What would happen if both labour and tories got the same number of seats? Watch

username3031330
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Who would win? Would the queen choose? If there is no majority?
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Drewski
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Arm wrestle at the dispatch box.





Serious answer; they'd see who could get a deal with another party and have a coalition government with a majority.
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ed98
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Depends on the other parties. Labour would probably form a minority or coalition government with the SNP and possibly the Greens and/or Lib Dems.
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04MR17
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The Monster Ravings Loonys should win by default in that scenario. Shame nobody agrees with me.:emo:
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MrDystopia
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(Original post by a_british_pie)
Who would win? Would the queen choose? If there is no majority?
This would imply that no party got a majority (326 seats). In which case, they would enter into negotiations to try and form a coalition government made up of two or more parties.
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username3031330
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(Original post by MrDystopia)
This would imply that no party got a majority (326 seats). In which case, they would enter into negotiations to try and form a coalition government made up of two or more parties.
Thank you.
And what is the other parties who they try to form a coalition with don't want to join? And they are still left with no majority?
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MrDystopia
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(Original post by a_british_pie)
Thank you.
And what is the other parties who they try to form a coalition with don't want to join? And they are still left with no majority?
Yup. Two of the recent elections deal with this kind of scenario:

In 2010 (See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...election,_2010), no party won a majority of 326 seats. So what followed was negotiations (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_U...ment_formation) until the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats formally joined a coalition together, taking them above the majority.

In 2017 (See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...election,_2017), once again no party won a majority. In this case, the Conservatives and Democratic Unionist Party decided to agree to a 'confidence and supply' arrangement. So this isn't a formal coalition (thus technically the Tories govern as a minority), but it is an agreement that the DUP will for the most part support the Tories in passing their bills through Parliament.
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username2911200
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(Original post by a_british_pie)
Thank you.
And what is the other parties who they try to form a coalition with don't want to join? And they are still left with no majority?
That is exactly what happened in our last election in 2017. If Theresa May had made a coalition with the Lib Dems she'd have had a 'working majority' with their 12 MPs which would have jointly taken them over the 326 needed, with Theresa May still as Prime Minister. Tim Farron, the Lib Dem leader at the time, refused to enter into a coalition with anybody.

Theresa May then struck a 'confidence and supply' deal with the DUP, which isn't a coalition. The DUP said they would vote to agree with the decisions Theresa May wanted to make and with their 10 MPs that would push over the 326 seats needed. It's an informal agreement which either side can break at any time (the DUP has already threatened to do this multiple times).
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username3031330
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(Original post by Glassapple)
That is exactly what happened in our last election in 2017. If Theresa May had made a coalition with the Lib Dems she'd have had a 'working majority' with their 12 MPs which would have jointly taken them over the 326 needed, with Theresa May still as Prime Minister. Tim Farron, the Lib Dem leader at the time, refused to enter into a coalition with anybody.

Theresa May then struck a 'confidence and supply' deal with the DUP, which isn't a coalition. The DUP said they would vote to agree with the decisions Theresa May wanted to make and with their 10 MPs that would push over the 326 seats needed. It's an informal agreement which either side can break at any time (the DUP has already threatened to do this multiple times).
Thank you for this info! And what happens if no party wants to form either a coalition government or a confidence or supply deal. Would there have to be another general election held?
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username3031330
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(Original post by MrDystopia)
Yup. Two of the recent elections deal with this kind of scenario:

In 2010 (See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...election,_2010), no party won a majority of 326 seats. So what followed was negotiations (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_U...ment_formation) until the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats formally joined a coalition together, taking them above the majority.

In 2017 (See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...election,_2017), once again no party won a majority. In this case, the Conservatives and Democratic Unionist Party decided to agree to a 'confidence and supply' arrangement. So this isn't a formal coalition (thus technically the Tories govern as a minority), but it is an agreement that the DUP will for the most part support the Tories in passing their bills through Parliament.
Thank you for this info! And what happens if no party wants to form either a coalition government or a confidence or supply deal. Would there have to be another general election held?
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SamKent19
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I don't understand what the votes are for??
So are councillors inferior to MPs, so any issues we report to councillors, councillors report to MPs?
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username3031330
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(Original post by ReadySalted28)
I don't understand what the votes are for??
So are councillors inferior to MPs, so any issues we report to councillors, councillors report to MPs?
General election vote
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MrDystopia
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(Original post by a_british_pie)
Thank you for this info! And what happens if no party wants to form either a coalition government or a confidence or supply deal. Would there have to be another general election held?
A government could try to govern as a minority. This happened in the February 1974 election (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United..._February_1974) where Labour couldn't win a majority, nor form a coalition. Ultimately these don't really work well and so they ended up calling a second general election that year in October.

(Original post by ReadySalted28)
I don't understand what the votes are for??
So are councillors inferior to MPs, so any issues we report to councillors, councillors report to MPs?
Councillors are people elected to take part in 'local government'. So they're responsible for for things like the services in your area, the parks, waste removal etc. Anything that affects your local area is most likely decided by your council. So the votes you see plastered on the news right now are for people choosing those councillors.

MPs are the elected officials who represent an area on the national stage. They're the ones who end up in Government, in opposition etc.

As for issues, it depends. If it's something relatively small then yeah you could just go to your council. MPs are often a lot busier as they're often in Parliament, and it's quite hit or miss as to whether you get an MP who is dedicated to the constituency, or is quite rubbish. Councillors will always be for the local area so would be more reliable.
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SamKent19
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(Original post by MrDystopia)
A government could try to govern as a minority. This happened in the February 1974 election (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United..._February_1974) where Labour couldn't win a majority, nor form a coalition. Ultimately these don't really work well and so they ended up calling a second general election that year in October.



Councillors are people elected to take part in 'local government'. So they're responsible for for things like the services in your area, the parks, waste removal etc. Anything that affects your local area is most likely decided by your council. So the votes you see plastered on the news right now are for people choosing those councillors.

MPs are the elected officials who represent an area on the national stage. They're the ones who end up in Government, in opposition etc.

As for issues, it depends. If it's something relatively small then yeah you could just go to your council. MPs are often a lot busier as they're often in Parliament, and it's quite hit or miss as to whether you get an MP who is dedicated to the constituency, or is quite rubbish. Councillors will always be for the local area so would be more reliable.
Oh right, that makes sense now. In our area, there was no elections this year. Do you know why that may be?
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MrDystopia
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(Original post by ReadySalted28)
Oh right, that makes sense now. In our area, there was no elections this year. Do you know why that may be?
Local elections are staggered, so they don't all happen at once. There's usually some local elections every year for different areas of the UK. As an example, next year (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...lections,_2019) there's 270 local councils in England, all 11 councils in Northern Island, and 5 mayoral elections. London won't have any till 2022 now.
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SamKent19
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(Original post by MrDystopia)
Local elections are staggered, so they don't all happen at once. There's usually some local elections every year for different areas of the UK. As an example, next year (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United...lections,_2019) there's 270 local councils in England, all 11 councils in Northern Island, and 5 mayoral elections. London won't have any till 2022 now.
Cool, deffo makes much more sense now. Thanks for ur help.
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L i b
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(Original post by a_british_pie)
Thank you for this info! And what happens if no party wants to form either a coalition government or a confidence or supply deal. Would there have to be another general election held?
Ultimately a Prime Minister and a government stays in office until another is appointed. Theoretically, the existing government from before the election would stay in office until they decided they couldn't effectively govern. Again, in theory, a minority government can continue to exist if it makes agreements with other parties to support individual pieces of legislation - the budget is the most important. In reality, yes, that sort of arrangement wouldn't last and there'd probably be another election eventually. That said, the Fixed Terms Parliament Act makes that more difficult than it used to be.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by a_british_pie)
Who would win? Would the queen choose? If there is no majority?
If both parties had equal seats then in current times Corbyn would likely betray the union and form a coalition or confidence and supply agreement with the Nationalists.

If no coalition bar Con-Lab could achieve a majority then the incumbent executive would continue to govern using prerogative powers and passing the occasional bill with Labour support until another election took place/they could change leader. This in reality would mean a few bits of hippy dippy stuff they agreed on (equalities) but probably no money bills with an election after 6 months (3 months to change leaders, then a reasonable amount of time).

In Belgium the later scenario occurred and they were without an official government for 18 months. The incumbent was simply appointed as caretaker PM until they finally broke the deadlock.

A second election historically favours the opposition in terms of preventing the incumbent getting a majority although 1966 is an exception (Wilson went for a second election and won a large majority). There are not a lot of examples in the UK though (1951 saw a second election with Churchill winning, 1966 i mentioned, 1974 saw Labour closer to a majority, 2017 although not caused by a weak 2015 result as opposed to the three other results resulted in a loss of majority).
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bob072
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(Original post by a_british_pie)
Thank you.
And what is the other parties who they try to form a coalition with don't want to join? And they are still left with no majority?

Current government would continue unless they lose a vote of confidence. If the opposition then is asked to form a government and loses confidence vote, there would likely be a general election.
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ByEeek
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(Original post by ed98)
Depends on the other parties. Labour would probably form a minority or coalition government with the SNP and possibly the Greens and/or Lib Dems.
Same goes for the Tories.
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