Conflicting information on Domains and Kingdoms? Watch

Carboniferous
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Just a slight confusion on the placement of domains and kingdoms.
For example, in my school textbook it states that there are 3 domains, these being Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea.
However, it also states that one kingdom is Prokaryotae/Monera.
This is not the first time I have seen prokaryotae shown as a kingdom, instead of being split into two domains, being bacteria and archaea.
Does anyone know the current correct status quo?
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eloquent45
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(Original post by Carboniferous)
Just a slight confusion on the placement of domains and kingdoms.
For example, in my school textbook it states that there are 3 domains, these being Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea.
However, it also states that one kingdom is Prokaryotae/Monera.
This is not the first time I have seen prokaryotae shown as a kingdom, instead of being split into two domains, being bacteria and archaea.
Does anyone know the current correct status quo?
The “prokaryote/monera” kingdom you stated there is actually the outdated version of the 5 kingdoms (animal, plant, fungi, protist and monera/bacteria/prokaryote), before the development of the 3 domains system. Now, the first 4 kingdoms are assigned to Eukaryote domain and the last is classified into the Eubacteria domain. Now that we know some microorganisms are none of the two (difference in protein synthesis machinery, type of plasma membrane lipid, etc), these organisms are then classified as Archaea. Does this make sense to you?
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Carboniferous
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(Original post by eloquent45)
The “prokaryote/monera” kingdom you stated there is actually the outdated version of the 5 kingdoms (animal, plant, fungi, protist and monera/bacteria/prokaryote), before the development of the 3 domains system. Now, the first 4 kingdoms are assigned to Eukaryote domain and the last is classified into the Eubacteria domain. Now that we know some microorganisms are none of the two (difference in protein synthesis machinery, type of plasma membrane lipid, etc), these organisms are then classified as Archaea. Does this make sense to you?
Yes it does thank you!
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