Takeonme44
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I'm interested in the application of technology to biological organisms; e.g. working with amputees, and research into digitalising nerve impulses for bionic arms and such. I was just wondering what degree I should do, biotechnology is an obvious choice but is it so specialist that it could end up hindering me if I wanted to check out other options? I really don't want to do a pure biology degree so I have no idea what to study.
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Brownies&Ketchup
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Neuroscience might seem like the route to go to. I believe Birmingham does a Masters in what you may be interested in:

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Takeonme44
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(Original post by Brownies&Ketchup)
Neuroscience might seem like the route to go to. I believe Birmingham does a Masters in what you may be interested in:

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Cheers m9 ill check it out.
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University of Bath
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(Original post by Leog100)
I'm interested in the application of technology to biological organisms; e.g. working with amputees, and research into digitalising nerve impulses for bionic arms and such. I was just wondering what degree I should do, biotechnology is an obvious choice but is it so specialist that it could end up hindering me if I wanted to check out other options? I really don't want to do a pure biology degree so I have no idea what to study.
Hi

An option might be to look into Natural Sciences courses. These can vary massively from uni to uni, and be a bit confusing at first as to what it actually entails.

The Natsci course at Bath for example lets you study two sciences, with one major and one minor stream. (link here: http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/201...oglist-ug.html ) For example Physics major with biology minor. There are many other universities offering major and minor joint science degrees under different names (and I wouldn't be surprised if there was an engineering major, bio minor one out there either).

The reason why I suggest a physics major is because I myself am a student at Bath in my final year of a BSc Physics degree- and one of our final year courses is 'Medical Physics'- and we had many guest lecturers come in from the hospital to teach it. One of them worked on biotechnology for the NHS designing new implants etc.

The NHS offers graduate positions, where you work on rotation around their hospital departments, all the while studying for a Medical Physics masters. At the end of it, you choose which department you want to focus on. From what I remember, they were looking for physics, engineering and NatSci students.

I feel that perhaps a good route for you would be to study a bachelors degree in a joint-science/engineering subject and then specialise afterwards through a separate masters one year course, or via on-the-job training through a graduate scheme or internship. This way you won't be limiting yourself, and keeping all avenues open.

All the best in your search.
Lydia
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artful_lounger
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So, "Biotechnology" normally equates to genetic engineering of microbes e.g. bacteria etc. It definitely isn't the way to go if you're interested in prosthetics and similar. If you are more interested in the direct clinical side of creating and fitting prostheses to individual patients then you may want to consider a degree in Prosthetics & Orthotics, which is an allied health profession formally. However, based on what you've said I think Biomedical Engineering would be the best fit.

The study of for example materials and robotics for prosthetics and similar is actually a major area of research and industry in biomedical engineering, as well slow power electronics for use e.g. in peoples bodies as part of those prostheses or in for example pacemakers and similar things. There is some work in "neuroengineering" and matching of nerve impulses or brain waves etc to robotic prostheses is also an area being researched, although it's quite "high level" i.e. far from industrial application at this stage. These research groups tend to be pretty interdisciplinary, employing physicians, surgeons, engineers and scientists to work on different areas. As above Medical Physics may also be applicable - however this has a slightly narrower view of the "physical" side and includes a lot more on e.g. biomedical imaging and so on.
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