‘Dropping everything’ to be there for a friend

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
So my friend called me up in tears asking me to come round and stay overnight tonight and she’s had a panic attack.

When I told my mum I was going, she was quite surprised and said ‘so you’re just going to drop everything and go to hers?’ And found it really strange, acting as though the friend is using me.

In all honesty I was hoping to have a relaxing evening in but I feel like in a situation like that, you can’t really say no to a friend, especially as she is completely home alone as her parents are away. Thoughts?
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Lovethepugs
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#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
well it really depends on what happend to her like why she had this panic attack if she starts to get better then don't go to her maybe facetime for a while
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Little Popcorns
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#3
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#3
(Original post by Anonymous)
So my friend called me up in tears asking me to come round and stay overnight tonight and she’s had a panic attack.

When I told my mum I was going, she was quite surprised and said ‘so you’re just going to drop everything and go to hers?’ And found it really strange, acting as though the friend is using me.

In all honesty I was hoping to have a relaxing evening in but I feel like in a situation like that, you can’t really say no to a friend, especially as she is completely home alone as her parents are away. Thoughts?
If your mum has a problem with you going there and your friend is clearly quite upset and distressed you should go and collect your friend and bring her over to yours? If your friend obviously wouldn’t mind as she’s the one that’s having a bad time not your mum. But don’t argue with your mum just suggest it if she has a problem then just say wouldn’t she be there for her friend if she needed her?
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doodle_333
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#4
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#4
As long as your friendship is fairly equal and you'e happy then there's no problem.
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bones-mccoy
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#5
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#5
As long as you weren't in the middle of something important, I don't see any problem with you going to help a friend in need. I wonder what your mum would say if the roles were reversed - I'm fairly sure she'd want someone to be there for you if you were in distress.
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Tiger Rag
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#6
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#6
Seemed like a bit of an odd reaction. Did you mum expect you to just ignore your friend?
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Anonymous #2
#7
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#7
it sounds like your mum just has a problem with this particular friend
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the bear
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#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
why not ask your friend over to your house instead ?
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