BREAKING: US Plane engine explodes as it was like in free-fall

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Tawheed
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-43803340

A US passenger jet has made an emergency landing in Philadelphia after part of the covering on its left engine got ripped off.
A window and part of the fuselage were also damaged, officials say.
The Southwest Airlines plane was flying from New York's La Guardia airport to Dallas, Texas, with 143 passengers and five crew aboard.
The Boeing Co 737-700 made a safe landing but at least one person is said to have been injured.

The US Federal Aviation Administration has opened an investigation.
The father of one passenger aboard the plane told NBC Philadelphia that a woman was "partially sucked out" of a window after it was pierced by debris from the engine.

The woman was pulled back inside the fuselage by other passengers, Todd Bauer added.

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laurawatt
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oh damn.... that's not good :no:
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Tawheed
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(Original post by laurawatt)
oh damn.... that's not good :no:
Some of these pictures frighten me, particularly given i have a phobia of flying.
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Joep95
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That picture is of the wrong plane a 737 has 2 engines one on each wing, the picture in the op is of air france’s A380 which had a problem and landed in Canada a few months ago
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shawn_o1
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Pic is definitely not a 737...
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uberteknik
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Boeing 737-700 Southwest Airlines flight SWA1380.

Seems like the port engine forward nacelle disintegrated and damaged the fuselage. A piece punctured the cabin next to window aisle of row 14A and a woman passenger sustained serious head injuries. I believe she has since died unfortunately.

This happened at 32,500' when the aircraft was still climbing to 38,000'. The emergency oxygen masks dropped and the pilots made a controlled descent at 3000' per minute to 10,000'. i.e. 8 minutes or so descent. This is not 'free falling like a stone' as some have reported.

FYI, twin-engine passenger aircraft are designed to fly on one engine in emergencies.

Air transport remains one of the safest modes of transport.

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uberteknik
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On a side note and from the same flight during the incident, how NOT to wear oxygen masks:

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Tawheed
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(Original post by uberteknik)
On a side note and from the same flight during the incident, how NOT to wear oxygen masks:

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I have a flight in 13 days
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uberteknik
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(Original post by Tawheed)
I have a flight in 13 days
You will be absolutely fine.

Try not to fret. Seriously, you are far, far, safer on a passenger 'plane than crossing the street, using a bus, driving in a car or a train or even getting in and out of the shower or bath.

I wish you a safe trip and to return home safely.
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Tawheed
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(Original post by uberteknik)
You will be absolutely fine.

Try not to fret. Seriously, you are far, far, safer on a passenger 'plane than crossing the street, using a bus, driving in a car or a train or even getting in and out of the shower or bath.

I wish you a safe trip and to return home safely.
This is reassuring! I believe you were also extremely helpful the last time we spoke. Thank you so much. Its with British Airways through, who have had their fair share of engine problems.
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uberteknik
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(Original post by Tawheed)
This is reassuring! I believe you were also extremely helpful the last time we spoke. Thank you so much. Its with British Airways through, who have had their fair share of engine problems.
All airlines have routine engine problems - most times passengers never know. The engines used by British Airways are computer monitored continuously at all times. Engine condition data is collected and monitored throughout it's life and transmitted to the manufacturer in flight who then perform preventative maintenance and will schedule part replacement long before it fails.

Often, a problem is detected mid-flight and the part concerned is dispatched to the maintenance engineers at the arrival airport (while still in flight) who then replace it.

Modern engines are also designed to contain catastrophic 'blow out' failures without compromising the survival of the aircraft to land at the nearest airport.

FYI, British Airways ranks 4th highest for it's safety record out of all airlines in operation. You have a much better chance of winning the national lottery jackpot than being a fatality on a BA flight. :-)
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Drewski
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(Original post by Tawheed)
I have a flight in 13 days
This 1 flight made the news.

The other 100,000+ in the world that day didn't because they were perfectly normal.

40+ million civilian flights per year in the world, only the smallest handful ever encounter any serious problems.

You'll be totally fine.
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Tawheed
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(Original post by uberteknik)
All airlines have routine engine problems - most times passengers never know. The engines used by British Airways are computer monitored continuously at all times. Engine condition data is collected and monitored throughout it's life and transmitted to the manufacturer in flight who then perform preventative maintenance and will schedule part replacement long before it fails.

Often, a problem is detected mid-flight and the part concerned is dispatched to the maintenance engineers at the arrival airport (while still in flight) who then replace it.

Modern engines are also designed to contain catastrophic 'blow out' failures without compromising the survival of the aircraft to land at the nearest airport.

FYI, British Airways ranks 4th highest for it's safety record out of all airlines in operation. You have a much better chance of winning the national lottery jackpot than being a fatality on a BA flight. :-)
God-willing, when i fly i will remember this wonderful post.
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