What are economics, maths and philosophy a level like? Watch

$evie$
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Hey xx please can someone let me know the answers to any of these questions xx
What do you cover in Economics?
How hard is economics for beginners?
What is your least favorite aspect of Economics?
How hard is Maths A level in comparison to GCSE?
How is maths taught?
How big is the jump from GCSE to A level for a grade 9 student?
How hard is Philosophy?
What do you cover in Philosophy?
What is your least favourite aspect of Philosophy?

Also, for all subjects mentioned what are the classes generally like: more girls or boys in the subjects, type of people who do the subject.

I will be sooooo grateful for anyone who can help xx
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TheDad2.0Grinder
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You can’t find a job with philosophy
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by $evie$)
What do you cover in Economics? What do you cover in Philosophy?
A cursory google search of the form "*exam board* A-level *subject*" will answer those questions for you, likely in far more depth than anyone on here...or at least to a comparable level...

(Original post by $evie$)
Also, for all subjects mentioned what are the classes generally like: more girls or boys in the subjects, type of people who do the subject
This will vary considerably from school to school and is more or less meaningless as a metric. An all girls school, for example, will have "more" girls than boys in all lessons for all subjects, one would presume.

As far as Maths goes, while I can't comment explicitly on the A-level syllabus since I followed another route through the material, in general there is a difference in teaching style and perhaps perceived difficulty between GCSE and A-level Mathematics. I personally found the A-level material far more engaging and was more willing to put the time in as the problems were more stimulating though, and thus found my experience in the A-level topics (broadly) more positive (and got better results).
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LMsav
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(Original post by TheDad2.0Grinder)
You can’t find a job with philosophy
Most unhelpful response ever. She’s asking about A level not degrees you idiot.
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$evie$
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(Original post by LMsav)
Most unhelpful response ever. She’s asking about A level not degrees you idiot.
Thanks xx
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$evie$
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(Original post by TheDad2.0Grinder)
You can’t find a job with philosophy
You can't make friends by being a **** either xx
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Sinnoh
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Year 12 here! I do maths and further maths but not philosophy or economics. I also did further pure maths IGCSE which covers a combination of 1st and 2nd year pure maths. That really set me up well for A level. My maths set, before I switched to further maths in October, was mostly boys; my further maths set is mostly Chinese girls. That said, pretty much half of year 12 at school does maths A level.
My initial impression of maths was that it's GCSE with added detail in things you never really did at GCSE. It's taught in a similar enough way to GCSE, chapter by chapter. Frequent tests for me. You need to have mastered GCSE maths techniques and knowledge to cope, which, if you can get a 9, you will. The first thing you're going to do that's properly new is probably algebraic long division, binomial expansion or simple calculus. Statistics as part of the maths course is a bigger leap from GCSE to A level - you're no longer being asked common sense questions.
2nd year maths requires you to be good at 1st year content. Some new content is introduced, but a fair bit of it is 1st year with added complexity and depth.
If you're good at maths and you get some satisfaction out of doing it, then you can cope fine with maths A level.
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emma.27
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Hiya! I'm a Year 12 Economics student. The two main areas of economics are microeconomics and macroeconomics - microeconomics (which you'll most likely start with) is small scale economics focusing on individual markets, and macroeconomics is on a larger scale, i.e. stuff about the national or global economy. I don't find Economics particularly hard, but it can vary from person to person. It's very much fact based, so if you have a decent memory and you like logical, factual subjects it will suit you. There are also plenty of diagrams to learn, some of which are more complicated than others. As for my least favourite area of the subject, it would have to be business economics, like long run average cost curve and returns to scale stuff, it's a bit boring. Macroeconomic stuff is particularly interesting, as is stuff like market failure and how governments correct them.
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$evie$
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Thank you really appreciate it xx
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$evie$
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(Original post by emma.27)
Hiya! I'm a Year 12 Economics student. The two main areas of economics are microeconomics and macroeconomics - microeconomics (which you'll most likely start with) is small scale economics focusing on individual markets, and macroeconomics is on a larger scale, i.e. stuff about the national or global economy. I don't find Economics particularly hard, but it can vary from person to person. It's very much fact based, so if you have a decent memory and you like logical, factual subjects it will suit you. There are also plenty of diagrams to learn, some of which are more complicated than others. As for my least favourite area of the subject, it would have to be business economics, like long run average cost curve and returns to scale stuff, it's a bit boring. Macroeconomic stuff is particularly interesting, as is stuff like market failure and how governments correct them.
tysm xxxx really appreciate your time x
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$evie$
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Year 12 here! I do maths and further maths but not philosophy or economics. I also did further pure maths IGCSE which covers a combination of 1st and 2nd year pure maths. That really set me up well for A level. My maths set, before I switched to further maths in October, was mostly boys; my further maths set is mostly Chinese girls. That said, pretty much half of year 12 at school does maths A level.
My initial impression of maths was that it's GCSE with added detail in things you never really did at GCSE. It's taught in a similar enough way to GCSE, chapter by chapter. Frequent tests for me. You need to have mastered GCSE maths techniques and knowledge to cope, which, if you can get a 9, you will. The first thing you're going to do that's properly new is probably algebraic long division, binomial expansion or simple calculus. Statistics as part of the maths course is a bigger leap from GCSE to A level - you're no longer being asked common sense questions.
2nd year maths requires you to be good at 1st year content. Some new content is introduced, but a fair bit of it is 1st year with added complexity and depth.
If you're good at maths and you get some satisfaction out of doing it, then you can cope fine with maths A level.
Thank youuuuuuuuu xx you're like my favourite person rn
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zsg
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hi I study theology and ethics (which is essentially ethics, philosophy and religion) and some topics I've studied are: inductive and deductive arguments for the existence of god, the problem of evil, psychology of religion, new atheism, religious experience etc.

It's my favourite a level out of the ones I do. we have plenty of debates and it's great looking at every side of an argument.

my least favourite topic probably was religious experience simply because I feel like it dragged a bit.

types of people in my class: A lot of the students study subjects like English, history, sociology and psychology. A few of us do sciences and some do design, media etc. I think it's a real mix bag. we have more girls in our class (around 13 maybe) and like 3 guys. But I know other classes have more boys than ours do.
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erxci
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A Level maths is an extension to GCSE maths in my opinion. The first couple topics is all GCSE content but then you start learning some new stuff which is really interesting, ngl. If you like maths, you'll enjoy the A-Level. There are some things I don't like, like graphs and statistics, but you might enjoy them. Hope that helped.
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TheDad2.0Grinder
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(Original post by $evie$)
You can't make friends by being a **** either xx
You shouldn't put kisses at the end of your sentences, makes you look like a whore...
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$evie$
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(Original post by TheDad2.0Grinder)
You shouldn't put kisses at the end of your sentences, makes you look like a whore...
You shouldn't post hate on other people's posts, makes you look thirsty xx
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ma_long
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Hey xx please can someone let me know the answers to any of these questions xx

What do you cover in Economics?

Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, Macroeconomics being how the global economy works and microeconomics being how businesses react to supply and demand changes

How hard is economics for beginners?

It's not hard, but you need a decent level of maths

What is your least favorite aspect of Economics?

Econometrics, but that is not done at A Level. It's where economics become statistics.

How hard is Maths A level in comparison to GCSE?

It's harder and there is a jump, if you are not getting at least an A in maths (old system) don't bother

How is maths taught?

Best way to learn maths is to do exercises

How big is the jump from GCSE to A level for a grade 9 student?

You will still feel it, but you will adjust

How hard is Philosophy?

I don't know

What do you cover in Philosophy?

I don't know

What is your least favourite aspect of Philosophy?

I don't know
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