Master in Economics: LSE vs Cambridge vs Oxford Watch

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I am currently holding offers for the MSc Econ at LSE and the MPhil Econ at Oxford and Cambridge. Do you have insights into the reputation of said programmes, especially concerning industry (finance/consulting/etc) job prospects?

Obviously Oxford, as a two year deal, is the most expensive. Somehow I feel like LSE is not on par with Oxbridge.

Thanks a lot!
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swaxlee
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(Original post by 134576)
I am currently holding offers for the MSc Econ at LSE and the MPhil Econ at Oxford and Cambridge. Do you have insights into the reputation of said programmes, especially concerning industry (finance/consulting/etc) job prospects?

Obviously Oxford, as a two year deal, is the most expensive. Somehow I feel like LSE is not on par with Oxbridge.

Thanks a lot!
Oxbridge may give you a slight advantage, expecially for consulting, over LSE. I will stress though that the difference is small.

All of those programmes are very good in terms of industry prospects. Biggest issue is the rest of your application such as work experience/internships, technical knowledge etc etc. That's what it'll ultimately come down to.

I'd recommend you look around on linkedin to find people who've gone through what you have for a more personal insight than one I or anyone here can give.
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(Original post by swaxlee)
Oxbridge may give you a slight advantage, expecially for consulting, over LSE. I will stress though that the difference is small.

All of those programmes are very good in terms of industry prospects. Biggest issue is the rest of your application such as work experience/internships, technical knowledge etc etc. That's what it'll ultimately come down to.

I'd recommend you look around on linkedin to find people who've gone through what you have for a more personal insight than one I or anyone here can give.
Thanks. Your advise is much appreciated. I guess what my dilemma really boils down to is the following: Is the extra education and the more "academic" approach of the Oxford MPhil valued in the non academic world?

The real issue I am currently facing is spending an additional year and GBP 20 000+ on the Oxford MPhil. This programme appeals to me, but I am unsure if it is worth it. Maybe I just prefer Oxford as it is a lot more competitive...
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by 134576)
Thanks. Your advise is much appreciated. I guess what my dilemma really boils down to is the following: Is the extra education and the more "academic" approach of the Oxford MPhil valued in the non academic world?

The real issue I am currently facing is spending an additional year and GBP 20 000+ on the Oxford MPhil. This programme appeals to me, but I am unsure if it is worth it. Maybe I just prefer Oxford as it is a lot more competitive...
Go to Cambridge then? My impression was the Cambridge department was considered more technically rigorous than Oxford's (although both less so than LSE from what I can tell...).
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username3675786
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Gonna be honest, while Oxbridge is better for many things, on this I personally think LSE is better. LSE economics for postgrad specifically is arguably the best economics department in the world. LSE grads earn more than from any other uni in the UK.
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swaxlee
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(Original post by 134576)
Thanks. Your advise is much appreciated. I guess what my dilemma really boils down to is the following: Is the extra education and the more "academic" approach of the Oxford MPhil valued in the non academic world?

The real issue I am currently facing is spending an additional year and GBP 20 000+ on the Oxford MPhil. This programme appeals to me, but I am unsure if it is worth it. Maybe I just prefer Oxford as it is a lot more competitive...
The name that Oxford carries will certainly be valued but the fact that you did that specific course wont really be recognised in the non-academic world. You'd have to just market whatever you do in the course as a transferable skill to employers I guess.

I see the dilemma that you're in. One benefit that you get with doing 2 years is that you'd only apply for internships after a year, by which time you can really prepare yourself. Though that's probably not a wise thing to go by.

As I said, best thing to do is try to get in contact with others who've done a master's with intentions of going into industry.
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Go to Cambridge then? My impression was the Cambridge department was considered more technically rigorous than Oxford's (although both less so than LSE from what I can tell...).
That's interesting. I was led to believe that LSE is the least rigorous (by far) and that Oxford is a lot more rigorous than Cambridge.
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(Original post by GapYaar)
Gonna be honest, while Oxbridge is better for many things, on this I personally think LSE is better. LSE economics for postgrad is arguably the best economics department in the world. LSE economics grads earn more than any other degree from any other uni in the UK (Look it up).
I would kindly ask for the source! Thanks.
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swaxlee
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(Original post by GapYaar)
Gonna be honest, while Oxbridge is better for many things, on this I personally think LSE is better. LSE economics for postgrad is arguably the best economics department in the world. LSE economics grads earn more than any other degree from any other uni in the UK (Look it up).
That's not as a result of LSE itself, rather its that LSE economists tend to pursue high paying careers
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(Original post by swaxlee)
That's not as a result of LSE itself, rather its that LSE economists tend to pursue high paying careers
Yes. Thanks, that was my thought as well.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by 134576)
That's interesting. I was led to believe that LSE is the least rigorous (by far) and that Oxford is a lot more rigorous than Cambridge.
Led to believe by whom?

At the undergraduate level certainly Cambridge, LSE and Warwick are all considered considerably more technical and mathematically rigorous than Oxford. At the graduate level this may vary somewhat, but taught masters' courses tend to be more similar to undergraduate course offerings than graduate research offerings...

In any case, the differences between them are going to be marginal, if existent. But certainly my impression is as far as mathematical and technical sophistication goes, LSE would be the place to be, followed by Cambridge and (then?) Oxford - possible interchangeably between the last two.

Perhaps look at the research offerings of the universities to see which actually actively research things you would be interested in writing a dissertation/thesis on, as I believe any of the noted courses will require this...
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Led to believe by whom?

At the undergraduate level certainly Cambridge, LSE and Warwick are all considered considerably more technical and mathematically rigorous than Oxford. At the graduate level this may vary somewhat, but taught masters' courses tend to be more similar to undergraduate course offerings than graduate research offerings...

In any case, the differences between them are going to be marginal, if existent. But certainly my impression is as far as mathematical and technical sophistication goes, LSE would be the place to be, followed by Cambridge and (then?) Oxford - possible interchangeably between the last two.

Perhaps look at the research offerings of the universities to see which actually actively research things you would be interested in writing a dissertation/thesis on, as I believe any of the noted courses will require this...
By graduates and professors. Obviously, the undergrad perception is skewed as Oxford just offers the PPE programme. As Oxford spends a whole year on the grad micro/macro and econometrics basics it should me more thorough than LSE, right?
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(Original post by 134576)
I am currently holding offers for the MSc Econ at LSE and the MPhil Econ at Oxford and Cambridge. Do you have insights into the reputation of said programmes, especially concerning industry (finance/consulting/etc) job prospects?

Obviously Oxford, as a two year deal, is the most expensive. Somehow I feel like LSE is not on par with Oxbridge.

Thanks a lot!
Why does it matter, you're probably rich as hell anyway

And their prospects will be identical
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username3675786
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Led to believe by whom?

At the undergraduate level certainly Cambridge, LSE and Warwick are all considered considerably more technical and mathematically rigorous than Oxford. At the graduate level this may vary somewhat, but taught masters' courses tend to be more similar to undergraduate course offerings than graduate research offerings...

In any case, the differences between them are going to be marginal, if existent. But certainly my impression is as far as mathematical and technical sophistication goes, LSE would be the place to be, followed by Cambridge and (then?) Oxford - possible interchangeably between the last two.

Perhaps look at the research offerings of the universities to see which actually actively research things you would be interested in writing a dissertation/thesis on, as I believe any of the noted courses will require this...
Agreed, LSE has more economics nobel prizes than any other UK uni, for economics they can go toe-to-toe/surpass anyone. But ultimately all 3 are excellent, I'd personally pick on location/cost.
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(Original post by 134576)
I wish I'de be. It's all loans.
How'd you get loans to cover 20k+ fees?
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(Original post by GapYaar)
Agreed, LSE has more economics nobel prizes than any other UK uni, for economics they can go toe-to-toe/surpass anyone. But ultimately all 3 are excellent, I'd personally pick on location/cost.
But LSE is by far the easiest to get into. I feel LSE is a degree mill. I personally know nobody who got rejected by LSE for a grad course.
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The Assassin
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LSE or Oxford. Cambridge might have been the best place to study Economics 50 years ago, but it has since become insular and stagnated. It is still a fine institution to study but when you have other options like the LSE or Oxford then go for those.

The difference here is that Oxford's more than just an masters degree - as they rightly describe its equivalent to the first two years of the PhD's at the best US colleges but much of that might be overkill as to what you want to do.
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(Original post by 134576)
But LSE is by far the easiest to get into. I feel LSE is a degree mill. I personally know nobody who got rejected by LSE for a grad course.
Look, you seem pretty hung up on not going to LSE, if you already feel that way I'm not sure why you posted this. I've gave you my argument, specifically for economics at masters level, I would personally choose LSE. But you can't go wrong with any of them, I'm sure you'll make the best choice for you.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by 134576)
By graduates and professors. Obviously, the undergrad perception is skewed as Oxford just offers the PPE programme. As Oxford spends a whole year on the grad micro/macro and econometrics basics it should me more thorough than LSE, right?
They also have Economics & Management and History & Economics. The point certainly applies as they're all somewhat more "arts"-y for undergraduate.

However I see no evidence the Oxford department is more "thorough" overall - LSE certainly has even more "thorough" options such as the EME course, which is at least on par with that and certainly appears to have more mathematically sophisticated options for example. I imagine both are slightly more oriented towards preparing students for academic research than working in industry however...

At the end of the day if your only intention is to go into industry any of them will suffice - the only relevant industry roles which rely on specific programme content rather than just the "brand name" normally require a PhD in any case. If you can afford the two year course, by all means go for it - if you can't, then don't dig yourself into debt unnecessarily due to assuming the differences between the courses are of the same magnitude as between Southampton Solent and the University of Southampton, as an illustrative example.
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(Original post by 134576)
I am currently holding offers for the MSc Econ at LSE and the MPhil Econ at Oxford and Cambridge. Do you have insights into the reputation of said programmes, especially concerning industry (finance/consulting/etc) job prospects?

Obviously Oxford, as a two year deal, is the most expensive. Somehow I feel like LSE is not on par with Oxbridge.

Thanks a lot!
Oxford if you plan to do a DPhil. Cambridge if you plan to go into industry. LSE if you're loaded and wants to live in London.
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