What math modules are the best for prerequisite knowledge for a uni course in CS?

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Paranoid_Glitch
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Between FP1 - FP3, D1 - D2, S1 - S2 and M1 - M3 what modules (Edexcel) should I pick up (I can only pick 3, maybe 4 of them) as prerequisite knowledge for an undergrad CS course? If the content taught In any of modules goes above what Is taught at uni, I don't have a problem.

Note: I've already done C1 - C4.
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Devvo666
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D1 and D2 are relatively easy and also have some programming related subjects. FP1-4 are probably the hardest out of them but not sure how they would relate to CS.
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Realitysreflexx
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Further Maths, but CS math is odd... you will need to hit the books hard, has some of the highest drop out rates good ole CS.. (though its not really an old subject lol)
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artful_lounger
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The most relevant areas are matrix algebra (i.e. linear algebra), aspects of group theory for some of the more theoretical parts of CS (this is/was in some of the FP modules previously I believe - this is very much on the much more theoretical side though...), and sometimes proof. The content in decision/discrete maths is sometimes relevant but sometimes more specific to certain applied areas of CS (and generally, computational mathematics as used in CS/maths/engineering). You will cover all the matrix algebra/linear algebra stuff at most unis, and more typically - you'll also usually have a basic introduction to proof.

All the calculus, infinite series, and differential equations CAN be relevant, depending somewhat on the "flavour" of the course - for more computer engineering style courses with more content on electronics and signal processing, this is essential. These areas underpin contemporary computer science anyway though so, still relevant. As above, you'll probably cover more or less of this in most uni courses anyway - at least the core single variable calculus and infinite series stuff.

I'd say overall the Further Pure options are perhaps more generally useful, and particularly for more theoretical/academic courses (which the "top" courses tend to be). The discrete/decision content is still reasonably relevant, and increasingly more so for more "applied" areas/courses including in e.g. computational physics, financial computing, software engineering, bioinformatics etc. So...your mileage may vary. In general terms, as above, I think the FP options are at least nominally better preparation for a CS degree. That said a lot of the FP content can be a lot less relevant, like hyperbolic functions, conic sections and so on...but the mathematical thinking is still useful to experience I suppose.
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