Yr_11_MATHS
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For the Computer Science questions that ask you to write an algorithm, could you write in python or does it have to be psuedocode?
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Hammad(214508)
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If it is on paper it must be pseudo code, never write in a programming language on Paper.
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Art111111
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(Original post by Hammad(214508))
If it is on paper it must be pseudo code, never write in a programming language on Paper.
I write mine in QBasic but thats because its the language we are forced to use for our coursework. It might as well be pseudocode though.
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Hammad(214508)
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What level are you on?
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winterscoming
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You can use any language - it doesn't need to be syntactically correct - the most important thing is that your intent is clear, and that it demonstrates your ability to describe the algorithm using simple programming constructs - which may or may not be the same as the constructs from a well-known programming language.

The most important thing is that an examiner is easily able to comprehend your answer and see that you have a firm grasp on the algorithm concepts - those questions are designed to test your understanding. They are not a test of memory, so you won't gain or lose any marks for writing code which will or won't compile.

You can write pseudocode which bears similarity with any popular programming language such as Python, Java, Delphi or Visual Basic, or you can use a well-known pseudocode language standard, or, provided your intent is clear, you can invent your own.

With these types of questions, the specific language you use and the specific syntax is rather irrelevant, as long as the intent is absolutely clear, and as long as you are consistent (for example, if you're going to use words like "Repeat Until" to describe a loop, don't describe the same construct in the using different words like "For", because that could be confusing)
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Yr_11_MATHS
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Thanks guys but do you not think that using psuedocode would be the safest option since not every school learns the same programming language and that there is only one mark scheme.
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winterscoming
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(Original post by JonathanChiu21)
Thanks guys but do you not think that using psuedocode would be the safest option since not every school learns the same programming language and that there is only one mark scheme.
Does your school or exam board specify a pseudocode standard? If so then yes it is better to stick to that (particularly if you're provided a reference for that standard in the exam, then the examiner will probably be expecting you to use that). It's important to stress that algorithm questions in exams are all about testing your understanding of those algorithms and your ability to think computationally - those questions are not at all about memorising pseudocode conventions.

If your school/exam board has no standards, then you just need to use whatever seems sensible - many programmers write pseudocode which resembles a programming language which they're familiar with.
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Yr_11_MATHS
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(Original post by winterscoming)
Does your school or exam board specify a pseudocode standard? If so then yes it is better to stick to that (particularly if you're provided a reference for that standard in the exam, then the examiner will probably be expecting you to use that). It's important to stress that algorithm questions in exams are all about testing your understanding of those algorithms and your ability to think computationally - those questions are not at all about memorising pseudocode conventions.

If your school/exam board has no standards, then you just need to use whatever seems sensible - many programmers write pseudocode which resembles a programming language which they're familiar with.
Well my teacher seems to keep telling us to use Psuedocode or flow charts but he still gave me full marks in my mocks in those type of algorithm questions
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winterscoming
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(Original post by JonathanChiu21)
Well my teacher seems to keep telling us to use Psuedocode or flow charts but he still gave me full marks in my mocks in those type of algorithm questions
Presumably as long as you don't use advanced features of Python (e.g. list comprehensions), then there won't be much difference between writing Pseudocode vs writing Python anyway. Unless the school or exam board have a standard, then you could write Pseudocode which looks similar to Python, but perhaps you could add more plain English too - for example, you could use "Then" at the end of an 'if' condition, and you could put Begin/End around things like functions, loops, if/else blocks, etc.

If he gave you full marks in the mock then he must think that you understand the concepts well enough to do the same in the real exam. Also, he probably knows what the examiners prefer too, so if he wants you to use pseudocode and flowcharts, then it's probably for a good reason.

The other thing to remember is that the model answers which the examiners use are probably written using the exam board's pseudocode, so that could be easier for them to mark it properly.
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Yr_11_MATHS
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(Original post by winterscoming)
Presumably as long as you don't use advanced features of Python (e.g. list comprehensions), then there won't be much difference between writing Pseudocode vs writing Python anyway. Unless the school or exam board have a standard, then you could write Pseudocode which looks similar to Python, but perhaps you could add more plain English too - for example, you could use "Then" at the end of an 'if' condition, and you could put Begin/End around things like functions, loops, if/else blocks, etc.

If he gave you full marks in the mock then he must think that you understand the concepts well enough to do the same in the real exam. Also, he probably knows what the examiners prefer too, so if he wants you to use pseudocode and flowcharts, then it's probably for a good reason.

The other thing to remember is that the model answers which the examiners use are probably written using the exam board's pseudocode, so that could be easier for them to mark it properly.
Thanks for your help bro
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