How can E-Z isomerism occur if there is restricted rotation about the double bond? Watch

020200
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^^^ This confuses me a little. Can someone explain?

Thanks!
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RickHendricks
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(Original post by 020200)
^^^ This confuses me a little. Can someone explain?

Thanks!
the basis of an E/Z isomerism is that the in E- the group with the larger atomic number are across from each other, and in Z- the group with larger atomic number are in line with each other.

However, if the groups are free to rotate around the C=C bond, then the idea of an E/Z isomerism would not even exist.

Therefore E/Z isomerism only occurs when there is restricted rotation about the C=C, because without that rotation, the groups are free to rotate around the Carbon bond, meaning that there would not be an isomerism in the first place.
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charco
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(Original post by 020200)
^^^ This confuses me a little. Can someone explain?

Thanks!
It is because of restricted (no) rotation that both "sides" of the double bond are non-equivalent positions. Think about the four corners of a rectangle ABCD.

A is at the same "end" as B, and C is at the same "end" as D

So there are two possibiities:

1. A is on the same long side as C,
2. A is on the same long side as D.
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020200
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Perfect! Got it. Thanks!
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