different to any degree you have done before.
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username334839
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(Original post by Volibear)
I am aware. But I'm just going by experience. I don't learn as well from the 'traditional' way and somehow I doubt that will change with medicine. Oh well it's a risk I'm willing to take and only time will tell.

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If you learn better via PBL then defintely go for it.

Ive been getting some PMs about my post and probably should add that doing a PBL course wont make you any worse or better a doctor than somebody who did a traditional or integrated course.
Medical competencies are mostly developed through clinical exposure and just damn hard work. If you want to be a good doctor then you will be a good doctor regardless of whether your course was PBL or not.
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Rainy Times
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At UEA the PBL component is only one morning/week, most of the course is still lectures/anatomy/primary care/secondary care. 1st year timetable is typically lectures most of the day Monday/Tuesday, anatomy Weds AM, primary care all day Thursday, PBL Friday AM and one or two lectures Friday PM.

One thing I will say is that PBL encourages you to go and do the reading yourself. Lectures are useful for signposting you to which topics you need to learn, but you do need to understand this stuff more thoroughly than it is possible for a lecturer to cover.

Oh and also lectures are compulsory at UEA. They don't register that often but just enough to be annoying, and you get negative professionalism marks for the year if you miss too many. Something to bear in mind if you don't like compulsory teaching!
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DibbyDabby
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(Original post by geniequeen48)
Do you feel well prepared as a doctor? As in clinical skills?
Well im only in my first year so we are more focused on learning the science but i have done lots of history taking as part of my GP placemetns every other week.
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geniequeen48
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(Original post by DibbyDabby)
Well im only in my first year so we are more focused on learning the science but i have done lots of history taking as part of my GP placemetns every other week.
So do you think it makes that much of a difference as opposed to doing it weekly from week 1?
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