This discussion is closed.
I-ZAAA
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
This question is about fluorine, I can't get my head around it. I searched in textbooks and internet still no answer, BTW I am in Year 11 and I will be sitting the GCSE Combined Science Paper (Higher Tier)

Calcium reacts with fluorine to produce calcium fluoride (CaF2).
Explain how oxidation and reduction have taken place in this reaction.
Write about electron transfer in your answer.
4 marks
2
euphrosynay
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
calcium + flourine → calcium flouride
Ca + F_2 → CaF_2

this is an example of an ionic bond forming. here, the calcium atom loses 2 electrons, and the two flourine atoms each gain 1 electron.

the reaction equations above can be written as 2 separate 'half-equations':

Ca → Ca^2+ + 2e^-
calcium atom → calcium ion + 2 electrons

calcium's ion is positive, meaning that there are more protons than electrons. this happens when a calcium atom loses electrons.
since the calcium has 2 electrons separated from it, it loses electrons. oxidation is the loss of electrons.


F_2 + 2e^- → 2F^-
a diatomic flourine molecule + 2 electrons → 2 flourine ions

flourine's ion is negative, meaning that there are more electrons than protons. this happens when a flourine atom gains an electron.
since the flourine has 2 electrons added to it, it gains electrons. reduction is the gain of electrons.

therefore, calcium is oxidised and flourine is reduced.
5
I-ZAAA
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#3
(Original post by euphrosynay)
calcium + flourine → calcium flouride
Ca + F_2 → CaF_2

this is an example of an ionic bond forming. here, the calcium atom loses 2 electrons, and the two flourine atoms each gain 1 electron.

the reaction equations above can be written as 2 separate 'half-equations':

Ca → Ca^2+ + 2e^-
calcium atom → calcium ion + 2 electrons

calcium's ion is positive, meaning that there are more protons than electrons. this happens when a calcium atom loses electrons.
since the calcium has 2 electrons separated from it, it loses electrons. oxidation is the loss of electrons.


F_2 + 2e^- → 2F^-
a diatomic flourine molecule + 2 electrons → 2 flourine ions

flourine's ion is negative, meaning that there are more electrons than protons. this happens when a flourine atom gains an electron.
since the flourine has 2 electrons added to it, it gains electrons. reduction is the gain of electrons.

therefore, calcium is oxidised and flourine is reduced.
Thank You Very Much!
I was just confused if the fluorine were ions or atoms (stupid).
Thank you !!
1
euphrosynay
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 years ago
#4
no problem! glad to clear up the issue
0
Gold bxtch
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report 2 years ago
#5
(Original post by euphrosynay)
no problem! glad to clear up the issue
this helped me soo much time
0
Estoy_Confusión
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 months ago
#6
(Original post by euphrosynay)
calcium + flourine → calcium flouride
Ca + F_2 → CaF_2

this is an example of an ionic bond forming. here, the calcium atom loses 2 electrons, and the two flourine atoms each gain 1 electron.

the reaction equations above can be written as 2 separate 'half-equations':

Ca → Ca^2+ + 2e^-
calcium atom → calcium ion + 2 electrons

calcium's ion is positive, meaning that there are more protons than electrons. this happens when a calcium atom loses electrons.
since the calcium has 2 electrons separated from it, it loses electrons. oxidation is the loss of electrons.


F_2 + 2e^- → 2F^-
a diatomic flourine molecule + 2 electrons → 2 flourine ions

flourine's ion is negative, meaning that there are more electrons than protons. this happens when a flourine atom gains an electron.
since the flourine has 2 electrons added to it, it gains electrons. reduction is the gain of electrons.

therefore, calcium is oxidised and flourine is reduced.
Omg thank you so much, this was on my hw and I think I got the wording mixed up or something!
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (50)
30.12%
No - I have already returned home (23)
13.86%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (37)
22.29%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (15)
9.04%
No - I live at home during term anyway (41)
24.7%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed