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    I wonder if anyone can give me advice; I'm interested in going to university but the course in which I am only interested in studying is Psychology. I just think it sounds interesting and it is a field I would like to learn more about. My only worry is that I'm not very strong in maths, nor science. But this is a social science so I wonder if it would be different.

    Does anyone who has studied/studying pyschology feel as though you need strong knowledge in science and maths before starting, or do you just pick them up along the course?
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    (Original post by wapaw)
    I wonder if anyone can give me advice; I'm interested in going to university but the course in which I am only interested in studying is Psychology. I just think it sounds interesting and it is a field I would like to learn more about. My only worry is that I'm not very strong in maths, nor science. But this is a social science so I wonder if it would be different.

    Does anyone who has studied/studying pyschology feel as though you need strong knowledge in science and maths before starting, or do you just pick them up along the course?
    Hi, I'm studying forensic psychology. It's not that different from straight psychology, only a couple of modules different. I still do all of the core psychology modules you would do on a straight psychology degree, so I feel I can help you a bit here.

    To answer, no you don't need strong knowledge of either, however it can be useful. I personally am very weak at maths, specifically mental maths. This is not a problem as most maths you do, you just input numbers into a computer programme, press some buttons and it does all the calculations for you. All you need to know is what order to press the buttons in. I have not done maths since GCSE and I'm doing fine at uni.

    Science would probably be a bit more useful to have, specifically biology. I took this at A-Level. This is because one of the sub-units of psychology is biopsychology. This is all about the brain and how electrical signals are sent around it, the structure of the brain, what different parts of the brain do etc. I also know that in my second year there's a module on neuropsychology (may be different depending on the university), so biology will be useful then.

    Having said that, science is still not necessary. You get taught everything you need to know. Lots of unis typically require their lecturers to have "office hours", which are literally just a few hours a week they sit in a room waiting for students to come and ask them questions. If you're ever stuck on something, lecturers are always happy to help.

    It may help you to do a little bit of reading around the course you have chosen, maybe see if the uni has any recommended textbooks you can have a flick through.
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    (Original post by DrawTheLine)
    Hi, I'm studying forensic psychology. It's not that different from straight psychology, only a couple of modules different. I still do all of the core psychology modules you would do on a straight psychology degree, so I feel I can help you a bit here.

    To answer, no you don't need strong knowledge of either, however it can be useful. I personally am very weak at maths, specifically mental maths. This is not a problem as most maths you do, you just input numbers into a computer programme, press some buttons and it does all the calculations for you. All you need to know is what order to press the buttons in. I have not done maths since GCSE and I'm doing fine at uni.

    Science would probably be a bit more useful to have, specifically biology. I took this at A-Level. This is because one of the sub-units of psychology is biopsychology. This is all about the brain and how electrical signals are sent around it, the structure of the brain, what different parts of the brain do etc. I also know that in my second year there's a module on neuropsychology (may be different depending on the university), so biology will be useful then.

    Having said that, science is still not necessary. You get taught everything you need to know. Lots of unis typically require their lecturers to have "office hours", which are literally just a few hours a week they sit in a room waiting for students to come and ask them questions. If you're ever stuck on something, lecturers are always happy to help.

    It may help you to do a little bit of reading around the course you have chosen, maybe see if the uni has any recommended textbooks you can have a flick through.
    Thank you!
 
 
 

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