SharminSSS
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1. What is the difference between college degree vs university degree?
2. Does colleges have the same 4 year bachelor's undergraduate course (related to biochemistry) provided in universities in Canada?
3. Can someone do a Masters degree right after attaining a degree from a college? Or is there some other courses that need to be completed before one can do master's?
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alleycat393
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(Original post by SharminSSS)
1. What is the difference between college degree vs university degree?
2. Does colleges have the same 4 year bachelor's undergraduate course (related to biochemistry) provided in universities in Canada?
3. Can someone do a Masters degree right after attaining a degree from a college? Or is there some other courses that need to be completed before one can do master's?
The UK calls a uni a uni and the US and Canada calls it a college. The education systems are very different in terms of length of degree and what you study. Yes you can do a masters straight after.
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SharminSSS
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(Original post by alleycat393)
The UK calls a uni a uni and the US and Canada calls it a college. The education systems are very different in terms of length of degree and what you study. Yes you can do a masters straight after.
I see. But in Canada, from what i have gathered, COLLEGES mainly gives out diploma degree whereas UNIVERSITIES gives undergraduate degrees. That's where i got confused. Would you know about it?
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alleycat393
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(Original post by SharminSSS)
I see. But in Canada, from what i have gathered, COLLEGES mainly gives out diploma degree whereas UNIVERSITIES gives undergraduate degrees. That's where i got confused. Would you know about it?
You'll have to look up to clarify. I know in the States they use the term colleges very loosely. This is a UK site so not many people may know.
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zero_gravity
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(Original post by alleycat393)
The UK calls a uni a uni and the US and Canada calls it a college. The education systems are very different in terms of length of degree and what you study. Yes you can do a masters straight after.
Actually, that is incorrect. The term "college", according to your interpretation, is only applicable to the US, not Canada. Canada also calls a uni a uni. Colleges in Canada are similar to community colleges in the US. This is similar to a polytechnic in UK terms; it provides a more practical approach to your education, while university focusses more on the theoretical aspect. I will elaborate on this below.

(Original post by SharminSSS)
1. What is the difference between college degree vs university degree?
2. Does colleges have the same 4 year bachelor's undergraduate course (related to biochemistry) provided in universities in Canada?
3. Can someone do a Masters degree right after attaining a degree from a college? Or is there some other courses that need to be completed before one can do master's?
1. Colleges are different from universities. Colleges usually offer diploma or certificate programmes. Universities offer bachelor's degrees. However, the educational system is slowly changing, as Canadian colleges are starting to adopt four-year bachelor degree programmes in affiliation with some universities. Nowadays, you can receive a four-year undergraduate degree at a college. In the end, you will be awarded a bachelor's degree (as opposed to a diploma or certificate, which only takes one to two years). In this sense, it is somewhat similar to a polytechnic in the UK.

2. I don't think there are any college programmes offering biochemistry. However, there are programmes in biotechnology offered at some colleges. In Ontario, there are 4 colleges offering a bachelor's degree programme similar to biochemistry:

a) Fanshawe College - Honours Bachelor Of Applied Technology - Biotechnology
b) Georgian College - Honours Bachelor of Science in Applied Life Science Degree with Biotechnology-Health Diploma
c) Conestoga College - Bachelor of Environmental Public Health (Honours)
d) Durham College - Bachelor (Honours) Health Care Technology Management

For more information on colleges in Ontario, you can visit https://www.ontariocolleges.ca/en. For other programmes, you can search up on https://www.collegesinstitutes.ca/our-members/list-of-degrees.

3. It depends. I reckon that is possible with a bachelor's degree after completing a four-year programme, but it is definitely not possible with a diploma or certificate.

Hope that helps!
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alleycat393
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(Original post by zero_gravity)
1. Colleges are different from universities. Colleges usually offer diploma or certificate programmes. Universities offer bachelor's degrees. However, the educational system is slowly changing, as Canadian colleges are starting to adopt four-year bachelor degree programmes in affiliation with some universities. Nowadays, you can receive a four-year undergraduate degree at a college. In the end, you will be awarded a bachelor's degree (as opposed to a diploma or certificate, which only takes one to two years). In this sense, it is somewhat similar to a polytechnic in the UK.

2. I don't think there are any college programmes offering biochemistry. However, there are programmes in biotechnology offered at some colleges. In Ontario, there are 4 colleges offering a bachelor's degree programme similar to biochemistry:

a) Fanshawe College - Honours Bachelor Of Applied Technology - Biotechnology
b) Georgian College - Honours Bachelor of Science in Applied Life Science Degree with Biotechnology-Health Diploma
c) Conestoga College - Bachelor of Environmental Public Health (Honours)
d) Durham College - Bachelor (Honours) Health Care Technology Management

For more information on colleges in Ontario, you can visit https://www.ontariocolleges.ca/en. For other programmes, you can search up on https://www.collegesinstitutes.ca/our-members/list-of-degrees.

3. It depends. I reckon that is possible with a bachelor's degree after completing a four-year programme, but it is definitely not possible with a diploma or certificate.

Hope that helps!
Thanks for explaining. However the term college is also a colloquialism for uni in North America generally and polytechnics or ex-polys also have degree awarding powers here so things are not quite so clear cut as you’ve also mentioned above. Further you can go to uni here to do vocational degrees so no degrees are not just about theory.
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zero_gravity
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(Original post by alleycat393)
Thanks for explaining. However the term college is also a colloquialism for uni in North America generally and polytechnics or ex-polys also have degree awarding powers here so things are not quite so clear cut as you’ve also mentioned above. Further you can go to uni here to do vocational degrees so no degrees are not just about theory.
That is generally the case in the US, but it does not mean the same in Canada. Note that colleges also have degree-awarding powers in Canada, only to a lesser extent than universities. This has been the case in recent years.

As I mentioned before, polytechnics are the closest thing to a college in Canada, which is why I made that comparison (for a better understanding). Colleges also offer vocational degrees, but they are usually classified as diplomas and certificates. I'm merely explaining (for lack of clarity) that they have a more practical approach to education.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by zero_gravity)
That is generally the case in the US, but it does not mean the same in Canada. Note that colleges also have degree-awarding powers in Canada, only to a lesser extent than universities. This has been the case in recent years.

As I mentioned before, polytechnics are the closest thing to a college in Canada, which is why I made that comparison (for a better understanding). Colleges also offer vocational degrees, but they are usually classified as diplomas and certificates. I'm merely explaining (for lack of clarity) that they have a more practical approach to education.
Again not quite. At least based on what I hear from Canadian friends and colleagues
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zero_gravity
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(Original post by alleycat393)
Again not quite. At least based on what I hear from Canadian friends and colleagues
Hmm that's strange. Perhaps they are from different provinces? The legislation does vary across the country.
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alleycat393
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(Original post by zero_gravity)
Hmm that's strange. Perhaps they are from different provinces? The legislation does vary across the country.
University of British Colombia and university of Toronto are the two I know people at or applying to. Both studying and people who have worked there. Always referring to their unis as colleges or their college education. Anyway you’ve clarified the official terminology and the idea is that the OP will do their own research as well.
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zero_gravity
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(Original post by alleycat393)
University of British Colombia and university of Toronto are the two I know people at or applying to. Both studying and people who have worked there. Always referring to their unis as colleges or their college education. Anyway you’ve clarified the official terminology and the idea is that the OP will do their own research as well.
Ah, that might explain it. From what I understand, University of Toronto does have a college system. That is somewhat similar to the system at Oxbridge.

I'm not familiar with UBC, so I can't comment on that, but it's possible that they follow a similar system.

Even though U of T has this kind of system, it seems like this is only a small minority out of all the Canadian universities.

Thank you for your input on this and hopefully the OP will know which route to choose.
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SharminSSS
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Thanks to both of you for the detailed input. And, yes, I have understood the difference and I will be choosing to go to an university instead of a college.

Good luck to both of you!
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username3872488
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(Original post by alleycat393)
You'll have to look up to clarify. I know in the States they use the term colleges very loosely. This is a UK site so not many people may know.
When we say college, we mean university. Like “what college are you planning on going to” etc. There is also such a thing as community college not to be confused with private and public universities. Some people choose to go to comm college for 2 years then transfer to a university for the next two. It’s better to get straight into a university though. Best of luck!
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