Frankly Franklyn
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I am currently in my first year of studding Btec Extended diploma Level 3 in IT. I'm aiming towards at least a DDD by the end of the course and then i'm planning to go to university to do software engineering.
I would like to know what the course is like for example, is it what you imagined, does it actually help you learn new skills in software engineering etc.

Go easy on me please, this is my first question. Thanks
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yt7777
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Where are you hoping to study?

I did Computer Science after my BTEC level 3 in IT but did several Software Engineering modules and it taught me really useful skills.

Aside from the general programming modules of which we were taught Java, C, Python, PHP, JS. The Software Engineering modules taught things like: SDLC, Development methodologies (like you learn in some of your BTEC modules e.g. Waterfall, V model, Spiral, Agile, XP etc.), Requirements Analysis, UML modelling, Test driven development, Design patterns (e.g. MVC, Singleton, Factory etc.), Secure coding, Function point analysis, HCI (UI/UX), Version control (Git and SVN), Software Language Engineering (learning how to build your own programming languages for specific purposes) and more stuff I can't remember off the top of my head, and we did a substantial Software Engineering team project having to follow the Scrum methodology.

My course was straight Computer Science, unfortunately for me they added a Software Engineering pathway when I was in my second year so couldn't take it 😂 but the people on that course, Computer Science (Software Eng.), get to do a team Software Engineering project in first year and in year 2 they get a substantial enterprise team project with a company, which is pretty cool!

I went to Royal Holloway BTW, if you wanted to read more about the course - https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/cour...gineering.aspx

The course also includes more general CS modules like: Mathematics, Algorithms, Databases, Web development, Info/Cyber Security, Games programming, Robotics programming, Digital Audio, Crypto, Semantic Web, Machine Learning, Optimization, loads more interesting stuff.

Hope this helps
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winterscoming
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The previous reply covered the kinds of modules you'll study. In general, yes all of those things are useful for a career in software engineering because they're the kinds of things employers expect graduates to know (Some of the most important skills are 'general' competencies like problem solving, computational thinking and analytical skills). Employers commonly ask a lot of tough questions when assessing graduates to separate the wheat from the chaff, which can range from being about anything related to OO concepts, to specific programming language features, to asking you to talk through solving a non-trivial problem, and very often you'll be asked to write code in the interview as well (at least, decent employers should always ask you to do this).

The other point to mention, if you're looking to study Software Engineering with the goal of doing that as your career, then make sure you choose a degree at a university which offers a 12-month sandwich placement year as part of the course.

It's really important to emphasise sandwich degree courses for subjects like this; employers recruiting Software Engineering graduates care a great deal about a candidate's aptitude, skills, experience and enthusiasm. Actually, they care more about those things than the university you go to, or the course you studied because there is a difference between being able to perform well in exams/assessments versus being competent enough to be able to work on real-world projects with deadlines and clients, fixing software defects, managing legacy code/systems, working within a team of other developers, etc.

While universities teach quite a few technical skills like the ones mentioned above (All really useful stuff to learn), and try to encourage you to solve all kinds of problems as part of your coursework/assignments, nearly all students who take a placement year find they learn more about the profession during their 12 month placement than the rest of the degree put together. It contributes a lot to your learning/training, and most importantly provides a huge boost to your employability in the eyes of anybody looking to hire graduates in that kind of job.
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yt7777
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(Original post by winterscoming)
The previous reply covered the kinds of modules you'll study. In general, yes all of those things are useful for a career in software engineering because they're the kinds of things employers expect graduates to know (Some of the most important skills are 'general' competencies like problem solving, computational thinking and analytical skills). Employers commonly ask a lot of tough questions when assessing graduates to separate the wheat from the chaff, which can range from being about anything related to OO concepts, to specific programming language features, to asking you to talk through solving a non-trivial problem, and very often you'll be asked to write code in the interview as well (at least, decent employers should always ask you to do this).

The other point to mention, if you're looking to study Software Engineering with the goal of doing that as your career, then make sure you choose a degree at a university which offers a 12-month sandwich placement year as part of the course.

It's really important to emphasise sandwich degree courses for subjects like this; employers recruiting Software Engineering graduates care a great deal about a candidate's aptitude, skills, experience and enthusiasm. Actually, they care more about those things than the university you go to, or the course you studied because there is a difference between being able to perform well in exams/assessments versus being competent enough to be able to work on real-world projects with deadlines and clients, fixing software defects, managing legacy code/systems, working within a team of other developers, etc.

While universities teach quite a few technical skills like the ones mentioned above (All really useful stuff to learn), and try to encourage you to solve all kinds of problems as part of your coursework/assignments, nearly all students who take a placement year find they learn more about the profession during their 12 month placement than the rest of the degree put together. It contributes a lot to your learning/training, and most importantly provides a huge boost to your employability in the eyes of anybody looking to hire graduates in that kind of job.
Agreed, and most good Computer Science or Software Engineering degrees should prepare the OP with these core skills.

Also to add, summer placements are really useful, I was lucky enough to get 2 paid summer placements (and 2 part time alongside my degree) and got offered graduate positions at 3 of these companies on completion of my studies. I found the benefit of this was that I managed to get the same amount of experience as a sandwich year without having to take the full year out, this extra year I've used to pursue an MSc - just something to think about.
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Frankly Franklyn
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(Original post by yt7777)
Agreed, and most good Computer Science or Software Engineering degrees should prepare the OP with these core skills.

Also to add, summer placements are really useful, I was lucky enough to get 2 paid summer placements (and 2 part time alongside my degree) and got offered graduate positions at 3 of these companies on completion of my studies. I found the benefit of this was that I managed to get the same amount of experience as a sandwich year without having to take the full year out, this extra year I've used to pursue an MSc - just something to think about.
Thanks for all the info, sorry it took so long for the reply; Google didn't let me log on till now.

What you 2 said gave me a lot of info on what subjects I will be doing in university which is really helpful. Although I have now changed my mind to studying computer science.

Now, I know it been a long time but would you 2 know whether a computer science course or even anything related to it is/was actually engaging, interesting as well as fun? Thanks again
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