Different uni courses Watch

username3843068
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hello. I'm a GCSE student trying to understand how universities work.

Do some unis only teach the basics / really simple stuff and credit the same degree as better unis?

For example, you need AAA to get to uni X to do Computer Science.

For University Y, you need CCD to get in, to also do Computer Science.


Wouldn't University Y have to teach much easier / simpler stuff as the people there only got C's at A level and therefore don't have much knowledge of computer science nor maths?

So how would the qualifications be different? Because surely after the 3-4 years the people at uni X have more in depth knowledge?
1
reply
username3843068
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#2
Help?
0
reply
HT2412
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by 12390859081)
Hello. I'm a GCSE student trying to understand how universities work.

Do some unis only teach the basics / really simple stuff and credit the same degree as better unis?

For example, you need AAA to get to uni X to do Computer Science.

For University Y, you need CCD to get in, to also do Computer Science.


Wouldn't University Y have to teach much easier / simpler stuff as the people there only got C's at A level and therefore don't have much knowledge of computer science nor maths?

So how would the qualifications be different? Because surely after the 3-4 years the people at uni X have more in depth knowledge?
Hi!
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
1
reply
username3843068
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#4
s
(Original post by HT2412)
Hi! So different universities can actually teach different things. For example, in my subject (History) University X might offer a module on the History of Buddhism while University Y doesn't. This is less true with the sciences, but can still happen.

University X would most probably have a much more intensive programme of study so it would be more difficult to get a higher grade. So a 1:1 from University X would be more difficult to attain than a 1:1 from University Y. University Y will also teach the foundation knowledge, perhaps through more compulsory modules in year 1 or even in a foundation year, while University X will expect you to know them, but still offer support outside of the course if you don't. Hope this helps
Okay, so assuming both universities teach the same things, basically, its just the easier university to get into will teach simpler stuff? Also, because its much harder to get a better grade, would a lower grade but from uni X be more valued than a 1st or whatever from uni Y?
0
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by 12390859081)
Okay, so assuming both universities teach the same things, basically, its just the easier university to get into will teach simpler stuff? Also, because its much harder to get a better grade, would a lower grade but from uni X be more valued than a 1st or whatever from uni Y?
All universities teaching, for example, Computer Science will teach fairly similar things. The difference in entry requirements is mostly due to the popularity of the university.

A 1st from university X is generally as valued as a 1st from university Y.

Some universities put more emphasis on end of year exams than on coursework - that can be a key difference in university "style". Also things might move a bit more quickly at the "harder" university because you will be expected to keep up better.

Are you sitting your GCSEs this summer?
2
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
Also note that one statement above is incorrect. University X with the hogh entry requirements will normally award a LOT more firsts and more 2:1s than university Y. You can look up proportions on unistats to see this.

There’s a very small number of courses/universities that have high entry requirements and are noted for being particularly mean with handing out firsts.
1
reply
PQ
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
Oh and if university Y has a placement year then it will often be preferred by employers compared to university X.
0
reply
Jazzyboy
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by PQ)
Also note that one statement above is incorrect. University X with the hogh entry requirements will normally award a LOT more firsts and more 2:1s than university Y. You can look up proportions on unistats to see this.

There’s a very small number of courses/universities that have high entry requirements and are noted for being particularly mean with handing out firsts.
How can you be sure that the higher proportion of firsts isn't simply due to University X having more committed students though? Those stats don't really tell you for sure that the university is more lax in its standards for firsts. All it tells you is that for whatever reason, that university is awarding more firsts and 2:1s. We don't know what the reason is.

You make a good point on placement years though. For Computer Science especially, if you can find a scheme that includes a placement year, that's a pretty big perk.

E: Oh, incase I misunderstood your first point, I'll just note that if you're just disagreeing with HT2412, then I guess I agree with you xD. Universities are regulated by a national board(now the OfS, I believe), so they have to hold fairly similar standards for their degree schemes. No university should be necessarily 'harder' to succeed in than another, though obviously there may be variations due to different teaching styles.
0
reply
username3843068
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by Doonesbury)
All universities teaching, for example, Computer Science will teach fairly similar things. The difference in entry requirements is mostly due to the popularity of the university.

A 1st from university X is generally as valued as a 1st from university Y.

Some universities put more emphasis on end of year exams than on coursework - that can be a key difference in university "style". Also things might move a bit more quickly at the "harder" university because you will be expected to keep up better.

Are you sitting your GCSEs this summer?
Yes I am.

I dont understand though how will they teach similar things when people at Y got C in Maths, C in Computing Sci and D in whatever, surely that means that their mathematical ability is limited and so is their knowledge of computer science? vs somewhere like good russell group unis where they need atleast an A in comp sci and a A in maths?

or will it just be that eventually the people at Y will catch up and at the end of the 3/4 years they will have learnt the same things as in depth? If so, wouldn't that mean that unversity Y would be way harder as they have to learn more things in the same ammount of time?
0
reply
Doones
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by 12390859081)
Yes I am.

I dont understand though how will they teach similar things when people at Y got C in Maths, C in Computing Sci and D in whatever, surely that means that their mathematical ability is limited and so is their knowledge of computer science? vs somewhere like good russell group unis where they need atleast an A in comp sci and a A in maths?

or will it just be that eventually the people at Y will catch up and at the end of the 3/4 years they will have learnt the same things as in depth? If so, wouldn't that mean that unversity Y would be way harder as they have to learn more things in the same ammount of time?
You will probably find the CCD course is IT not CompSci. CompSci courses usually ask for a good grade in A-level maths.

But also, many universities do provide additional help in maths for those students that need it. Similarly they also provide language learning resources.
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
HT2412
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 year ago
#11
(Original post by Jazzyboy)
How can you be sure that the higher proportion of firsts isn't simply due to University X having more committed students though? Those stats don't really tell you for sure that the university is more lax in its standards for firsts. All it tells you is that for whatever reason, that university is awarding more firsts and 2:1s. We don't know what the reason is.

You make a good point on placement years though. For Computer Science especially, if you can find a scheme that includes a placement year, that's a pretty big perk.

E: Oh, incase I misunderstood your first point, I'll just note that if you're just disagreeing with HT2412, then I guess I agree with you xD. Universities are regulated by a national board(now the OfS, I believe), so they have to hold fairly similar standards for their degree schemes. No university should be necessarily 'harder' to succeed in than another, though obviously there may be variations due to different teaching styles.
I've just read over my first response and think I've managed to even confuse myself! It made sense in my head, honest! I've deleted my post (or what I can of it) to prevent future confusion to anyone else who comes across this. Sorry folks! 🙄
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Jazzyboy
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 year ago
#12
(Original post by 12390859081)
Yes I am.

I dont understand though how will they teach similar things when people at Y got C in Maths, C in Computing Sci and D in whatever, surely that means that their mathematical ability is limited and so is their knowledge of computer science? vs somewhere like good russell group unis where they need atleast an A in comp sci and a A in maths?

or will it just be that eventually the people at Y will catch up and at the end of the 3/4 years they will have learnt the same things as in depth? If so, wouldn't that mean that unversity Y would be way harder as they have to learn more things in the same ammount of time?
I'm at a uni that doesn't require any grades in A-Level Maths to do Comp Sci, and yes, people do struggle. The uni offers an optional module in the 1st semester so that we could catch up on maths skills and knowledge though, so that helped a lot for those of us that chose that module.

Keep in mind though that students are perfectly capable of educating themselves on topics they didn't do in A-Levels, independently. At any university, you will probably struggle if you don't do some independent learning. At the end of the day, whether at degree is 'hard' doesn't necessarily depend on your past qualifications, but on how much you've actually studied. If universities offer the same degree scheme, they're not likely to make the degree harder for all students. They should offer some additional support for those that need it, but they don't slow down the course just so that people without the necessary skills don't lag behind.

So tldr; the university won't make anything harder deliberately, but obviously some people will find any degree harder than others, but that's on an individual level. Those that struggle would probably struggle no matter where they go.
0
reply
username3843068
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#13
(Original post by Jazzyboy)
I'm at a uni that doesn't require any grades in A-Level Maths to do Comp Sci, and yes, people do struggle. The uni offers an optional module in the 1st semester so that we could catch up on maths skills and knowledge though, so that helped a lot for those of us that chose that module.

Keep in mind though that students are perfectly capable of educating themselves on topics they didn't do in A-Levels, independently. At any university, you will probably struggle if you don't do some independent learning. At the end of the day, whether at degree is 'hard' doesn't necessarily depend on your past qualifications, but on how much you've actually studied. If universities offer the same degree scheme, they're not likely to make the degree harder for all students. They should offer some additional support for those that need it, but they don't slow down the course just so that people without the necessary skills don't lag behind.

So tldr; the university won't make anything harder deliberately, but obviously some people will find any degree harder than others, but that's on an individual level. Those that struggle would probably struggle no matter where they go.
But surely the things you learn are less in depth , compared to some other russell group / oxbridge uni where the people there have very strong math skills
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts

All the exam results help you need

1,829

people online now

225,530

students helped last year
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Aberdeen
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Tue, 27 Aug '19
  • Norwich University of the Arts
    Postgraduate (MA) Open Day Postgraduate
    Sat, 31 Aug '19
  • University of Lincoln
    Guardian Offices, Kings Cross, London Postgraduate
    Mon, 2 Sep '19

How are you feeling about GCSE Results Day?

Hopeful (221)
12.46%
Excited (166)
9.36%
Worried (309)
17.43%
Terrified (390)
22%
Meh (186)
10.49%
Confused (39)
2.2%
Putting on a brave face (244)
13.76%
Impatient (218)
12.3%

Watched Threads

View All