psychology, external validity

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riya89
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#1
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#1
if something lacks munade realism and ecological validity does it have high or low external validity due to extraneous variablesalso what are extraneous variables...
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random_matt
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#2
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Low.
Variables which are not your IV and DV, remember you are only looking for an effect that the IV has on DV. Extraneous variables are ones you are not testing/unaware of which may be effecting the outcome.
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riya89
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#3
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(Original post by random_matt)
Low.
Variables which are not your IV and DV, remember you are only looking for an effect that the IV has on DV. Extraneous variables are ones you are not testing/unaware of which may be effecting the outcome.
so to establish cause and effect..?
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random_matt
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#4
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#4
To have cause and effect, you need to acertain than the IV had an effect on the DV.
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riya89
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#5
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#5
(Original post by random_matt)
To have cause and effect, you need to acertain than the IV had an effect on the DV.
im confused, but thanks for the help
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random_matt
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#6
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#6
(Original post by riya89)
im confused, but thanks for the help
What are you confused about? It's probably my fault, i'm very bad at helping and explaining. I can help with examples if you lliike.
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Biomed1018
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#7
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#7
To have cause and effect (causality), the IV should be the only variable to have the direct effect on the DV.
Extraneous variables are variables other than the IV affecting the DV.
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riya89
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#8
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(Original post by random_matt)
What are you confused about? It's probably my fault, i'm very bad at helping and explaining. I can help with examples if you lliike.
haha not your fault,
just like eg. A03 for a lab based experiment
how would you set out the answer
like a template
like if it lacked ecological validity and mundane realism could u say because its an artifical environment, not everyday life so cannot generalise to real life setting therefore low external validity?? idk like how to set it out
or how to know if it has extraenous variables etc..
idk its a lot to answer sorry :/
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riya89
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#9
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#9
(Original post by random_matt)
What are you confused about? It's probably my fault, i'm very bad at helping and explaining. I can help with examples if you lliike.
can u give an example pls?
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Biomed1018
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#10
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#10
(Original post by riya89)
haha not your fault,
just like eg. A03 for a lab based experiment
how would you set out the answer
like a template
like if it lacked ecological validity and mundane realism could u say because its an artifical environment, not everyday life so cannot generalise to real life setting therefore low external validity?? idk like how to set it out
or how to know if it has extraenous variables etc..
idk its a lot to answer sorry :/
Yeah you could say the enviroment was artifical, so cannot be generalised. like Asch's line study which was based on trivial response of identifying lines.
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soIiIoquy
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#11
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#11
low external validity
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random_matt
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#12
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#12
Let's say you wanted to measure the effects of stress (IV) on heart rate (DV), and decided the best course of action to test this would be a within designed study, finding out if people get stresses by viewing decaptitations. Firstly, how are you measuring stress? Let's say you decided to show your partcipants a very popular horror movie where an individual gets decapitated by some psycho (making it up, sounds pretty ****), and then obviously measure the partcipants heart rate, the DV. For arguments sake, all the people are carbon copies in terms of heart health etc, they all have the same baseline beats per min etc. After doing your test, you find that every individual's heart rate went up, but not very significantly, and you conclude that this horror **** show was not particulary stressful. Do you conclude that viewed dismemberment does not actually make people stressed? Of course not, my example is ****, and already pointed out it is POPULAR, people have likely already seen it, read up on it etc, potentially a extraneous variable right there? What about gender? Perhaps men are more hardcore than women, who knows. You mentioned articial, yep, this is an artificial study in terms this is not watching a real world event. Would you **** a brick if you saw this in real life?
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random_matt
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Damn, how did i get a first in psyc year one? LOL. My dissertation going to be interesting.
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riya89
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#14
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#14
(Original post by random_matt)
Let's say you wanted to measure the effects of stress (IV) on heart rate (DV), and decided the best course of action to test this would be a within designed study, finding out if people get stresses by viewing decaptitations. Firstly, how are you measuring stress? Let's say you decided to show your partcipants a very popular horror movie where an individual gets decapitated by some psycho (making it up, sounds pretty ****), and then obviously measure the partcipants heart rate, the DV. For arguments sake, all the people are carbon copies in terms of heart health etc, they all have the same baseline beats per min etc. After doing your test, you find that every individual's heart rate went up, but not very significantly, and you conclude that this horror **** show was not particulary stressful. Do you conclude that viewed dismemberment does not actually make people stressed? Of course not, my example is ****, and already pointed out it is POPULAR, people have likely already seen it, read up on it etc, potentially a extraneous variable right there? What about gender? Perhaps men are more hardcore than women, who knows. You mentioned articial, yep, this is an artificial study in terms this is not watching a real world event. Would you **** a brick if you saw this in real life?

ohhhhhhhh that makes so much sense,
thank you!!
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riya89
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#15
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#15
(Original post by random_matt)
Damn, how did i get a first in psyc year one? LOL. My dissertation going to be interesting.
haha, im sure you'll be fine!
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random_matt
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#16
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#16
I just thought of a really good one, but never submitted. I'm not writing it again, but have found something you may find useful, and is more or less what i had thought of.

Let’s say that an educational psychologist has developed a new learning strategy and is interested in examining the effectiveness of this strategy. The experimenter randomly assigns students to two groups. All of the students study text materials on a biology topic for thirty minutes. One group uses the new strategy and the other uses a strategy of their choice. Then all students complete a test over the materials. One obvious confounding variable in this case would be pre-knowledge of the biology topic that was studied. This variable will most likely influence student scores, regardless of which strategy they use. Because of this extraneous variable (and surely others) there will be some spread within each of the groups. It would be better, of course, if all students came in with the exact same pre-knowledge. However, the experimenter has taken an important step to greatly increase the chances that, at least, the extraneous variable will add error variance equivalently between the two groups. That is, the experimenter randomly assigned students to the two groups.

Random assignment is a powerful tool though it does nothing to decrease the amount of error that occurs as a result of extraneous variables, in only equalizes it between groups. In fact, even if the experimenter gave a pre-knowledge test ahead of time and then assigned students to groups, so that the groups were as equal as possible on pre-knowledge scores, this still would not change the fact that students would differ one from the other in terms of pre-knowledge and this would add "error variance" in the experiment.
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