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    Looking for anyone that has done this course at either of the above and what your opinion of the course and the uni please. Transferring into the 2nd year?
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    I will be graduating from the University of Westminster this year. The Journalism course is taught on Harrow campus, situated 20 minutes away from central London on the Metropolitan line, which is also the biggest and most creative of all campuses. It hosts students from a wide range of creative courses from Journalism and PR to Fashion, Contemporary Music Practice and Animation, so it is a really vibrant, fun and diverse environment to be in. We have a bar on campus and there is always something going on: student media and societies, networking events or workshops and guest speakers from the industry. The university has a long tradition in teaching journalism and media theory and the majority of our lecturers and tutors are media and journalism practitioners with years of experience, which I think is crucial for a course as practice orientated as this one.
    The second year is very much where you start to modify the course according to your ambitions or interests. If the first year is all about learning the basics of news and feature writing, finding stories and dealing with sources, the second year is really about getting into specialist journalism and gaining a context of the industry. I think it is a really good mixture of obligatory elements of contemporary journalism, like modules on Media Law and Ethics and Creating Modern Magazines, and a wealth of optional modules, which really makes the course stand out. You can chose anything from Literary or Technology, Politics or Investigative, Sports, International or Fashion Journalism. And the university offers a wide variety of cross-faculty or cluster choices like PR, Talk Radio, languages and modules from across the faculties. Furthermore, if you are up for a challenge, in the second semester of the second year, you can go on exchange and experience a different culture. I have had friends who went to the US, Australia and Spain. Coming into the third year, the focus falls, on the Dissertation or Extended Essay and the Final Journalism Project, allowing you to demonstrate all that you have learnt on a topic and in a format of your choice. Overall, the ability to alter the course's content according to your interests, the academic and practical support provided and the variety of opportunities to learn and develop both within the course and outside it motivated me to choose the University of Westminster for my degree and now I believe I will be graduating with the right skill set as a result. Hope I helped.
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    (Original post by Asya96)
    I will be graduating from the University of Westminster this year. The Journalism course is taught on Harrow campus, situated 20 minutes away from central London on the Metropolitan line, which is also the biggest and most creative of all campuses. It hosts students from a wide range of creative courses from Journalism and PR to Fashion, Contemporary Music Practice and Animation, so it is a really vibrant, fun and diverse environment to be in. We have a bar on campus and there is always something going on: student media and societies, networking events or workshops and guest speakers from the industry. The university has a long tradition in teaching journalism and media theory and the majority of our lecturers and tutors are media and journalism practitioners with years of experience, which I think is crucial for a course as practice orientated as this one.
    The second year is very much where you start to modify the course according to your ambitions or interests. If the first year is all about learning the basics of news and feature writing, finding stories and dealing with sources, the second year is really about getting into specialist journalism and gaining a context of the industry. I think it is a really good mixture of obligatory elements of contemporary journalism, like modules on Media Law and Ethics and Creating Modern Magazines, and a wealth of optional modules, which really makes the course stand out. You can chose anything from Literary or Technology, Politics or Investigative, Sports, International or Fashion Journalism. And the university offers a wide variety of cross-faculty or cluster choices like PR, Talk Radio, languages and modules from across the faculties. Furthermore, if you are up for a challenge, in the second semester of the second year, you can go on exchange and experience a different culture. I have had friends who went to the US, Australia and Spain. Coming into the third year, the focus falls, on the Dissertation or Extended Essay and the Final Journalism Project, allowing you to demonstrate all that you have learnt on a topic and in a format of your choice. Overall, the ability to alter the course's content according to your interests, the academic and practical support provided and the variety of opportunities to learn and develop both within the course and outside it motivated me to choose the University of Westminster for my degree and now I believe I will be graduating with the right skill set as a result. Hope I helped.
    Many thanks for your reply, it was very much appreciated.

    I have passed it over to my son in case he has any other questions.

    Kindest regards
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    Hi its will (my mum is the one who started this thread)..i just have a couple of questions if thats okay? 1) if i transfer into second year am i missing much in the first year?
    2) what is the westminister su like and are the media societies (smoke radio etc)really good and go well with the course?
    3) what pathways in second and third year did you chose?
    4) is there alot of coursework and what is the coursework like (I like a challenge so would rather there be alot of work) thank you so much, Will!
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    Hello. Not at all, I am glad I can help. Like I said, the first year is about learning the basics of news and feature writing. They teach how to conduct interviews, how to structure and find stories and about lifestyle journalism and reporting. We are also introduced to online journalism and digital storytelling and how to create and produce magazines. There are also compulsory theory modules, which tackle fundamental issues in media theory like surveillance, consumer society, public sphere and others. If you will be transferring from another Journalism course, you would not have missed much in the sense of practical journalistic skills and story construction. What might have an impact during the second year is what has been taught on the theory modules but the reading lists should be available to you then anyway.
    The second year really offers a chance to personalise the course and adjust it to your own professional interests. There are two main optional Journalism modules: Specialist Journalism and Multimedia Storytelling and Production. The options within the Specialist Journalism module are Fashion, Sport, Literary and Long Form and International Journalism. The ones within Multimedia Storytelling and Production are Broadcast and Online. I studied Literary and Long Form Journalism and Online Journalism. Specialist Journalism continues into the third year and includes Arts and Entertainment, Technology and Video Games and Investigative and Data Journalism. I chose the Arts and Entertainment option. In addition, there are a number of cluster and cross-faculty choices which you can choose from.
    Coursework is often challenging, yes. There often are Journalism assessments clashing with essays and academic projects so it is definitely a test of time-management skills. Depending on your choices, you will either have more things to write, produce, film, design or assemble. The core modules really demand a variety of things, for example, you will spend one semester in the second year producing a dummy magazine, while dealing with your other deadlines. In the third year, you will have to run and update a live website on a regular basis, producing copy, video and audio material to keep it running. In terms of quantity of work that needs to be done, the second year is definitely more challenging and hard to organise. In terms of the duration and expected quality of your workload, the third year is, at least in my opinion, quite challenging, especially in that dangerous period when the first part of the final project finishes the second part and the dissertation begin.
    Our Student Union is really lively and vibrant and there are always ways to get involved. You can apply to work for them and take part in various activities and events held by them. Smoke Media is the umbrella term we use for our student media outlets: Smoke Magazine, Smoke TV, Smoke Radio and The QH Newspaper. I personally think that contributing to any outlet is an outstanding opportunity to further develop skills gained on the course and put your own creative stamp on what that outlet produces. Every outlet hires a new editorial team fairly regularly so there are many opportunities to get involved with production and design as well as writing. I have been contributing to the magazine since I started the course and I feel it has really enabled me to experiment with different writing styles and genres. It is also great fun too. Smoke Radio wins student radio awards regularly and is also a great opportunity. You can apply to do your own show or produce your own documentary. I have colleagues who regularly do their own shows and have learnt a lot from that experience. Overall, as long as you are really passionate about a topic or an outlet, there are always opportunities to get involved. Hope I helped. Let me know if you have any other questions.
 
 
 

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