Paying people to do your coursework.... Watch

This discussion is closed.
e^iπ
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#21
Report 1 year ago
#21
(Original post by barrellc)
and i think thats awful, we pay a similar amount (at least at my uni it is similar) to post grads, we should be entitled to the same amount of care. It infuriates me that people continue to get away with these things
Out of curiosity, what course are you doing, I find that this isn't a problem in STEM roles as if you somehow cheated, you would be shooting yourself in the foot.
0
DrawTheLine
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#22
Report 1 year ago
#22
(Original post by barrellc)
They have argued to me in the past that the skills we gain on our degree arent that relevant anyway so it wouldnt affect them... and in some ways i agree with that, im not sure how relevant any degree is if its not medical or science based...
That's a pretty rubbish argument from them. If the skills aren't relevant than why even bother doing a degree if they're getting nothing out of it except debt and paper. I will never understand people who cheat. I can kind of agree too but personally I've already learned so much and I've not even finished first year yet.
0
999tigger
Badges: 19
#23
Report 1 year ago
#23
(Original post by barrellc)
I wouldnt do it, I wouldnt be able to say i earned my degree if i did. But its so easy for them to get away with it, and i dont understand why people do it :/
Mmmm ok then. Why not ask the people who do it? Alternatively if yu know people are doing it, then you could report them assuming you have evidence.
0
username2337287
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#24
Report 1 year ago
#24
Coursework is irrelvant and a flaw to the education system, hence why it was largely removed from the majority of respectable subjects. Teachers cheat, not the student. Teachers give all the answers, the system is easily corruptable and broken. Paying others to do the coursework is equivalent to doing it in a school, where teachers install the answers into your work and practically compelte the work for you.
1
barrellc
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#25
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#25
(Original post by e^iπ)
Out of curiosity, what course are you doing, I find that this isn't a problem in STEM roles as if you somehow cheated, you would be shooting yourself in the foot.
I study business management, so all our modules are completely different; meaning different tutors. I know of other courses but they do all tend to be around this faculty
0
barrellc
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#26
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#26
(Original post by 999tigger)
Mmmm ok then. Why not ask the people who do it? Alternatively if yu know people are doing it, then you could report them assuming you have evidence.
I have tried to but its a bit of an awkward conversation to have. Plus I wouldnt want to be that person the dobs someone in, but it is a tempting thought...
0
barrellc
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#27
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#27
(Original post by DrawTheLine)
That's a pretty rubbish argument from them. If the skills aren't relevant than why even bother doing a degree if they're getting nothing out of it except debt and paper. I will never understand people who cheat. I can kind of agree too but personally I've already learned so much and I've not even finished first year yet.
Well in the grand scale of things i think quite a few degrees arent that relevant, I study business and although some bits I could probably extrapolate and use in an office for the most part it is fairly inapplicable.. a lot of grad schemes ive seen now dont even care what degree youve done as they know it doesnt really apply
0
barrellc
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#28
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#28
(Original post by Jack22031994)
Its cheating and technically fraud so they should be kicked out.
technically yeah, but it doesnt seem to happen, I know people in final year now who have done it since first year :/
0
Jack22031994
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#29
Report 1 year ago
#29
(Original post by barrellc)
technically yeah, but it doesnt seem to happen, I know people in final year now who have done it since first year :/
Yeah and its annoying as I worked my butt off for my degree
1
NonIndigenous
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#30
Report 1 year ago
#30
(Original post by barrellc)
I know quite a few people that have started paying people online to do their coursework for them; either because they've got other stuff on or they just cant be bothered.
I don't get why you would want to do it, because surely it is no longer your degree.
What are your thoughts?
I'm of two minds about it. There are some instances where the coursework I've been set was so utterly crap and poorly thought out, with no teaching support, that I regret not paying someone in China to do it for me.

If I feel like I can learn something from it, effectively and efficiently (which requires various other prerequisites to be satisfied... such as teaching support), then I'm pretty enthusiastic about it. Otherwise I'm just like... wtf is this.

Respect is a two way thing. If some lecturers can't even muster up basic courtesy of explaining what the coursework is about and don't give straightforward answers to questions on that front, then I'm hardly prepared to waste my time doing their job for them. Technically it's also a breach of contract... though I don't by default look for a fight, so will settle for whatever solution there is that gets me out of the woods the soonest. If it means paying someone else... I'd be prepared to. I have not done that for quite some time though.

When I studied in Poland, it was not so simple. They ask you questions on the coursework when you are handing it in, to make sure it is in fact your work. There were a few occasions where someone else, ahem, 'helped' me with the tedious bits of a coursework, in exchange for a 'favor'... but I could always answer the questions because at the end of the day I did the brainwork and understood the design principles. For example, some lecturers demanded coursework to be hand-written. F88k that. I did it on PC (10x faster to work with, edit, etc. you know), then paid someone with similar writing to hand write it for me. This sort of antiquated teaching style irritates me when there are much better methods today for comparison, and I don't pay it any respects.

I'm doing engineering, which should lend some context to what I've said.

There are some students that just buy everything they can because they get too much allowance from their parents. I've completed coursework for other students in exchange for money as well this way. Their loss, my gain, I don't care.
0
e^iπ
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#31
Report 1 year ago
#31
But as was mentioned earlier, most jobs do not require knowledge gained from a degree.so therefore it's possible that out of two people, both equally capable of doing a job well bit one has a higher degree classification due to cheating gets the job. As another poster said, coursework had no place in university education (and for that matter school education).

This is why humanity degrees are a waste IMO
0
barrellc
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#32
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#32
That is a good point, which would be true if any employer had the time to actually read applications. Statistically employers spend 15 seconds looking at a CV, because they have so many coming through. I think for the most part the process is automated and just kicks people out based on items such as 'what is your degree and what was the grade', the system is presumably trying to narrow it down to a few CVs in order to save the company time, so maybe people that are more deserving get kicked out of the runnings over someone who cheated.
0
barrellc
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#33
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#33
(Original post by NonIndigenous)
I'm of two minds about it. There are some instances where the coursework I've been set was so utterly crap and poorly thought out, with no teaching support, that I regret not paying someone in China to do it for me.

If I feel like I can learn something from it, effectively and efficiently (which requires various other prerequisites to be satisfied... such as teaching support), then I'm pretty enthusiastic about it. Otherwise I'm just like... wtf is this.

Respect is a two way thing. If some lecturers can't even muster up basic courtesy of explaining what the coursework is about and don't give straightforward answers to questions on that front, then I'm hardly prepared to waste my time doing their job for them. Technically it's also a breach of contract... though I don't by default look for a fight, so will settle for whatever solution there is that gets me out of the woods the soonest. If it means paying someone else... I'd be prepared to. I have not done that for quite some time though.

When I studied in Poland, it was not so simple. They ask you questions on the coursework when you are handing it in, to make sure it is in fact your work. There were a few occasions where someone else, ahem, 'helped' me with the tedious bits of a coursework, in exchange for a 'favor'... but I could always answer the questions because at the end of the day I did the brainwork and understood the design principles. For example, some lecturers demanded coursework to be hand-written. F88k that. I did it on PC (10x faster to work with, edit, etc. you know), then paid someone with similar writing to hand write it for me. This sort of antiquated teaching style irritates me when there are much better methods today for comparison, and I don't pay it any respects.

I'm doing engineering, which should lend some context to what I've said.

There are some students that just buy everything they can because they get too much allowance from their parents. I've completed coursework for other students in exchange for money as well this way. Their loss, my gain, I don't care.
I completely agree that some of thee wok we receive is pointless, but is that not something that we have to get used to? as in the working world oour boss will likely do the same every now and then.

I think thats quite a good system, but it could be avoided by just reading the work that you paid for. Writing up by had is such a waste of time though!

Overall though, do you not feel like the 'help' you received has taken away that the degree is truly yours?
0
Kindred
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#34
Report 1 year ago
#34
BIG NO NO. Not only is it pathetic and wrong, but by doing it you're risking being found out and having all your work thrown out.
Imagine how lucrative it could be getting paid to do coursework for people them blackmailing them with threats of turning them in.
0
barrellc
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#35
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#35
(Original post by Kindred)
BIG NO NO. Not only is it pathetic and wrong, but by doing it you're risking being found out and having all your work thrown out.
Imagine how lucrative it could be getting paid to do coursework for people them blackmailing them with threats of turning them in.
They would have brought that upon themselves I suppose, but I have yet to hear one story, from someone I know, where it has gone wrong
0
NonIndigenous
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#36
Report 1 year ago
#36
(Original post by barrellc)
I completely agree that some of thee wok we receive is pointless, but is that not something that we have to get used to? as in the working world oour boss will likely do the same every now and then.
To a lesser degree, but it will always be true yes. Any boss that sets his employees pointless work though, will end up bankrupting their own company. So there is a strong incentive for them not to do it. Lecturers... not so much, because there is no monetary incentive for them. Besides, if I find myself doing very repetitive and boring work, I take the initiative to find a way to make it less repetitive. It may be learning macros in Excel to automate certain tasks for example, or speaking with someone else in the office whose already done something similar before and has a better method figured out.

In the greater scheme of things... many UK companies subcontract tedious, manual work to firms abroad that are a lot cheaper to employ for these tasks, whilst the UK companies do the 'higher-level' tasks that require more brainwork instead of trotting out the same calculations or drawings for the nth time like an automaton.

(Original post by barrellc)
I think thats quite a good system, but it could be avoided by just reading the work that you paid for. Writing up by had is such a waste of time though!
I don't think it's quite as easy as just 'reading the work'. How many times did you understand what you read in a textbook, the first time you read it? I usually walk away with just as many questions, new ones. To answer questions properly, you need to have a bit more depth of knowledge to reason with than just what is written in the coursework.

(Original post by barrellc)
Overall though, do you not feel like the 'help' you received has taken away that the degree is truly yours?
Not really, though it's very subjective. I value my time. Not going to waste it on one subject just because it's disorganized if I can spend it better on another subject. When I have resorted to paying for some parts of my coursework to be done for me, I did not do it simply so I'd have more time to drink beer instead.
1
NonIndigenous
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#37
Report 1 year ago
#37
It really is something I feel strongly about: value of time. I value it higher than I value money. Most choices I make, or calculations I do on paper that involve budgeting, revolve around time moreso than money for me.

The only money I need is to pay for the basics, essentials, or whatever I need to work productively (such as 3 extra flat monitors on my desk, which isn't cheap to be fair, but my work requires it, and a fking expensive laptop for graphics work). Extras to that are luxuries. I don't need to spend a lot of money to entertain myself, so am not motivated to work harder to earn such a surplus (though there are other reasons). I prefer to spend the time differently, reading things I find interesting, spend it with people I value in my life, etc.
0
Hobo-Joe
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#38
Report 1 year ago
#38
(Original post by barrellc)
If there was enough jobs to go around I would totally agree, but its likely that those 2 people will be directly competing for roles, and on paper they look the same and there is no real way of proving that you are the one the worked harder...
I've not read the other pages before so I don't know if someone has pointed this out, but there are things called interviews.
0
Hobo-Joe
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#39
Report 1 year ago
#39
(Original post by Science99999)
Coursework is irrelvant and a flaw to the education system, hence why it was largely removed from the majority of respectable subjects. Teachers cheat, not the student. Teachers give all the answers, the system is easily corruptable and broken. Paying others to do the coursework is equivalent to doing it in a school, where teachers install the answers into your work and practically compelte the work for you.
*gasp* are.... are you really saying that teachers are.... teaching their students! How dare they
2
gonper
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#40
Report 1 year ago
#40
You go to university to get more knowledge and experience about a specific subject. If you're gonna pay someone to do work for you, you're not going to learn anything, therefore you will finish uni with an okay degree and that is all you will have. A piece of paper. No knowledge nor experience which will make getting a job in this field a lot harder.
1
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Warwick
    Warwick Business School Postgraduate
    Thu, 20 Feb '20
  • St George's, University of London
    Postgrad open day Postgraduate
    Thu, 20 Feb '20
  • University of Hertfordshire
    All Subjects Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Feb '20

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (229)
67.75%
No (109)
32.25%

Watched Threads

View All