Prefect1992
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#1
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Seriously why does literally Everyone say this....

I can understand why Americans use this phrase but when I hear my fellow brits using it... It's just cringe inducing

because

A) he literally isn't your president
B) You are not American, so again he isn't your president
C) You are not living under his government, he is not your president
D) you do not live in America, he is not your president

I don't care what you think about trump, but can people please stop using a phrase that doesn't apply to them

Thank you
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HorribleDude
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the sheeps can't stop...GO TRUMP! destroy that *****y ass country from the inside and you'll be welcomed like a hero by the rest of the world.
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Andrew97
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I can see why Americans say it. The British, well he isn’t. So what’s your point? If I turned around and said Rodrigo Duterte wasn’t my president I would get some strange looks.
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Prefect1992
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(Original post by Andrew97)
I can see why Americans say it. The British, well he isn’t. So what’s your point?
Because I'm sick to death of hearing fellow brits, who have no connections to America whatsoever saying 'Not my president' because they think it's some profound statement of protest I don't mind Americans using it but out of context I just find it irritating because the people that initially used the phrase are living in the United states of America, and fall under the jurisdiction of the U.S government wheras those currently using it don't.
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Andrew97
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(Original post by Dodo0099)
Because I'm sick to death of hearing fellow brits, who have no connections to America whatsoever saying 'Not my president' because they think it's some profound statement of protest I don't mind Americans using it but out of context I just find it irritating because the people that initially used the phrase are living in the United states of America, and fall under the jurisdiction of the U.S government wheras those currently using it don't.
The what’s your point was aimed at those saying it, not you. Should have been clearer.
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Prefect1992
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(Original post by Andrew97)
The what’s your point was aimed at those saying it, not you. Should have been clearer.
Sorry

Those saying it don't seem to take the context (mentioned in my previous post) into account.
The problem is without that context it's meaningless.....
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Drewski
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Colloquially, the position is known as "Leader of the free world".
I like to consider myself as being part of the free world.

Ergo, by some definitions the position can be considered to be my leader.
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Turquaz
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1. Sense of inclusivity.

2. What's wrong with having some fun?
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username917703
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it is embarrassing.

I cringe at Americanisms in general tbh.

See guys on here writing y'all, ass and many others.

You don't talk like that in real life so why do you do it on here?
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Prefect1992
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(Original post by Drewski)
Colloquially, the position is known as "Leader of the free world".
I like to consider myself as being part of the free world.

Ergo, by some definitions the position can be considered to be my leader.
By whom?

And also as you said, colloquially

If the position of PM was called ruler of the world would that make the statement true?
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Drewski
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(Original post by Dodo0099)
By whom?

And also as you said, colloquially

If the position of PM was called ruler of the world would that make the statement true?
By everybody. Don't be facetious.


Do I personally agree with that line of thinking? No. Does that mean it's wrong? No.
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Prefect1992
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(Original post by Turquaz)
1. Sense of inclusivity.

2. What's wrong with having some fun?
1. Inclusivity how?

2.Because it's just out of context.

I would just like to state publicly I'm indifferent to this whole affair, I don't care whether you love or loath trump or if , like me, you are indifferent towards the man but I would prefer it if people used more specific lexis, ie people could say, 'Trump doesn't represent the American people' the sentiment would be virtually the same, but more appropriate in the given context
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randomaccount1
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(Original post by Wilfred Little)
it is embarrassing.

I cringe at Americanisms in general tbh.

See guys on here writing y'all, ass and many others.

You don't talk like that in real life so why do you do it on here?
I second this completely.
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999tigger
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I havent seen British people saying it. I have hardly ever seen it on TSR.
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username3890778
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Pitbull is the president. He’s a worldwide president. They’re absolutely right.
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Prefect1992
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#16
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(Original post by Drewski)
By everybody. Don't be facetious.


Do I personally agree with that line of thinking? No. Does that mean it's wrong? No.
Actually I have never heard of that expression, nor have most of my friends, nor have most of my family. I am not being as you put it 'Facetious'

I can see where you are coming from but would you not agree that a more appropriate phrase such as 'Trump does not represent the American people' could be used in lieu of the phrase 'not my president' if said remark would be out of context?
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Reeeeyah
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I saw a British friend of mine using that hashtag on twitter and it's like wtf mate?
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Drewski
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(Original post by Dodo0099)
Actually I have never heard of that expression, nor have most of my friends, nor have most of my family. I am not being as you put it 'Facetious'
And you just checked with them all in those 8 minutes? Sure...


It's an extremely common phrase. Ridiculously so.
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SCIENCE :D
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Britain is becoming scarily Americanised thanks to the likes of Twitter and Instagram...

And I don't like where it is going.
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Prefect1992
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#20
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I havent seen British people saying it. I have hardly ever seen it on TSR.
I have not seen it on TSR but I have seen it elsewhere and heard people use the expression (out of context) on numerous occasions.
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