School in the uk Watch

EmilyH1256
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#1
So I don’t get it ik someone 19 going To uni... so around what age to you finish high school ? Then I seen someone talk about collage at 16 then uni after college...? Someone explain this to me? It’s completely different in the us..
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
Marshmello's Dad
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 months ago
#2
(Original post by EmilyH1256)
So I don’t get it ik someone 19 going To uni... so around what age to you finish high school ? Then I seen someone talk about collage at 16 then uni after college...? Someone explain this to me? It’s completely different in the us..
Are you from America?
0
reply
random_matt
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 months ago
#3
US high school finishes at 18 right, and then to college (uni) right?
UK high school finishes at 16, then to college and finish at 18, and then onto uni.
0
reply
EmilyH1256
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#4
(Original post by Cxm)
Are you from America?
Yes I am
(Original post by random_matt)
US high school finishes at 18 right, and then to college (uni) right?
UK high school finishes at 16, then to college and finish at 18, and then onto uni.
And yes well most people finish 18-19 unless the get held back and then go to collage if they go... so what’s the difference between collage and uni ? Cus In the us it’s the same thing..
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
UWS
  • Answer Heroes
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 months ago
#5
We don't tend to refer to a university as a college, that's an American thing. College here is usually part of the Further Education system. It's not the same as going to university. Secondary school (high school) is part of the statutory education system.

This link may give you some more answers.
http://usic.sheffield.ac.uk/blog/201...lege-in-the-uk
0
reply
random_matt
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 9 months ago
#6
(Original post by EmilyH1256)
Yes I am

And yes well most people finish 18-19 unless the get held back and then go to collage if they go... so what’s the difference between collage and uni ? Cus In the us it’s the same thing..
In terms of difficulty i guess, school is level 1, college is level 2 and university is level 3.

The US probably just combines school and college together, my best guess anyway.
0
reply
Jenn_K
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 months ago
#7
University for us is college for you! What we call college is also known as sixth form and is equivalent of junior and senior year. We just take big exams before we start it and specialise in a few subject at this point
0
reply
Marshmello's Dad
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 9 months ago
#8
11 - 16 [Secondary School] This is a fixed period. When you complete your 5th year you have to leave to go to college.
16 - 18+ [College] You have to start college at 16 and stay until 18 by law but occasionally some people spend an extra year if they change their course.
18 - .. [Uni] You can start uni when you're 18 but a lot of people take a break between college and uni (Gap year). Technically you could start uni when you're 78 and finish when you're 83. There's no age limit.
1
reply
random_matt
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 9 months ago
#9
(Original post by Cxm)
11 - 16 [Secondary School] This is a fixed period. When you complete your 5th year you have to leave to go to college.
16 - 18+ [College] You have to start college at 16 and stay until 18 by law but occasionally some people spend an extra year if they change their course.
18 - .. [Uni] You can start uni when you're 18 but a lot of people take a break between college and uni (Gap year). Technically you could start uni when you're 78 and finish when you're 83. There's no age limit.
There was a 90+ year old doing a degree at one of my former university, hats off to him.
0
reply
EmilyH1256
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#10
(Original post by random_matt)
In terms of difficulty i guess, school is level 1, college is level 2 and university is level 3.

The US probably just combines school and college together, my best guess anyway.
(Original post by Jenn_K)
University for us is college for you! What we call college is also known as sixth form and is equivalent of junior and senior year. We just take big exams before we start it and specialise in a few subject at this point
(Original post by Cxm)
11 - 16 [Secondary School] This is a fixed period. When you complete your 5th year you have to leave to go to college.
16 - 18+ [College] You have to start college at 16 and stay until 18 by law but occasionally some people spend an extra year if they change their course.
18 - .. [Uni] You can start uni when you're 18 but a lot of people take a break between college and uni (Gap year). Technically you could start uni when you're 78 and finish when you're 83. There's no age limit.
Thanks guys I get it now .. everything is completely different from here to there.. I wanna move to the uk one day..
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
random_matt
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 9 months ago
#11
Move here, why?
I advocate anywhere in Scandinavia, but if you insist, go anywhere but London. I just never get the fascination with any filthy city over places like Kent, Cornwall etc.
0
reply
EmilyH1256
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#12
I just wanna go somewhere different I’ve live in the same city my whole life never been anywhere but Florida and I was 6 years old.. i wanna travel see the world like different places .. experience new things.. different cultures.. but I doubt it will ever happen..
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
artful_lounger
  • Community Assistant
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#13
Report 9 months ago
#13
As above, other than nomenclature regarding the word "college", in theory it's typical for UK students go to uni at the age of 18. However, students are funded by the local education authorities up until the age of 19, so some students will be slightly older depending on their route through further education. For example, it's very common for students applying to creative arts degrees to do an "art foundation" which is a yearlong course taken after the completion of their secondary education.

Furthermore, taking a "gap year" after finishing secondary school, before starting university, is quite common - while usually students will have already applied and hold an acceptance to the university of their choice, and will have deferred entry for a year to engage in other activities, some students will decide later to do so and will apply to university in this gap year.

It's also not uncommon for students applying to Oxford and Cambridge (you can only apply to one in any given application cycle) who fail to get a place the first time to try and reapply during a gap year (usually at a different college at the same one, although sometimes they will switch their application to the other if both offer the course). In a similar vein, some students find they do much better than expected, and while there is a process to allow them to "trade up" to an extent in the same application cycle, they may decide to take a gap year to apply to "higher ranked" universities.

Additionally, "mature students" applying to universities is a lot more common in the UK than in the US, who are defined as students over the age of 21.
0
reply
EmilyH1256
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#14
(Original post by artful_lounger)
As above, other than nomenclature regarding the word "college", in theory it's typical for UK students go to uni at the age of 18. However, students are funded by the local education authorities up until the age of 19, so some students will be slightly older depending on their route through further education.

Furthermore, taking a "gap year" after finishing secondary school, before starting university, is quite common - while usually students will have already applied and hold an acceptance to the university of their choice, and will have deferred entry for a year to engage in other activities, some students will decide later to do so and will apply to university in this gap year.

It's also not uncommon for students applying to Oxford and Cambridge (you can only apply to one in any given application cycle) who fail to get a place the first time to try and reapply during a gap year (usually at a different college at the same one, although sometimes they will switch their application to the other if both offer the course). In a similar vein, some students find they do much better than expected, and while there is a process to allow them to "trade up" to an extent in the same application cycle, they may decide to take a gap year to apply to "higher ranked" universities.

Additionally, "mature students" applying to universities is a lot more common in the UK than in the US, who are defined as students over the age of 21.
Yea a lot of people in the us well atleast where I live go to community collages.. for like 2-4 years for nursing and stuff like that... the smaller careers .. n if they go for like law , doctors they normally go out of the state for collage..
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
SMEGGGY
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 9 months ago
#15
(Original post by EmilyH1256)
So I don’t get it ik someone 19 going To uni... so around what age to you finish high school ? Then I seen someone talk about collage at 16 then uni after college...? Someone explain this to me? It’s completely different in the us..
School
College
University

Simple as that
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
EmilyH1256
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#16
(Original post by SMEGGGY)
School
College
University

Simple as that
Yea I was saying like the ages it happens cus I’ve seen people make threads about collage n they are only 16 but the other saying stuff about uni n they are 18-19.. so I was like wow it’s completely different there and was just curious..
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
isaidsteamedhams
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#17
Report 9 months ago
#17
(Original post by UWS)
We don't tend to refer to a university as a college, that's an American thing. College here is usually part of the Further Education system. It's not the same as going to university. Secondary school (high school) is part of the statutory education system.

This link may give you some more answers.
http://usic.sheffield.ac.uk/blog/201...lege-in-the-uk
eeeeeeey there he is listen to uws over there he knows whats up
0
reply
The Scotfather
Badges: 18
#18
Report 9 months ago
#18
(Original post by EmilyH1256)
Yea I was saying like the ages it happens cus I’ve seen people make threads about collage n they are only 16 but the other saying stuff about uni n they are 18-19.. so I was like wow it’s completely different there and was just curious..
In Scotland you can go to University at 16 and I know people who have. We stay in school until 18 (6th year) but you can apply for university in 5th year. I know someone who was 16 when she went but that was only because she had a late birthday and was in 5th year. So as a way to think, you need to be in 5th year in Scotland to atleast apply to university.
reply
EmilyH1256
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 9 months ago
#19
(Original post by chrissy99)
In Scotland you can go to University at 16 and I know people who have. We stay in school until 18 (6th year) but you can apply for university in 5th year. I know someone who was 16 when she went but that was only because she had a late birthday and was in 5th year. So as a way to think, you need to be in 5th year in Scotland to atleast apply to university.
That’s cool... man I wish I didn’t live here no more l could have been out of uni by now and have a amazing job...
Posted on the TSR App. Download from Apple or Google Play
0
reply
The Scotfather
Badges: 18
#20
Report 9 months ago
#20
(Original post by EmilyH1256)
That’s cool... man I wish I didn’t live here no more l could have been out of uni by now and have a amazing job...
Its worthwhile to note that degree structures are different though but you can choose a 3 year degree instead of a 4 year degree at the majority of universities as 4 year degrees are the main option.
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Bath
    Undergraduate Virtual Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Ravensbourne University London
    School of Design, School of Media Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19
  • Leeds Trinity University
    PGCE Open Day Further education
    Sat, 23 Feb '19

Do you have a food intolerance or allergy?

Yes - a food intolerance (23)
15.13%
Yes - a food allergy (14)
9.21%
Yes - an autoimmune disorder (i.e coeliac, colitis) (4)
2.63%
Yes - I have an intolerance and allergy (6)
3.95%
No (105)
69.08%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise