Kalabamboo
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many amino acids can be metabolised and the products fed into the krebs cycle can be respired

I don't undertsand this can somebody help please?
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dreamfyre
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(Original post by Kalabamboo)
many amino acids can be metabolised and the products fed into the krebs cycle can be respired

I don't undertsand this can somebody help please?
they're are an alternative form of energy, instead of having glucose turned into pyruvate and then acetyl coa to enter krebs cycle, different amino acids can be converted by the body into products of the krebs cycle and then continue the process of respiration. for example deaminated asparagine and aspartate are converted into oxaloacetate - oxaloacetate is part of the krebs cycle so it can enter and continue the process. lipids can be converted into succinyl coa etc another product of the krebs cycle.
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Kalabamboo
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(Original post by dreamfyre)
they're are an alternative form of energy, instead of having glucose turned into pyruvate and then acetyl coa to enter krebs cycle, different amino acids can be converted by the body into products of the krebs cycle and then continue the process of respiration. for example deaminated asparagine and aspartate are converted into oxaloacetate - oxaloacetate is part of the krebs cycle so it can enter and continue the process. lipids can be converted into succinyl coa etc another product of the krebs cycle.
Thanks a lot!
so when they say "many amino acids can be metabolised and the products fed into the krebs cycle can be respired", does the metabolised bit mean respired and then whatever is produced from the respiration of the amino acids is used in the krebs cycle or is it produced by the krebs cycle? Is it to do with the product of the amino acid (after respiration of amino acid has occurred) being used as a repiratory substrate to produce ATP in substrate level phosphorylation but then I dont know how that works- iam just guessing

Please let me know your thoughts. Thanks a lot!
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dreamfyre
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(Original post by Kalabamboo)
Thanks a lot!
so when they say "many amino acids can be metabolised and the products fed into the krebs cycle can be respired", does the metabolised bit mean respired and then whatever is produced from the respiration of the amino acids is used in the krebs cycle or is it produced by the krebs cycle? Is it to do with the product of the amino acid (after respiration of amino acid has occurred) being used as a repiratory substrate to produce ATP in substrate level phosphorylation but then I dont know how that works- iam just guessing

Please let me know your thoughts. Thanks a lot!
metabolise just means a chemical reaction, the amino acids are converted into a substrate that can be used in the krebs cycle to continue the process of respiration. because ur feeding stuff into the krebs cycle, what is happening is you're allow the cycle to go around, and when that happens you get reduced co enzymes formed. these then are able to transfer their electrons into the complexes in the electron transport chain in the inner membrane of the mitochondrion to cause a change in proton gradient. the protons will go down their concentration gradient via the ATP synthase to form ATP.
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dreamfyre
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at alevel all u need to be aware of is that, fatty acids, amino acids etc can be used in the krebs cycle instead of glucose substrates - i wouldn't worry too much about it tbf
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Jpw1097
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(Original post by Kalabamboo)
many amino acids can be metabolised and the products fed into the krebs cycle can be respired

I don't undertsand this can somebody help please?
Amino acids can be classed as glucogenic and/or ketogenic. Glucogenic amino acids are those that can be broken down to form various intermediates in the Krebs cycle (e.g. fumarate, alpha-ketoglutarate). Furthermore, these amino acids can also be converted into glucose via gluconeogenesis. Ketogenic amino acids on the other hand can be broken down to form acetyl-CoA which, as you're probably aware, enters the Krebs cycle. These amino acids cannot be converted into glucose however, but they can be converted into ketone bodies. As you can see, all amino acids can be broken down and, in one way or another, be fed into the Krebs cycle to produce ATP (and of course, NADH and FADH2).
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