Police are ‘trained to hide vital evidence’

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AngeryPenguin
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The scale of the failure by police and prosecutors to disclose vital evidence in criminal cases is exposed today in documents showing that such behaviour is routine and deliberate.

A dossier seen by The Times reveals a commonly held view that the defence is not entitled to see all the evidence. It discloses the tactics used to stop it being handed over, with officers in at least one force apparently trained in how to avoid making available material that might undermine their case.

The file draws on the reports of 14 focus groups with the police, and others with prosecutors and judges, as well as a survey of prosecutors.

The findings come after this newspaper reported on a series of rape cases that collapsed at the eleventh hour when evidence was passed to defence lawyers. The comments in the dossier include one prosecutor saying: “In even quite serious cases, officers have admitted to deliberately withholding sensitive material from us and they frequently approach us only a week before trial. Officers are reluctant to investigate a defence or take statements that might assist the defence or undermine our case.”

Among the comments from police focus groups was: “If you don’t want the defence to see it, then [evidence] goes on the MG6D” — a reference to the list of sensitive unused material to which the defence does not have access. In another focus group, an inspector noted that police “have been trained to put items on there that they do not want disclosed to the defence”. This tactic was confirmed by prosecutors. One recorded comment was that “officers put undermining material on the MG6D list to hide”.

In one report on focus groups with judges, the inspectors note a judge saying: “There seems to be an idea that the defence is not entitled to see things but where the defence press matters, this yields results.”

Prosecutors are also at fault. Sometimes this is because of what one called a “hugely excessive and complex caseload, insufficient time to do the job, poor-quality and slow digital systems, poor-quality investigation by police [and] wrong prioritising of objectives by the organisation”.

The dossier was obtained by the Centre for Criminal Appeals, a charity, under a freedom of information request to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) Inspectorate and the Inspectorate of Constabulary, which collated the unpublished comments when preparing a joint report on disclosure of evidence last year.

It makes clear that the failure to hand over evidence that may undermine the prosecution case is often deliberate.

Last week the CPS and police inspectors gave evidence to the Commons justice select committee. Kevin McGinty, chief inspector of the CPS, said disclosure failings were the single most frequent cause in the steady stream of miscarriages of justice. He described a culture in which disclosure was seen not as part of an investigation but “more of an administrative exercise”.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/p...ence-cnfdbm6jz
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mojojojo101
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When was this not the case...


ACAB
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Monkey say
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This is why innocent men go to jail.

Feminism has lot to answer for.
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username1738683
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What is frightening is how they get away with it, were it being done to women and the resignations would be in droves to appease the 'public outrage'.
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AngeryPenguin
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(Original post by Monkey say)
This is why innocent men go to jail.

Feminism has lot to answer for.
This goes well beyond feminism. It isn't like the police establishment are ardent feminists. If there were no moral panic over rapes, making a pressure to lock up more rapists and 'rapists', I daresay that the police higher-ups would be pressuring officers to ignore rape accusations.

What with Rotherham, Rochdale, Derby, Telford, Oxford, etc., Hillsborough, infiltrating environmentalist groups and trade unions, there seems to be a culture of ignoring crime to make their lives easier, fudging figures, and conspiracy at the top of the police force.
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InnerTemple
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There just isn’t the time or resource to do proper disclosure.

Think about the recent failed prosecutions and you’ll probably see that many, if not all, involved failure to disclose material which was held in digital form. Digital evidence makes up an increasingly large portion of all evidence in a criminal case. Take a mobile phone - this one device could hold the equivalent of a small library of material. There is no way that detectives are looking through everything, registering it, deciding whether it’s disclosable etc. They’re simply too busy.

Is the malicious retention of material common place? I don’t think so. Is important material getting overlooked by overstretched and sometimes poorly trained police officers? Yes.
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AngeryPenguin
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(Original post by InnerTemple)
There just isn’t the time or resource to do proper disclosure.
Actively hiding the evidence (as they have been doing) to push a conviction that they know is on shaky ground takes more resources than disclosing it.

Think about the recent failed prosecutions and you’ll probably see that many, if not all, involved failure to disclose material which was held in digital form. Digital evidence makes up an increasingly large portion of all evidence in a criminal case. Take a mobile phone - this one device could hold the equivalent of a small library of material. There is no way that detectives are looking through everything, registering it, deciding whether it’s disclosable etc. They’re simply too busy.

Is the malicious retention of material common place? I don’t think so. Is important material getting overlooked by overstretched and sometimes poorly trained police officers? Yes.
Read the article. It makes it very clear that this is not a case of police simply overlooking the evidence, but actively hiding it.
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Napp
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And this is why one doesnt trust the pigs in Britain.
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999tigger
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(Original post by InnerTemple)
There just isn’t the time or resource to do proper disclosure.

Think about the recent failed prosecutions and you’ll probably see that many, if not all, involved failure to disclose material which was held in digital form. Digital evidence makes up an increasingly large portion of all evidence in a criminal case. Take a mobile phone - this one device could hold the equivalent of a small library of material. There is no way that detectives are looking through everything, registering it, deciding whether it’s disclosable etc. They’re simply too busy.

Is the malicious retention of material common place? I don’t think so. Is important material getting overlooked by overstretched and sometimes poorly trained police officers? Yes.
Quite, but you would need to know what you were talking about to post something like that. Much better to go for the conspiracy rather than under resourcing.
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Sekato
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Police have a system to send some information to the CPS with a note telling them to assess any potentially unwanted outcomes (so that personal information does't end up in the defence's hands illegally. Usually third party witnesses get their details stored like this, for example, to avoid witness intimidation. This is all perfectly legal, but sometimes information gets misfiled, and the prosecutor takes the police ''you may want to think twice about sharing this data'' file and just assumes that it's all confidential, leading to the situation here. Except now news sites have seen a chance to claim corruption, so it's apparently a big deal now
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n a m e l e s s
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No ****. And this thread is unpopular on here. Wonder why. This crowd doesnt seem to be the type to care about important matters after all. They seem to like threads about "rating pics" more.
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