debbie394
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when it says 'ATP is the standard intermediary energy-releasing and energy-consuming metabolic reactions in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells'

what does that mean

isn't energy-releasing to do with respiration and energy-consumption to do with the biological processes atp drives
so don't both metabolic reactions use atp ?
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Daveboi115
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An intermediary is simply a “go between” like a bridge for example. All that phrase means is that ATP is a common link between energy release and consumption. To put it into context, ATP produced in the cell through the relevant metabolic processes and it will then go on to be used as the energy giving rise to other products of metabolic processes.
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debbie394
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(Original post by Daveboi115)
An intermediary is simply a “go between” like a bridge for example. All that phrase means is that ATP is a common link between energy release and consumption. To put it into context, ATP produced in the cell through the relevant metabolic processes and it will then go on to be used as the energy giving rise to other products of metabolic processes.
the energy consumed from organic substrates to produce tap, what type of energy is that?
is that a different type of energy?
what type of energy is atp?
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S.G.
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(Original post by esmeralda123)
the energy consumed from organic substrates to produce tap, what type of energy is that?
is that a different type of energy?
what type of energy is atp?
ATP is produced from reactions.

ATP is hydrolysed to release energy. Remember bond breaking releases energy?
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Daveboi115
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I’m going to pitch this one around AS-level standard given that I have no reference.

ATP will give rise to three major energy outputs, dependant in which reactions occur. ATP itself is not an energy, it is a molecule which provides energy through hydrolysis of the attached phosphate groups. ATP to ADP and to a lesser extent ADP to AMP. Energies involved include heat, work and chemical energies. As stated this is dependant upon the reaction taking place.
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debbie394
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1) i know this sounds stupid, but if atp is produced because of respiration, how can molecules of atp be released in respiration. is it because more atp is made than released

i can't get my head around it

2) also for gylcolysis, why are 4 molecules of atp made when there are only 2 phopshate groups in total for the two triose phosphates, so two phosphate groups can produce 2 atp
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Daveboi115
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(Original post by esmeralda123)
i know this sounds stupid, but if atp is produced because of respiration, how can molecules of atp be released and made in respiration

i can't get my head around it
Could you clarify the issue? Are you confused about how ATP is both produced and utilised in metabolic processes?
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debbie394
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(Original post by Daveboi115)
Could you clarify the issue? Are you confused about how ATP is both produced and utilised in metabolic processes?
actually don't worry i am getting confused with repsiratory susbrates. i understand now

do you know the answer to my second question ?
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Daveboi115
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(Original post by esmeralda123)
1) i know this sounds stupid, but if atp is produced because of respiration, how can molecules of atp be released in respiration. is it because more atp is made than released

i can't get my head around it

2) also for gylcolysis, why are 4 molecules of atp made when there are only 2 phopshate groups in total for the two triose phosphates, so two phosphate groups can produce 2 atp
Ok so for glycolysis, to understand it properly you have to look at the full cycle before breaking it down. It involves the degradation of one six carbon sugar into two 3 carbon sugars. The triose phosphates. Each molecule of glucose goes through the process twice and gives out 2ATP each time. So that’s 4 in total. Although you do have to account for the 2ATP input at the beginning of the cycle so your net gain is only 2ATP.
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debbie394
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(Original post by Daveboi115)
Ok so for glycolysis, to understand it properly you have to look at the full cycle before breaking it down. It involves the degradation of one six carbon sugar into two 3 carbon sugars. The triose phosphates. Each molecule of glucose goes through the process twice and gives out 2ATP each time. So that’s 4 in total. Although you do have to account for the 2ATP input at the beginning of the cycle so your net gain is only 2ATP.
i don't get what you mean by 'each molecule of glucose goes through the process twice' ?
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Daveboi115
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(Original post by esmeralda123)
i don't get what you mean by 'each molecule of glucose goes through the process twice' ?
So the molecule of glucose itself as a whole gets broken down into 2 separate three carbon sugars. Each of these sugars then go through the final stages of glycolysis once. But there are two molecules, both derived from the original 6 carbon sugar. One ATP is produced from conversion of 1,3-Bisphosphoglycerate to 3-Phosphoglycerate and another in the conversion of PEP to Pyruvate. Each 3 carbon sugar goes through this process individually.
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RickHendricks
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(Original post by esmeralda123)
when it says 'ATP is the standard intermediary energy-releasing and energy-consuming metabolic reactions in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells'

what does that mean

isn't energy-releasing to do with respiration and energy-consumption to do with the biological processes atp drives
so don't both metabolic reactions use atp ?
ATP releases energy by having one its phosphate groups broken, and there is energy loss during that, which accounts for the energy that ATP is providing.

ATP turns into ADP at that time and in the mitochondria, ADP turns into ATP by hydrolysis (by using hydrolase I believe), and this process requires energy.
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debbie394
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(Original post by RickHendricks)
ATP releases energy by having one its phosphate groups broken, and there is energy loss during that, which accounts for the energy that ATP is providing.

ATP turns into ADP at that time and in the mitochondria, ADP turns into ATP by hydrolysis (by using hydrolase I believe), and this process requires energy.
i thought that adp turns into atp by condensation
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RickHendricks
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(Original post by esmeralda123)
i thought that adp turns into atp by condensation
Much apologies.

Yes ADP turns into ATP, by a phosphate group "rebonding" with the ADP molecule to make ATP, and it is a condensation reaction, and this is where ENERGY is USED, and the reaction is catalysed by ATP synthase.

The reverse occurs in conditions such as active transport using channels across cell membranes, and in this process, ATP turns into ADP, and in the process the energy stored in the bond is released to provide for the movement against concentration gradient. This reaction is hydrolysis and it is catalysed by ATP hydrolase.
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