AQA A LEVEL PSYCHOLOGY - What do I do now !!? Watch

Jake_logan
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#1
Hi guys,


I've been predicted an A in A level Psychology. I have all my notes made. What do I do now to secure this A in my papers. And here's a question, do I need to get an A in paperS 1,2 and 3 to get an A overall?

This subject is stressing me out as to how much content there is to learn.
0
reply
Jake_logan
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#2
Fully want to cry about it.
0
reply
TRAnders
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report 11 months ago
#3
They have got rid of UMS so now its the combined mark across the 3 papers - thats how they will calculate the grade. Honestly revising psychology is horrible. I love the subject, find it so interesting but just having to rehearse the content again and again is dull.

Seeing as you have made all your notes I would suggest making flashcards, essay plans and simply going through the content again and again. Writing out what you know, then adding whatever you missed out using the book is also a good strategy. I would also suggest doing a lot of past paper questions for research methods. Personally I am not going to do many past paper questions for topics other than RM simply because it is so content based, technique is limited.
1
reply
lukeashworth21
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#4
Report 11 months ago
#4
Make new notes - condense information as much as possible so that you can realistically remember the content during the exam.
1
reply
Jake_logan
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#5
(Original post by TRAnders)
They have got rid of UMS so now its the combined mark across the 3 papers - thats how they will calculate the grade. Honestly revising psychology is horrible. I love the subject, find it so interesting but just having to rehearse the content again and again is dull.

Seeing as you have made all your notes I would suggest making flashcards, essay plans and simply going through the content again and again. Writing out what you know, then adding whatever you missed out using the book is also a good strategy. I would also suggest doing a lot of past paper questions for research methods. Personally I am not going to do many past paper questions for topics other than RM simply because it is so content based, technique is limited.
Thank you, I will definitely prioritise RM!
And I know, it's tedious revising PSY and I for one am in love with the subject, it's just so fascinating.

So I'm really aiming for 70-85% in each paper to guarantee an A really?


(Original post by lukeashworth21)
Make new notes - condense information as much as possible so that you can realistically remember the content during the exam.
Already have that, but thank you for the advice.
0
reply
louisee88
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#6
Report 11 months ago
#6
I’m predicted a B in psychology and feel the same pressure as you do! I like to record myself talk about a particular topic and listen to it when I walk to work or go to the gym or whatever! Flash cards are also a life saviour! Especially for evaluation points on a certain thing eg write on one side of the card biological approach to treating OCD then three short evaluation points on the other side! I find mind maps really useful too for psychology revision because everything fits in together and you can elaborate on points across all of the paper. Hope this helps☺️ don’t push yourself too hard and the best of luck!
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Jake_logan
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#7
(Original post by louisee88)
I’m predicted a B in psychology and feel the same pressure as you do! I like to record myself talk about a particular topic and listen to it when I walk to work or go to the gym or whatever! Flash cards are also a life saviour! Especially for evaluation points on a certain thing eg write on one side of the card biological approach to treating OCD then three short evaluation points on the other side! I find mind maps really useful too for psychology revision because everything fits in together and you can elaborate on points across all of the paper. Hope this helps☺️ don’t push yourself too hard and the best of luck!
Thanks for your reply! People always say use mindmaps, but I don't know how to effectively use them; how do you?
0
reply
Lia22
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report 11 months ago
#8
omg same! I can learn content but it's the names that get me. For each spread there's Atleast 5 names I need to remember, and it's confusing all my studies up *cry*
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
louisee88
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#9
Report 11 months ago
#9
So for example I have just finished a psychopathology mind map and on the piece of paper has everything about psychopathology! It’s pretty packed but it’s also great because you don’t want to revise every word for word and just write write write. I find it useful to write a topic to a page because I’ll look at a point and elaborate more information in my head (which is what we do in the exam anyway) and anything I see on the paper that I can’t say lots about I’ll go away and revise it until I can!
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
1
reply
eoj89
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report 11 months ago
#10
OP, I'm predicted an A in Psych too, and I find that alongside using the other techniques mentioned above, a great way of revising is going over material as if you're teaching it to someone else - or, even better, get together with someone and tell them what you know/discuss what you know as if the person you're 'teaching' has no idea what you're talking about and they're hearing the information for the first time, etc. If that makes any sense. There's a specific name for the technique but I can't think of what it's called.With me, my cousin has a degree in Psych so sometimes I use her to revise with and we'll sit down and discuss the content and how it can be applied and what to contrast it to, etc. but most of the time I sit down with a few people who do A2 Psych and help them, so they're learning through the consolidation of my learning.

I don't know what topics you're doing for A2 (I do Schizophrenia, Gender and Forensics alongside everything else), but for these topics I like to divide each area and sub-area into biological, psychological/cognitive and interactionist and it gives me a clearer view of everything I need to go over. Using schizophrenia as an example, I'd take the dopamine hypothesis, neural correlates, genetics, twin studies, family studies etc and label that biological, take the Stroop test, metarepresentation, Alien-hand syndrome etc and label that psychological, and anything that's a combination of the two I'd label interactionist, along with Meehl's 'schizogene' etc. I'd probs take that a bit further and try and make as many synoptic links as possible and link different parts of the schiz spec together and relate Meehl's schizogene to the idea that there's a candidate gene responsible for the development of schizophrenia.

For the AS topics, our teacher organises for us sometimes to basically teach the AS students Memory, Psychopathology, Attachment etc similar to the way in which I revise by teaching other people and that also helps, but I find it's quite easy to revise Psychopathology and Attachment particularly now that we've covered Issues
1
reply
TRAnders
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report 11 months ago
#11
(Original post by Lia22)
omg same! I can learn content but it's the names that get me. For each spread there's Atleast 5 names I need to remember, and it's confusing all my studies up *cry*
Just so you know you do not need to memorise 90% of the names in A Level psyc - only those specifically mentioned in the spec (Schaffer, Bandura etc). Its fine to say a study carried out to test x (hypothesis).... found y this suggests... (if eval either support or reject the question/approach)
0
reply
Lia22
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#12
Report 11 months ago
#12
(Original post by TRAnders)
Just so you know you do not need to memorise 90% of the names in A Level psyc - only those specifically mentioned in the spec (Schaffer, Bandura etc). Its fine to say a study carried out to test x (hypothesis).... found y this suggests... (if eval either support or reject the question/approach)
whaaaat?! really??
I was told I had to learn them
This makes life so much easier
Thanks
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
TRAnders
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#13
Report 11 months ago
#13
(Original post by Lia22)
whaaaat?! really??
I was told I had to learn them
This makes life so much easier
Thanks
No worries! I started the year learning every single name, it just makes life impossible.
0
reply
TRAnders
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#14
Report 11 months ago
#14
Also as general advice, for most of the topics (especially aggression and relationships) you can have one or two evaluation points that you can use in any essay. Things like determinism, temporal validity, correlation does not = causation, lack of generalisability.

For example in nearly all of the aggression essays you can include that the measures of aggression that they use are either...

1) Lacking generalisability to the real world (ie delivering loud noises to P's is not a good measure of real world aggression)
OR
2) They are not actually measuring aggression but frustration (correlational issue) maybe link that the frustration - aggression hypothesis. For example video games cause frustration which leads to aggression - video games do not make people more violent, anything that causes frustration will have the same effect for example.
0
reply
lukeashworth21
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#15
Report 11 months ago
#15
(Original post by Lia22)
whaaaat?! really??
I was told I had to learn them
This makes life so much easier
Thanks
While it's good to remember as many names as you can, I found that it was better to just try and remember the main points of a study (and/or evaluation of study). This shows that you actually understand what it means rather than blindly remembering names, which is what will get you marks.
0
reply
Blancosdos
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#16
Report 11 months ago
#16
(Original post by TRAnders)
Just so you know you do not need to memorise 90% of the names in A Level psyc - only those specifically mentioned in the spec (Schaffer, Bandura etc). Its fine to say a study carried out to test x (hypothesis).... found y this suggests... (if eval either support or reject the question/approach)
Also one doesn't need to learn the 5 evaluation points(no time to do so). 3-4 developed is fine. I went to a Tutor2U seminar and they said that 2 eval points is fine IF it is developed.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cardiff University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • University of Portsmouth
    Postgraduate and Part-Time Open Evenings Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19
  • Middlesex University London
    Postgraduate Open Evening Postgraduate
    Wed, 27 Mar '19

How old were you when you first saw porn?

I've never seen it (116)
22.01%
Before I was 12 (176)
33.4%
13 (84)
15.94%
14 (61)
11.57%
15 (37)
7.02%
16 (14)
2.66%
17 (6)
1.14%
18 (5)
0.95%
Between the ages of 19 - 24 (6)
1.14%
Over 25 (1)
0.19%
12 (21)
3.98%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise