Does Money Bring Happiness?

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العبقري
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#1
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#1
Writing a debate against the statement 'money brings happiness' any ideas?
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04MR17
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#2
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https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5222872
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04MR17
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#3
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(Original post by العبقري)
Seen this one... not too helpful.
Depends how you're using it. Use the ideas brought forward as a spring-board into your own opinion.
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username3832246
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#4
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Only until you earn 40-50k.
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العبقري
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#5
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I've read several articles by the BBC and other major newspapers and they suggest money brings temporary satisfaction, happiness may come from that but 'money doesn't grow on trees!' I've read the recommended thread yet most people are making comments like 'it buys whiskey!'

I came on TSR for the first time today to ask for advice not 'free help' as said by .

If you have any ideas do share
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fallen_acorns
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#6
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yes to a point

Enough money to meet your basic personal needs and expectations, will have an impact on your happiness.

Those needs are self-identified though, and not universal. They often come from your early childhoods perspective of what makes up a good life. They normally either match your parents wealth (if you were satisfied back then) or match the perceived wealth of other families around you (if you were not satisfied)

Above that level brings no more happiness. It may give a temporary boost for a while, but it won't change your long term happiness. (there are great studies about lottery winners which give good evidence to this)

So for example. A lower-middle class person from the UK may have their level of basic perceived needs at around £25k. Less then that will effect their happiness.. reach that and they have what they need.. more then that, and it won't effect their happiness.

An upper class person's basic perceived needs may be 200k per year. If you give them £50. they will be deeply unhappy and quickly get depressed and feel trapped. Give them 1 million, and they wont be happier then if they had 200k though.

Here in China where I live many families would be delighted with £6k a year, less then that would effect them. more would not. etc.

Its all about your perceived base requirements. the minimum you think that you need to live a 'comfortable' life on.

---

I would say that makes it a hard debate, if you are forced into a binary yes/no answer.. because neither side will be able to fully convince the other.

The 'yes it makes you happier' - will skew heavily towards focusing on peoples needs under my 'base level of happiness', looking at poverty/homelessness etc. and they will be right.

The 'no it does not make you happier' - will skew towards evidence that sudden increases in wealth do not bring long-term happiness, and over your basic needs, happiness is not more prevalent in the richer classes then the middle classes.
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paul514
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#7
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(Original post by العبقري)
Writing a debate against the statement 'money brings happiness' any ideas?
It’s as simple as this.

Money buys you more choices and if you select the right choices for yourself you can be content. Happiness is a short term emotion.
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TSR_Is_A_Joke
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#8
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#8
This is subjective. Depends entirely on the person in question.
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username738914
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#9
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(Original post by العبقري)
Writing a debate against the statement 'money brings happiness' any ideas?
Money is just a tool. Once your basic needs are met and once you have a modicum of disposable income that far outpaces what you'd require to satisfy any basic "wants", any incremental amount has diminishing returns.

Aka, once you can pay all your bills, not sweat the price of everyday things, can take holidays/go on dates/pursue hobbies and buy the odd luxury/high quality thing every now and then anything else basically just goes to savings. Which, once you've become financially independent - where 3-4% of withdrawal on your savings can cover your expenses, the extra money is just to keep score.

So yes, money can lead to a strong foundation whereby you can then pursue happiness but it doesn't lead to happiness in and of itself. That, is more about how content you are in life and the strength of your relationships.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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DJKL
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#10
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#10
Anyone who has had to sit through endless meetings with lawyers, accountants and financial advisers discussing preserving the wealth they have accumulated, might sometimes question if it is really worth having or is wealth, at times, a burden placing excess demands on their sanity.

There is a sweet spot, different for every individual, whilst i might wish each of my children to say inherit £1 million i am really not sure if I would say the same if it were £10 million and I can certainly say I would probably not wish them to be burdened with £100 million.
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username3079870
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#11
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(Original post by العبقري)
Writing a debate against the statement 'money brings happiness' any ideas?
It's not a "Yes/no" answer.

What I would say, as others have alluded to is that the correlation between money and happiness doesn't exist beyond a certain point, as demonstrated by the graph here:

https://www.inc.com/quora/money-wont...-accordin.html

Basically, once people have a certain amount of money to be comfortable, to not have to worry about unpayable debt or starving from lack of money etc... more money beyond that point doesn't' make them any happier.
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rudic990
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#12
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#12
Money reduces stress, its hard to be happy with stress in your life!
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paul514
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#13
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(Original post by rudic990)
Money reduces stress, its hard to be happy with stress in your life!
No it doesn’t
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lizolove
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(Original post by العبقري)
Writing a debate against the statement 'money brings happiness' any ideas?
I think the question focuses around the stresses that life involves in light of not having money - struggling to pay bills, rent, bringing up children, working in stressful jobs trying to get promotions - and how this can affect your mood and ultimately your relationships.

When you think about what makes people happy, it'll differ per person, although the majority will probably say it involves spending time with loved ones and being able to do/buy what they want (e.g. go on holiday). If you have money, often, you can afford to work less, and do these sort of things more, and arguably, that should make you more happy.

BUT, if you look at it from an isolated perspective (does money make you happy) in a strict sense (money = happiness) - you could argue otherwise. If you don't have the pre-requisite things that people say make them happy (e.g. family, friends) then is it possible to buy happiness? You would probably argue not because material items will occupy us for a time, but only to a certain point, and then they will cease to make us happy, and greed may set in to make us want more (greater and better) things.

If you're well off and you don't have friends/family, you may find people form relationships with you simply because you have money, and the relationships aren't genuine and/or don't offer anything to you (i.e. somebody who cares/will help you) but merely is a face to access your wealth.
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rudic990
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#15
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#15
(Original post by paul514)
No it doesn’t
Intrigued why you think it doesn't...
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Xopher_
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#16
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#16
Depends how much you earn. I'm working minimum wage and all of my friends don't have jobs, therefore I'm rich to them. However if I compare myself to my work colleagues, I'm poor as hell.
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Rabbit2
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#17
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(Original post by العبقري)
Writing a debate against the statement 'money brings happiness' any ideas?
Ok, something like 57% of marriages in the west end in divorce According to surveys, something like 37% of the remaining 43% of marriages have at least one partner who "would leave the marriage if they could". Usually, the reason they cannot, is finances. This partner is often the female, but sometimes the male. In western society, the woman usually ends up with the kids (particularly if they are small). The woman has to cope with earning a living for herself and her kids, with little if any help from the father. Women tend to go through school, with the mindset : "Oh, i'm going to get married, have kids, and be a housewife. That is a fine ambition, but may not work long term. Reportedly, over 87% of really serious arguments between married couples are over finances. Often the arguments involve not only allocating resources, but also the inability of at least one of the partners to manage money People in western society are generally NOT taught how to manage money. Witness the millions of people who are heavily in debt. Debt that they cannot pay off. I don't agree that money always brings happiness, but it certainly helps out should someone lose their job, or some other calamity ensue. Also, you cannot buy enough insurance to support a non-working spouse, with children, for the rest of her life. You do not have enough money to pay the premiums on that size of a policy. A woman with two small children, who does not work, will need about $8,000 a month (at a minimum) for a minimalist living standard, for at least 40 years, to take her to retirement. Figure the premiums you would have to pay to buy that sized policy. It's unworkable. A woman who can pull in $60,000 to $70,000 a year, is in a lot better position than one working as a waitress. The South Dakota School of Mines, [www.sdsmt.edu] reports that the average starting salary earned by their electrical engineering graduates last year was $64,600 that is £45,200.62 GBP in 'real' money. Most waitresses don't make half that here. Cheers.
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nathanclith1
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#18
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#18
Money definately doesnt bring happiness, I'm broke and the happiest person I know - just do the things you love while you're young, money can wait
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paul514
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#19
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#19
(Original post by rudic990)
Intrigued why you think it doesn't...
Because it simply doesn’t, stress is an internal factor, what stresses one person doesn’t stress another.

My previous post on this thread is the only answer to the OP.

Money buys choices and if you pick the right choices you can be content.

Happiness is a short term emotion.
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Unknown-99
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#20
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#20
Depends on the person. I think money can buy temporary happiness for example buying an expensive car will make you happy at first but the fun will soon wear off. The way I look at it is I think about what I want most in life, the thing that will make me happy no matter what, and then I think about whether it can be bought. In my case the thing I want most in life can not be bought so for me money does not buy happiness.
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