username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
Hi,
I have missed a LOT of my A level HISTORY lessons due to medical reasons and I was wondering what the best way to revise for A level HISTORY was...
I do British history and American History IN year 12

Thanks
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by Ariel2611)
Hi,
I have missed a LOT of my A level HISTORY lessons due to medical reasons and I was wondering what the best way to revise for A level HISTORY was...
I do British history and American History IN year 12

Thanks
Are you currently in year 12?

Are you sitting the AS this year?
0
reply
alicelmoro2
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
I read through the textbook and write down brief notes, and then repeatedly test myself on quizlet
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#4
(Original post by 04MR17)
Are you currently in year 12?

Are you sitting the AS this year?
Yeah
No, I'm only doing A level at the end of the two years ....
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by alicelmoro2)
I read through the textbook and write down brief notes, and then repeatedly test myself on quizlet
There is just so much in the textbook & because I've missed so much I don't know HOW to make notes using the huge textbook we have...
Whenever I try to make notes I find that I just read and copy everything over ...
:-(
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#6
Bump
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#7
Report 2 years ago
#7
(Original post by Ariel2611)
Yeah
No, I'm only doing A level at the end of the two years ....
In which case, I will start by saying you're 12 months away from sitting these exams, please do not panic.

Which exam board are you on and which topics specifically will you be sitting papers on?

Your priority now should be getting coursework boxed off by the way if you have that coming up.
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#8
(Original post by 04MR17)
In which case, I will start by saying you're 12 months away from sitting these exams, please do not panic.

Which exam board are you on and which topics specifically will you be sitting papers on?

Your priority now should be getting coursework boxed off by the way if you have that coming up.
Thanks for your reply
It's Edexcel
Coursework will be done later teachers said
I want to focus on getting the content into my head.... I want to be able to understand and know the content instead of getting too stressed later on :-(
0
reply
Ray_Shadows
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 years ago
#9
what period in british history , i might be able to help
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 years ago
#10
(Original post by Ariel2611)
Thanks for your reply
It's Edexcel
Coursework will be done later teachers said
I want to focus on getting the content into my head.... I want to be able to understand and know the content instead of getting too stressed later on :-(
Coursework may be done later, but you're not in the same position as everyone else. So my advice would be to work ahead on the coursework, so that when you're doing it as a class you can get it out of the way easily.

Which topics are you studying?
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#11
(Original post by Ray_Shadows)
what period in british history , i might be able to help
Britain- 1950-60's I think - I need all the help I can get with British history as I don't know anything:-(

America: up until Reagan's presidency ends

Thanks
0
reply
Ray_Shadows
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 years ago
#12
(Original post by Ariel2611)
Britain- 1950-60's I think - I need all the help I can get with British history as I don't know anything:-(

America: up until Reagan's presidency ends

Thanks
ok i don't do american history

but my british history does cover 150-1960,wherebouts have you got up to
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#13
(Original post by 04MR17)
Coursework may be done later, but you're not in the same position as everyone else. So my advice would be to work ahead on the coursework, so that when you're doing it as a class you can get it out of the way easily.

Which topics are you studying?
We are doing British History and American History this year
Coursework and witchcraft and something else next year. Believe me I really do want to start coursework too but my teacher continues to say no and to wait until next year....
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#14
(Original post by Ray_Shadows)
ok i don't do american history

but my british history does cover 150-1960,wherebouts have you got up to
I don't understand anything!
Not one thing except maybe the first few topics at the start because my teacher honestly can't teach:-(
HOW do you revise for History?
I find that I just copy the textbook into my own notes sadly!
0
reply
Ray_Shadows
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 2 years ago
#15
(Original post by Ariel2611)
I don't understand anything!
Not one thing except maybe the first few topics at the start because my teacher honestly can't teach:-(
HOW do you revise for History?
I find that I just copy the textbook into my own notes sadly!
can you not find some practice essay questions and bring them into school so teachers can mark it
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#16
Report 2 years ago
#16
(Original post by Ariel2611)
We are doing British History and American History this year
Coursework and witchcraft and something else next year. Believe me I really do want to start coursework too but my teacher continues to say no and to wait until next year....
You don't need your teacher's help to start.:nah:

I did ask for specific topics, help me out here, should be one from each list....


  • The USA, c1920–55: boom, bust and recovery
  • The USA, 1955–92: conformity and challenge
  • Anglo-Saxon England and the Anglo-Norman Kingdom, c1053–1106
  • England and the Angevin Empire in the reign of Henry II, 1154–89
  • The crusades, c1095–1204
  • England, 1509–1603: authority, nation and religion
  • Britain, 1625–1701: conflict, revolution and settlement
  • Britain, c1785–c1870: democracy, protest and reform
  • In search of the American Dream: the USA, c1917–96
  • Britain transformed, 1918–97
0
reply
CoffeeAndPolitics
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 years ago
#17
(Original post by Ariel2611)
Hi,
I have missed a LOT of my A level HISTORY lessons due to medical reasons and I was wondering what the best way to revise for A level HISTORY was...
I do British history and American History IN year 12

Thanks
1) Read the relevant pages in the textbook(s)
2) Make very concise notes on the relevant pages, something you'll be able to use for revision.
3) Turn these notes into flashcard questions, mindmaps or anything that helps you to learn it.
4) Do practice questions - can be knowledge tests or practice source-based/essay-based questions.

I'm sure you'll be fine and if you're struggling just liaise with your teacher.
0
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 years ago
#18
(Original post by Ariel2611)
There is just so much in the textbook & because I've missed so much I don't know HOW to make notes using the huge textbook we have...
Whenever I try to make notes I find that I just read and copy everything over ...
:-(
The textbooks for these new A Levels are often rubbish because they were half written then they adapted what the reforms would look like, don't fixate yourself to the one revision source.:nah:
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#19
(Original post by Ray_Shadows)
ok i don't do american history

but my british history does cover 150-1960,wherebouts have you got up to
We are doing Britain transformed (1918-97)
I don't really know anything from the beginning below:

Specification:

1 A changing political and economic environment, 1918–79
● A changing political landscape: changing party fortunes,
1918–31; the National government, 1931–45; Labour
government, the rise of consensus politics and political
challenge, 1945–79.
● Economic challenges in 1918 and post-war boom, crisis and
recovery, 1918–39; creating a managed economy, 1939–
51; the response to economic challenges, 1951–79.
● Change and challenge in the workplace: the reasons for,
and consequences of, industrial change and changing
industrial relations, 1918–39; changing working
opportunities and conditions, 1939–79; industrial relations,
1939–1979, and the reason for their breakdown in the
1960s and 70s.

Creating a welfare state, 1918–79
● Providing social welfare: the extent, and nature of, social
welfare provision, 1918–39; the impact of the Second World
War, the Labour government and consensus, 1939–64; the
reasons for increasing challenges to state welfare provision,
1964–79.
● Public health: health provision, 1918–45; the creation and
impact of the National Health Service (NHS), 1945–79, and
the challenge of medical advances.
● Education and widening opportunities: education policy,
1918–43; the significance of the ‘Butler Act’ 1944, and the
development of comprehensive education to 1979; the
growth and social impact of university education, 1918–79.

Society in transition, 1918–79
● Class and social values: class, social change and the impact
of wars, 1918–51; the emergence of the ‘liberal society’,
and its opponents, 1951–79.
● The changing role and status of women: the right to vote
and political advancement, 1918–79; changes in family life
and the quest for personal freedoms, 1918–79.
● Race and immigration: immigration policies and attitudes
towards ethnic minorities, 1918–39; the impact of the
Second World War and new Commonwealth immigration;
racial controversy and the impact of government policies on
race relations and immigration, 1958–79.

The changing quality of life, 1918–79
● Changing living standards: the impact of boom, crisis and
recovery, and the significance of regional differences,
1918–39; the effects of ‘total war’ and austerity, 1939–51;
the growth of a consumer society, 1951–79.
● Popular culture and entertainment: the impact of mass
popular culture, including cinema, radio and music,
1918–79; the influence of television from the 1950s and
youth culture, 1955–79.
● Leisure and travel: the growth of spectator sports from the
1920s; increased leisure time and the development of mass
tourism from the 1930s; the impact of car ownership and
travel developments, 1918–79.

Historical interpretationsContent:
What impact did Thatcher’s governments (1979–90)have on Britain, 1979–97?
● The effect of Thatcher’s economic policies.
● The extent to which state intervention and the public sector
were ‘rolled-back’.
● The extent of political and social division within Britain.
● The effect of Thatcherism on politics and party


AMERICAN HISTORY:

1 Boom and crash, 1920–29
● The economic boom of the 1920s: mass production;
technological advances and their impact on leisure; the
automobile; hire purchase; laissez faire; farmers, black
Americans and limits to the boom.
● Causes of the crash of 1929: the Wall Street Crash;
overproduction; land speculation; the bull market;
weaknesses of the banking system.
● Changes in society; immigration and the ‘Red Scare’; the
Ku Klux Klan; prohibition and organised crime; the changing
role of women.
● Cultural change in the 1920s: the Jazz Age; the Harlem
Renaissance; growing popularity of baseball; radio and the
cinema; American literature.

2 Depression and New Deal, 1929–38
● The spread of the depression, 1929–32: growth of
unemployment; collapse of GDP; effects on workers,
families, farmers and ethnic minorities; ‘gangsterism’.
● Hoover’s response to the depression, 1929–33: the Smoot-
Hawley Tariff; homelessness and the Hoovervilles; the
Reconstruction Finance Corporation; Emergency Relief and
Construction Act 1932.
● Roosevelt and the First New Deal, 1933–35: emergency
relief; public works; the alphabet agencies; help for
farmers; reforming the financial system; opposition to
Roosevelt’s policies, including Huey Long and the Supreme
Court.
● The Second New Deal, 1935–38: the Wagner Act (1935)
and industrial relations; the Social Security Act 1935; the
Revenue Act 1935; opposition to the Second New Deal.

3 Impact of the New Deal and the Second World War on the USA to 1945
● The New Deal and the economy: the impact of New Deal
policies on unemployment and national infrastructure;
women and the New Deal, including the role of Eleanor
Roosevelt; the state of the US economy in 1940.
● The impact of the New Deal and the war on ethnic
minorities: New Deal policies and black Americans; the
Indian Reorganisation Act 1934; change for hispanic
Americans; the contribution of ethnic minorities to the war
effort; the race riots of 1943; the Double V campaign.
● Social and cultural changes: WPA support for writers and
musicians; changes in the role of women, including impact
of the Fair Employment Practices Commission on the status
of women and black Americans; wartime domestic
propaganda; the power of Hollywood, including war films
and the rise of Disney; the growing power of radio; popular
music.
● The war and the economy, 1941–45: the collapse of
unemployment; women and the war effort; the contribution
of young people; growing power of trade unions; migration
to urban and industrial centres; the growth of new
industries.

4 The transformation of the USA, 1945–55
● Economic transformation: changing employment
opportunities; government policies to encourage growth;
the provision of mortgages for veterans; growing mobility,
including cars and highway construction. The growth of the
suburbs; Levittown projects; the new consumer society.
● The end of post-war euphoria: HUAC, McCarthyism and
their impact; anti-communism and the Cold War context;
the reality of the nuclear age, including Ethel and Julius
Rosenberg.
● Cultural change: Hollywood and the Cold War; the growing
power of television, including popular entertainment and
sitcoms, the stereotyping of women and ethnic minorities;
the origins of a teenage culture, including rock’n’roll.
● The changing status of minorities: Truman’s desegregation
of the armed forces; extent of integration in professional
sports and popular entertainment; the growth of the
NAACP; the Brown case 1954; the extent of change by
1955.

Doing these topics in history (America) now/class has done:

1 Affluence and conformity, 1955–63
● Urbanisation and affluence: the changing nature of cities;
expansion of the suburbs; highway development; growing
ownership and use of cars; white collar jobs and service
industries; consumerism and domestic technology.
● Cultural conformity and challenge: suburban conformity and
social change in film and TV; advertising; the challenge of
teenage culture and music; ‘beatnik’ culture.
● The civil rights movement, including the Montgomery and
Birmingham protests; the impact of the Washington march;
the Ku Klux Klan and White Citizens’ Committees.
● Kennedy’s New Frontier: social welfare and unemployment
programmes; environmentalism and expansion of the
National Park system; the Peace Corps; the space
programme; extent of Kennedy’s domestic achievements


2 Protest and reaction, 1963–72
● Civil rights: the significance of Malcolm X, Black Power and
the Black Panthers; King’s changing priorities, including the
campaigns in Selma and Chicago; King’s achievements and
the impact of his assassination; the work of Cesar Chavez.
● Protest and personal freedom: student protest; counter-
culture and its key features; the growth of the women’s
movement; the impact of sexual liberalisation; the origins of
gay rights.
● Johnson’s Great Society, 1964–68: tackling poverty and
unemployment; improving housing and education; Medicare
and Medicaid; civil rights laws; Johnson’s achievements.
● Reactions to the counter-culture, 1968–72: the rise of the
‘silent majority’; the role of the media in influencing
attitudes; the impact of events in Vietnam and at Kent
State; Nixon’s appeal and his attack on the Great Society.

3 Social and political change, 1973–80
● The crisis of political leadership: the impact of Watergate on
politics and the presidency; Ford, Carter and a new style of
leadership; growing political disillusion, including the impact
of the Iranian hostage crisis; the political impact of
environmentalism.
● The impact of economic change on society: the effects of
inflation on family incomes; the growth of homelessness;
the oil crisis and the end of cheap energy; the impact of
foreign competition; the response of the government.
● Changing popular culture: business interests in sports; the
fragmentation of popular music; contradictions in film and
TV, including the depiction of political and social tensions
and a return to escapism; developments in news media.
● The extent of progress in individual and civil rights: the
political and social impact of Roe v. Wade; women’s rights;
workers’ rights; gay rights; Native American rights and the
impact of Red Power; the status of black Americans.

On this now:

4 Republican dominance and its opponents, 1981–92
● New directions in economic policy: the impact of Reagan’s
policies on workers and the family; the trade and budget
deficit; the significance of Bush’s decision to raise taxes.
● The Religious Right and its critics: the promotion of
traditional values; campaigns against abortion and
homosexuality; Nancy Reagan’s ‘Just Say No’ campaign; the
growth of bitter political divisions and their significance.
● Cultural challenge: trends in youth culture; the impact of
technology on popular culture; the growth of cable
television and the influence of MTV; the impact of the AIDS
crisis; controversial social issues in film and television.
● Social change: the changing status of ethnic minorities; the
impact of black American success in politics, business, sport
and popular culture; the extent of racial tolerance and
integration by 1992; the impact of women in politics and
the workplace; the changing status of women by 1992.

Thanks & sorry
0
reply
username3506416
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#20
(Original post by Ray_Shadows)
can you not find some practice essay questions and bring them into school so teachers can mark it
Yes I could but what's the point when I don't know the content :-(
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

If you do not get the A-level grades you want this summer, what is your likely next step?

Take autumn exams (251)
47%
Take exams next summer (72)
13.48%
Change uni choice through clearing (115)
21.54%
Apply to uni next year instead (55)
10.3%
I'm not applying to university (41)
7.68%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed