What are Economics, Maths, Philosophy A level like?

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$evie$
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#1
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Hey xx please can someone let me know the answers to any of these questions xx
What do you cover in Economics?
How hard is economics for beginners?
What is your least favorite aspect of Economics?
How hard is Maths A level in comparison to GCSE?
How is maths taught?
How big is the jump from GCSE to A level for a grade 9 student?
How hard is Philosophy?
What do you cover in Philosophy?
What is your least favourite aspect of Philosophy?

Also, for all subjects mentioned what are the classes generally like: more girls or boys in the subjects, type of people who do the subject.
I will literally be soooooo grateful if you can answer any of the questions xx
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OPX348
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Currently in y13 and can answer for econ and maths. As a grade 9 student the jump in maths will be noticeable but not too difficult at AS. The problems will become more challenging and require a lot more working but as a grade 9 student you should be fine. As for econ, I never studied it before but that is no problem, most courses start from the basics and you will be amazed at how fast you pick up the concepts. It is a heavily essay based subject and does require a fair bit of time. If you have the intelligence for level 9 in maths A level econ will not be challenging.
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akpo
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(Original post by $evie$)
Hey xx please can someone let me know the answers to any of these questions xx
What do you cover in Economics?
How hard is economics for beginners?
What is your least favorite aspect of Economics?
How hard is Maths A level in comparison to GCSE?
How is maths taught?
How big is the jump from GCSE to A level for a grade 9 student?
How hard is Philosophy?
What do you cover in Philosophy?
What is your least favourite aspect of Philosophy?

Also, for all subjects mentioned what are the classes generally like: more girls or boys in the subjects, type of people who do the subject.
I will literally be soooooo grateful if you can answer any of the questions xx
My sixth form is dominantly male so i can't shed any light on that one still. &I'm in year 12.

1. Economics covers macro and micro (quite obvious) for macro, is about macroeconomic objectives, like unemployment, inflation, economic growth and balancce of payments, then transitions into some depth of these 4 topics individually, then it goes through Aggregate demand and supply (in long and short run), with some policies for economic growth, like monetary, but normally supply side policies. Micro, goes through this idea of Market failure caused by a failure to use the price mechanism to efficiently allocate resources, and the idea of how the economy cannot meet the demands on unlimited wants, due to limited resources (scarcity), brings initial ideas, like division of labour, then goes through demand and supply, which explains using diminshing marginal utility why prices decrease as quantity increases. After those easy chapters, it then gets more challenging as it gets to Market failure, but more government intervention and government failure.

2. I'm a beginner, and surprisingly at the top in my class, which i found very strange, not having studied Business&Economics or Economics at GCSE. It is not a easy a level (all a levels, in a way, are not necessarily easy, maybe easier than another), but some sort of interest is necessary because it will become very tedious as the content increases for chapters. It's not hard for beginners, in my opinion, but this is because i plan on doing an economics degree, so for others may vary.

3. Microeconomics is a very boring aspect of economics, well for year 12, in my opinion, the content is really not interesting, and when the exam is tailored on education and university, its really general knowledge, with some economic understanding, as exam technique is really important for (edexcel particularly) economics.

4. Maths A level, is very challenging, and is nothing like GCSE.

5. Maths teaching really depends on the school, not all maths teachers teach the same.

6. It is not that big, not at all, it'll start feeling easy, depending on whether you start on chapter 1. So topics that will look challenging for a grade 9 student will be further down chapters, as you notice content that did not appear at GCSE, like differentiation and integration and logarithms etc...

7. Philosophy being hard is dependent on the specification. I do OCR, so it is extremely intense. However, other exam borads are quite lenient with their exam structure therefore making it less content packed.

8. If its strictly Philosophy (AQA course, i'm assuming), it will mostly cover general philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, this is like the causation and design argument, and Plato or Aristotle's argument from the soul. There will also be some ethics chapters, like Kantian Ethics.

9. Well i do RS, and do not like the christianity chapter, but philosophy specifically, my least favourite aspect is problem of evil.
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$evie$
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Report Thread starter 2 years ago
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(Original post by akpo)
My sixth form is dominantly male so i can't shed any light on that one still. &I'm in year 12.

1. Economics covers macro and micro (quite obvious) for macro, is about macroeconomic objectives, like unemployment, inflation, economic growth and balancce of payments, then transitions into some depth of these 4 topics individually, then it goes through Aggregate demand and supply (in long and short run), with some policies for economic growth, like monetary, but normally supply side policies. Micro, goes through this idea of Market failure caused by a failure to use the price mechanism to efficiently allocate resources, and the idea of how the economy cannot meet the demands on unlimited wants, due to limited resources (scarcity), brings initial ideas, like division of labour, then goes through demand and supply, which explains using diminshing marginal utility why prices decrease as quantity increases. After those easy chapters, it then gets more challenging as it gets to Market failure, but more government intervention and government failure.

2. I'm a beginner, and surprisingly at the top in my class, which i found very strange, not having studied Business&Economics or Economics at GCSE. It is not a easy a level (all a levels, in a way, are not necessarily easy, maybe easier than another), but some sort of interest is necessary because it will become very tedious as the content increases for chapters. It's not hard for beginners, in my opinion, but this is because i plan on doing an economics degree, so for others may vary.

3. Microeconomics is a very boring aspect of economics, well for year 12, in my opinion, the content is really not interesting, and when the exam is tailored on education and university, its really general knowledge, with some economic understanding, as exam technique is really important for (edexcel particularly) economics.

4. Maths A level, is very challenging, and is nothing like GCSE.

5. Maths teaching really depends on the school, not all maths teachers teach the same.

6. It is not that big, not at all, it'll start feeling easy, depending on whether you start on chapter 1. So topics that will look challenging for a grade 9 student will be further down chapters, as you notice content that did not appear at GCSE, like differentiation and integration and logarithms etc...

7. Philosophy being hard is dependent on the specification. I do OCR, so it is extremely intense. However, other exam borads are quite lenient with their exam structure therefore making it less content packed.

8. If its strictly Philosophy (AQA course, i'm assuming), it will mostly cover general philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, this is like the causation and design argument, and Plato or Aristotle's argument from the soul. There will also be some ethics chapters, like Kantian Ethics.

9. Well i do RS, and do not like the christianity chapter, but philosophy specifically, my least favourite aspect is problem of evil.
Thank you, really helps me affirm my choices x
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davina_xox
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In economics a level you do micro and macro. You study the market and market failure things like that. I was a beginner at economics, I’m my second year now and it was quite easy to pick up quickly as long as you make sure you go over everything your teacher goes through and understand it properly. Least favourite aspect is that there’s a lot to cover in a short space of time. I do maths a level and the jump is massive, I found it a lot harder than any maths I had previously done. My maths is taught badly so maybe if I had a better teacher it would be a lot better. The jump depends on which subjects you’re going for although most are a massive jump, even for a grade 9 student. Philosophy is really great as long as you actually enjoy learning about philosophy and are interested in the ideas otherwise, like some of my classmates, you will fall behind. In philosophy we study metaphysics, moral philosophy and epistemology. I don’t have a least favourite aspect because I enjoy philosophy and am keen to learn whatever I can. In my economics it’s roughly and equal mix of boy and girls whereas for philosophy there are more girls but not drastically. And there’s a mix of different kinds of people in both but for philosophy people take the subject more seriously so I’d say it’s more for the real readers and those who are actually serious about the subject. Hope that helped!!
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_gracecharlie
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(currently in Y12 and I do Maths, Philosophy and History)

How hard is Maths A level in comparison to GCSE?
So far, I'm finding it okay..everyone makes a big deal of how hard it is but if you consistently put the work in its fine (make sure you're very confident with all algebra from GCSE and the other stuff of course but prioritise algebra)

How is maths taught?
This completely depends on your school/teachers/exam board but for me its much the same as GCSEs: introduce a technique, learn the rules then practice

How big is the jump from GCSE to A level for a grade 9 student?
Couldn't tell you I only got an 8 but I'm doing okay so I'm sure you would be too with a 9 (the thing is you can get good marks at GCSE and still not understand some of the algebra- because the grade boundaries can be quite low- which is the important part for a level so don't focus 100% on your grade more where within maths your strengths lie)

How hard is Philosophy?
Depends where your strengths lie, it requires skills like critical thinking/essay writing/problem solving etc if you've done GCSE RS it follows on quite nicely but they're definitely not the same. Content wise I'd say its a similar amount to history- an awful lot.

What do you cover in Philosophy?
Completely depends on what syllabus your school offers. I am on AQA and the modules (each 25% of the course are): metaphysics of God, metaphysics of the mind, moral philosophy and epistemology.

What is your least favourite aspect of Philosophy?
For me personally: the amount of content/ making sure my exam answers are correctly structured...nothing incurable just needs practice and revision like any other subject.
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