Politics and French Revision Help

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#1
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#1
Hi. I study maths, french and politics for CCEA and am having trouble with studying. I know what to do for maths, the one I like the least. But for the other two I am confused. I have no idea what I should be doing to study for french. I don't know if I should be making notes or doing papers. As for politics, I love the subject and feel that I know nearly all the material, excluding examples for my essays. Again what should I do for revision, should I be making notes? Also, with regards to essays is it better to write out the 4 possible ones that there would be for each unit and if so, how do I go about learning them. I have no idea what to do for french essays either, as they can be based on any theme in the film.

French movie- Manon des Sources
Politics Units N.Ireland and British
Maths Units C1 C2 M1

If anyone could answers one of my million questions that would make a good start. In short, how do I go about revising for these subjects.
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JeSuisBaguette
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Hi there, I'm sorry you haven't received any earlier replies. I'm hoping I can be of help in regards to French as I am currently studying it at A-Level and just really love the subject.

Essentially there are 4 main sections of learning a language (Reading, listening, writing and speaking) plus grammar! I will talk you through what I do for each section as it is probably the easiest thing!

Reading: Okay, so for this you're going to want to find/make a list of vocab that you need to know for your exams. This is the main way to get through a reading paper. Then I like to use Quizlet or Anki both of which you can get on your phone and online and keep practicing the vocab you have imported. If you're doing a specific qualification, someone has probably already uploaded vocab lists for you. If you can find any do past papers, mark it, and then highlight all the vocab you didn't know and any topics in particular you don't understand. I'm on a new A-Level specification so there are no past papers, so I like to read the news consistently in French, and print off specific articles linked to my studies and then do with them as I would with a past paper.

Listening: Probably my favourite bit to revise. I like to listen to french radio (This article is excellent for recommending stations based on your learning goal! https://frenchtogether.com/french-radio/). Additionally, I watch a lot of french films and TV shows either with english, french or no subtitles (La Mante and No Second Chance on Netflix are both awesome). I also use the websites TF1 and 6play to watch tv. (The Voice France is incredible and they're currently broadcasting their 7th series. It's a great way to discover new music too.) I find that anything that helps with listening also helps with the speaking aspect.

Speaking: Pretty much the same as for listening but focus on being able to re-create the pronunciation and intonation of the speakers. Also, listening to French music and learning the lyrics to sing along can be a great confidence booster (Here are some useful playlists <https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...-eCPVnxXZ3L2o-> <https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...vq0uqSN1RRmFol>. I would recommend taking 5/10 minutes as often as you like to record yourself speaking, eg. describe what you did today, and listen back to it to hear your mistakes and improve.

Writing: This is probably the easiest one to improve on but the hardest to practice. If you can find practice essay questions I'd do them, and hand them to a teacher to mark it. The writing aspect is very closely linked to grammar and the vocab part of the reading. Make sure you're confident on how to structure different tenses, and as a priority make sure you know etre, avoir, aller, devoir, pouvoir, faire, vouloir and savoir off by hear in as many tenses as possible (no really this will help a ton!)

Grammar: As I said above, learning really essential verb conjugations is a must. The only real way to improve grammar is by doing worksheets and exercises. There are so many grammar workbooks you can buy. There is also youtube for bits you really don't understand. Once you've mastered the grammar (not completely obviously, but just to a good standard) you'll find that everything else will become so much easier. Without grammar everything falls apart.

Sorry for the long answer but I hope this has given you some ideas to try out! Good luck xx
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#3
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Thanks. I just find it so difficult to know what to do when you have a language, as well as a subject you feel you know everything for. Any other help/tips are appreciated. The whole essay situation for french/politics is what bothers me the most. But what I need to know the most, and the most basic question, should I be making revision notes? Even if I feel confident with the spec material
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