LEX192
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PQ
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(Original post by LEX192)
I’m currently 17 (in year 12) and I think I want to study psychology at uni, I have 2-3 days to find some work experience to apply for (1 week placement) but I have no idea what would help me to get into uni for psychology?? Any suggestions???
Psychology is an academic degree. You don’t need work experience and work experience won’t improve your chances of getting offers.

Use your work experience for a job you’re interested in trying out.
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iplcr4
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I did my WEX in a school for special needs children - normally fairly easy to find and get on to. It isn’t so much ‘work’ and feels more like volunteering, but I think was really useful for my personal statement. There’s not much point going to an office for WEX at this age, because it doesn’t add much to your UCAS application; it looks much better to do something in your field.
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PQ
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(Original post by iplcr4)
I did my WEX in a school for special needs children - normally fairly easy to find and get on to. It isn’t so much ‘work’ and feels more like volunteering, but I think was really useful for my personal statement. There’s not much point going to an office for WEX at this age, because it doesn’t add much to your UCAS application; it looks much better to do something in your field.
The vast majority of psychology graduates go into office jobs.
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iplcr4
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(Original post by PQ)
The vast majority of psychology graduates go into office jobs.
Very true, but if you want to show your passion and interest in a field, it never hurts to do a week of WEX in the field you’re interested in - especially if you’re trying to sell yourself to a university.
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LEX192
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(Original post by PQ)
Psychology is an academic degree. You don’t need work experience and work experience won’t improve your chances of getting offers.

Use your work experience for a job you’re interested in trying out.
Thanks for your reply, why wouldn’t WEX help my chances? And what kind of job do you suggest I try if I only have a week to do so?
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LEX192
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(Original post by iplcr4)
I did my WEX in a school for special needs children - normally fairly easy to find and get on to. It isn’t so much ‘work’ and feels more like volunteering, but I think was really useful for my personal statement. There’s not much point going to an office for WEX at this age, because it doesn’t add much to your UCAS application; it looks much better to do something in your field.
Thank you for your reply! Last year I did a week work experience at a nursery (this was before I decided I wanted to study psychology) and I’m unsure of what to do this year... would it be useful to do another week of WEX or should I just ‘read around my subject’ which others have suggested?
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iplcr4
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I did two weeks of WEX in the same placement, just because that’s what my school forced me to do aha! I would say that one is enough, but visit exhibitions that relate to psychology - really like the science museum Who Am I exhibition. Reading around is good, find Ted Talks you’re interested in etc.

I think the main thing that made my personal statement stand out was EPQ, which is a big commitment but it really did form the basis of my personal statement. If your school offer it, I’d look into it as it is more similar to university standard work than A Level. I’m not an admissions officer at a uni, but I’m in Year 13 and had very good feedback on my personal statement. Hope this helps and good luck finding a place!
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LEX192
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(Original post by iplcr4)
I did two weeks of WEX in the same placement, just because that’s what my school forced me to do aha! I would say that one is enough, but visit exhibitions that relate to psychology - really like the science museum Who Am I exhibition. Reading around is good, find Ted Talks you’re interested in etc.

I think the main thing that made my personal statement stand out was EPQ, which is a big commitment but it really did form the basis of my personal statement. If your school offer it, I’d look into it as it is more similar to university standard work than A Level. I’m not an admissions officer at a uni, but I’m in Year 13 and had very good feedback on my personal statement. Hope this helps and good luck finding a place!
Thank you for your reply! I think he school offer an EPQ as I have heard someone mention it however I have no idea what it is (apart from a project which isn’t related to one of your subjects?)
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iplcr4
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The EPQ is essentially a project based on a question that you make up. You have to track you progress - out school used a website called project Q - and kind of show how you’re planning to research, write and present. You have to produce either a 5000 word report or a 1000 word report and an artefact - the latter is normally what art/photography students do. Then, you have to give a 10 min presentation based on your research project. By the end of it all you will receive a grade, just like an A Level grade.

It is time consuming and stressful, but i do think it is beneficial; some unis even lowered their offers for me because I got an A in my EPQ.

Speak to students in the year above if they’ve done one and ask them how intense they found it as it does all depend on your time management and whether you procrastinate a lot - I definitely did lol
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PQ
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(Original post by LEX192)
Thanks for your reply, why wouldn’t WEX help my chances? And what kind of job do you suggest I try if I only have a week to do so?
Because the degree is 100% academic. Your PS needs to show academic interests outside your curriculum and research into the content of the degree. There’s no work experience that would help with that. If you spend too much of your PS talking about counselling or similar then you’re just demonstrating that you haven’t researched what a psychology degree involves or leads to.

A lot of psych graduates go into marketing, market research and HR. So maybe contact some local agencies or large organisations with those departments. Those sorts of departments are usually pretty open and used to offering placements.
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PQ
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(Original post by iplcr4)
Very true, but if you want to show your passion and interest in a field, it never hurts to do a week of WEX in the field you’re interested in - especially if you’re trying to sell yourself to a university.
Psychology degrees don’t prepare you for working with SEN children. It’s not a relevant placement for the degree.
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LEX192
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(Original post by iplcr4)
The EPQ is essentially a project based on a question that you make up. You have to track you progress - out school used a website called project Q - and kind of show how you’re planning to research, write and present. You have to produce either a 5000 word report or a 1000 word report and an artefact - the latter is normally what art/photography students do. Then, you have to give a 10 min presentation based on your research project. By the end of it all you will receive a grade, just like an A Level grade.

It is time consuming and stressful, but i do think it is beneficial; some unis even lowered their offers for me because I got an A in my EPQ.

Speak to students in the year above if they’ve done one and ask them how intense they found it as it does all depend on your time management and whether you procrastinate a lot - I definitely did lol
Ahh I am very good at procrastinating! Haha... what kind of project can you do it on? Have you got any example questions?
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iplcr4
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They have to be quite precise. I did something on a type of alternative therapy for dementia. Another girl in my school did something about sleep/dream psychology. There’s lots of things, just think of something your interested in
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iplcr4
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Psychology degrees don’t prepare you for working with SEN children. It’s not a relevant placement for the degree.
No, but it meant I learnt more about language, autism and development which is relevant to psychology. In no means do I think that a psych degree makes me qualified to do this type of work. Regardless, it was a valuable experience for me which I thoroughly enjoyed. It was whole heartedly the best thing I have ever done.
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LEX192
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(Original post by iplcr4)
They have to be quite precise. I did something on a type of alternative therapy for dementia. Another girl in my school did something about sleep/dream psychology. There’s lots of things, just think of something your interested in
Ok! I was just going to ask if dream psychology would be an option because I’ve always been interested in that side of the subject, thanks for your help!
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Little Popcorns
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(Original post by PQ)
Psychology is an academic degree. You don’t need work experience and work experience won’t improve your chances of getting offers.

Use your work experience for a job you’re interested in trying out.
That’s not true but you’re right that if the OP is going to put too much time and effort into work experience that they don’t get good grades that isn’t worth it. The most important thing to getting into uni is OP’s grades. But we presume OP wants to have a relevant career afterwards? In which case, they shouldn’t just put off work experience until after their degree. However during their degree it’s quite often the case that they’ll give them info about work/careers.
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(Original post by Little Popcorns)
That’s not true but you’re right that if the OP is going to put too much time and effort into work experience that they don’t get good grades that isn’t worth it. The most important thing to getting into uni is OP’s grades. But we presume OP wants to have a relevant career afterwards? In which case, they shouldn’t just put off work experience until after their degree. However during their degree it’s quite often the case that they’ll give them info about work/careers.
Which part is not true? That psychology degrees are academic? Or that work experience isn’t a pre-requisite or advantage for getting offers?

I didn’t say anything about not bothering with work experience (even pre degree never mind during undergraduate studies) just that it’s not required for entry onto a psychology degree.
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