Thoth's World
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Hey, simple question most likely. Why must enthalpy change use the formula q= MC DELTA T. Why can't Temperature directly measure the enthalpy change?

Temperature is a measure of energy. This value can be converted into q- in my mind. Can someone correct me?
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akash3141
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(Original post by Thoth's World)
Hey, simple question most likely. Why must enthalpy change use the formula q= MC DELTA T. Why can't Temperature directly measure the enthalpy change?

Temperature is a measure of energy. This value can be converted into q- in my mind. Can someone correct me?
The energy change is dependent on the mass of the water, or the solution too. The same temperature change for different masses of solution will give different energy outputs.
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NonIndigenous
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Temperature = Energy

Change in temperature = Change in energy

Delta is just another word, or symbol, for "change". DELTA T = (T1 - T2)

You cannot therefore have:
Temperature = Change in Energy

It is illogical.
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Thoth's World
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(Original post by akash3141)
The energy change is dependent on the mass of the water, or the solution too. The same temperature change for different masses of solution will give different energy outputs.
'The same temperature change for different masses of solution will give different energy outputs'. Shouldn't the temperature change be proportional to the energy output, if temperature is the embodiment of energy?
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Thoth's World
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(Original post by NonIndigenous)
Temperature = Energy

Change in temperature = Change in energy

Delta is just another word, or symbol, for "change". DELTA T = (T1 - T2)

You cannot therefore have:
Temperature = Change in Energy

It is illogical.
What? 'Change in temperature = change in energy' 'You cannot therefore have: Temperature = change in energy'
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NonIndigenous
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(Original post by Thoth's World)
What? 'Change in temperature = change in energy' 'You cannot therefore have: Temperature = change in energy'
I'm not sure how else to explain it.

If you have an initial temperature of 10 degrees, which increases to a final temperature 30 degrees... the temperature change is 20 degrees.

So it only makes sense that when calculating the energy change, you do it for 20 degrees. Not 30 degrees, or 10 degrees.

If you want to calculate the initial energy, you do it for 10 degrees, in my example.
If you want to calculate the final energy, you do it for 30 degrees.
If you want to calculate the energy change (between final and initial), you do it for: 30 - 10 = 20 degrees.

Sorry, I can't do better than that.
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