Can a 16 marker A-Level Psychology essay only involve Weaknesses/Disadvantages???? Watch

VVDOOMVV
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in the evaluation portion of a 16 marker - is it possible to only involve weaknesses and no strengths and vice versa?

I'm asking this because I am attempting to evaluate Schaffer and Emerson's stages of attachments. However my textbook and my teachers only gave me Weaknesses/disadvantages?

Would this mark me down in an exam?
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louisee88
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Nope doesn’t matter if you only use advantages or disadvantages to evaluate something! My psychology teacher tells us that we write three paragraphs on the content of the question (different types of long term memory for example) and three evaluation points whether they’re good or bad. The important thing is how you structure the evaluation points, that’s what the examiner is also looking for as well as your own knowledge of course. For example, One weakness is.....For instance.....This would suggest....subsequently.... hope this helps 😊
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Yme2day
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(Original post by VVDOOMVV)
in the evaluation portion of a 16 marker - is it possible to only involve weaknesses and no strengths and vice versa?

I'm asking this because I am attempting to evaluate Schaffer and Emerson's stages of attachments. However my textbook and my teachers only gave me Weaknesses/disadvantages?

Would this mark me down in an exam?
As someone else has ponted out, you dont have to provide a balnaced evaluation of anything in the essays, but it does help me recall the points in exams. I have 2 positive evaluative points about Schaffer and Emmerson's study on Glaswegian infants in relation to stages of attachment development. And also I will try to employ the structure tho other user suggested.

1. One advantage/positive of Schaffer and Emmerson's study would be that it has high mundane realism, for example the study was conducted in every day situations (i.e. researchers would conduct their data by going to the infant's home). This would suggest that the conclusions drawn from the study (i.e. There is a common pattern of attachment formation in all infants and therefore a possible biological mechanism to it) can be generaliseable to a wider context and has high external validity, since the study was conducted in an organic setting. Subsequently this would also mean that the study also has high ecological validty since as aforementioned the research was done in an every day conditions.

I suppose the more i think about the following evaluative point the weaker it seems...I'll write it out regardless and you can use it if you wish.

2.The study provides supporting evidence for the stages of attachment. S
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zainwaraich123
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can someone plz send me an example essay 16 marker or 12 marker on this forum site.

asap ply , any ques, just need a great essay

if it aint great, still submit it asap

thanks
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Angelic Charm
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Sorry if the format is a bit weir/there's grammar errors. I have broken it down for my revision note purposes Hope this helps!

With reference to reciprocity and interactional synchrony, discuss infant caregiver interactions (16m)

AO1:

  • Interactions between caregivers and infants provide an insight into the type and nature of attachment.


Reciprocity is when an infant responds to the actions of another by turn taking.

  • The actions of the primary caregiver elicit a response from the infant. The interaction between both individuals flows back and forth.


Meltzoff & Moore conducted an observational study whereby an adult displayed facial observational study whereby an adult displayed facial expressions or a hand gesture.

  • Following the display from the model, a dummy was removed from the child’s mouth and their expressions filmed. There was an association between the infants’ behaviour and that of the adult model, showing reciprocity.


Interactional synchrony takes place when infants mirror the actions or emotions of another person e.g. their facial expressions.

  • The child will move their body/carry out the same act as their caregiver simultaneously, and the two are said to be synchronised.
  • This serves to sustain communication between the two caregiver and infant.


AO3:

Limitation of the research into caregiver infant interactions

  • Reliability of testing children.
  • This is because infants move their mouths and wave their arms constantly, which is an issue for researchers investigating intentional behaviour.
  • Therefore, we cannot be certain the infants were engaging in interactional synchrony/reciprocity as some of the behaviour may have occurred by chance.
  • This questions validity of research in relation to reciprocity and interactional synchrony and suggests that psychologists should be cautious when interpreting the findings’ from research in this area.


Methodological problems with studying interactional synchrony using observational methods

  • Possibility of observer bias where the researchers consciously or unconsciously interpret behaviour to support their findings. To address this problem, more than one observer should examine the inter observer reliability of the observations.
  • Koepke et al failed to replicate the findings of Meltzoff &Moore which suggests that their results of research examining is unreliable.


Further criticisms of Meltzoff and Moore research is that recent research had found that only securely attached infants engage in interactional synchrony.

  • Isabella et al found that the more securely attached the infant; the greater the level of synchrony.
  • This suggests that not all children engage in interactional synchrony and that Meltzoff & Moore’s original findings may have overlooked individual differences which could be a mediating factor.


Psychologists suggest caregiver infant interactions e.g. reciprocity are present from birth and therefore are the product of nature in order to help infants form and maintain an attachment.

  • However, such innate behaviours do not act in isolation and interact with the environment (caregivers) to prompt a response (e.g. attention).
  • Consequently, researchers should consider the interaction of innate infant behaviour with the environment (e.g. their caregivers) to fully appreciate and understand the complex nature of caregiver infant interactions.
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Betsy_Lou
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If you are studying AQA A Level psychology, here is my advice (my psychology teacher is an ex-exam paper marker):

• Yes, any combination: advantages, disadvantages or both.
• For 12 markers, aim for at least 3 well explained evaluation points.
• For 16 markers, aim for at least 5 well explained evaluation points.
• Always try to include 6 AO1 points.

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