foeglass
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Does anyone have any good methods for revising quotes for the AQA power and conflict poems as I'm pretty stuck?
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Katieb1232002
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Have used flash cards with all of the key information on them. I am really struggling on the comparisons
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Katieb1232002
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Go on the get revising sight and search what you want and it will probably come up. That is what i did
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foeglass
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(Original post by Katieb1232002)
Have used flash cards with all of the key information on them. I am really struggling on the comparisons
Thanks that's a great idea and yeah same I can't compare them that easily
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Katieb1232002
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Do you have a list of comparisons
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Also searched the poem and key quotes came up for it this also works for the book quotes. What texts are you studying. I am doing Macbeth, an inspector calls and a Christmas Carol
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foeglass
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no I don't, but I think gcse pod and mr bruff's english on youtube will have something to do with comparison
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foeglass
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An inspector calls, Romeo and Juliet and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
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Katieb1232002
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Thanks
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RebmaKopy
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(Original post by Katieb1232002)
Have used flash cards with all of the key information on them. I am really struggling on the comparisons
Do mindmaps with both the poems and make the comparisons.
If you dont prefer that and want an actual example; checkout Stacey Reay she makes good points on how to compare with level 7,8,9 comparisons.
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lolitaellul
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DONT waste time learning all of them, only learn the first 5-6 as they have all the main themes. however know which poem goes with which e.g. ozymandias and my last duchess as they both have the theme of tyrannical power etc. learn about 10 quotations for each maybe less and watch mr bruff for comparisons- for practice maybe write essay question plans or do a question and give it to your teacher to mark
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itslibby
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(Original post by Katieb1232002)
Have used flash cards with all of the key information on them. I am really struggling on the comparisons
Watch some of Mr Bruff's comparison videos on YouTube, I found them so helpful last year!
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somebrick
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(Original post by itslibby)
Watch some of Mr Bruff's comparison videos on YouTube, I found them so helpful last year!
what did you get if you dont mind me asking?
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itslibby
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(Original post by somebrick)
what did you get if you dont mind me asking?
In English lit? An 8
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somebrick
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(Original post by itslibby)
In English lit? An 8
wow, that's great. did you memorise quotes for every poem in the anthology?
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itslibby
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(Original post by somebrick)
wow, that's great. did you memorise quotes for every poem in the anthology?
I knew a few quotes and a few structural features from every poem (I knew more for some than I did others). Rather than learning masses of quotes I tried my best to learn some detailed analysis for a few from each poem so that I could make sure I included in depth analysis in the exam because I knew that I'd be super stressed in the exam as it were, so by going in with some idea of what I would write about each quote/structural technique helped me to relax a bit and then once I started writing what I had revised, more ideas flowed (I'm not sure if that makes any sense). I also made essay plans for possible comparisons (often using Mr Bruff's comparisons, although he hadn't done them for all of the poems by the time I did my exam) making sure that I had an idea of how to compare the structure and language techniques that the different poets used. Being able to talk about structure as well as language is key because most students will just write about language techniques so this already puts you ahead of many. However, don't fall into the trap of just writing something like 'this poem has a cyclical structure' and leaving it at that, you MUST identify the significance of every technique you write about and you should ALWAYS link everything back to the question. Hope this is helpfulFeel free to PM me if you have any question, or just quote me on here.
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somebrick
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(Original post by itslibby)
I knew a few quotes and a few structural features from every poem (I knew more for some than I did others). Rather than learning masses of quotes I tried my best to learn some detailed analysis for a few from each poem so that I could make sure I included in depth analysis in the exam because I knew that I'd be super stressed in the exam as it were, so by going in with some idea of what I would write about each quote/structural technique helped me to relax a bit and then once I started writing what I had revised, more ideas flowed (I'm not sure if that makes any sense). I also made essay plans for possible comparisons (often using Mr Bruff's comparisons, although he hadn't done them for all of the poems by the time I did my exam) making sure that I had an idea of how to compare the structure and language techniques that the different poets used. Being able to talk about structure as well as language is key because most students will just write about language techniques so this already puts you ahead of many. However, don't fall into the trap of just writing something like 'this poem has a cyclical structure' and leaving it at that, you MUST identify the significance of every technique you write about and you should ALWAYS link everything back to the question. Hope this is helpfulFeel free to PM me if you have any question, or just quote me on here.
Yeah absolutely. Currently, I think, I just rush when I'm writing, my handwriting goes scruffy because of the pressure, and I just write quotes before I start my essay. I think for the actual GCSE, I'll start by writing a plan so I can structure my argument. Which texts did you study for LIT?
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itslibby
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Macbeth, Jekyll and Hyde, An Inspector Calls & Power and Conflict poetry
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RebmaKopy
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(Original post by itslibby)
I knew a few quotes and a few structural features from every poem (I knew more for some than I did others). Rather than learning masses of quotes I tried my best to learn some detailed analysis for a few from each poem so that I could make sure I included in depth analysis in the exam because I knew that I'd be super stressed in the exam as it were, so by going in with some idea of what I would write about each quote/structural technique helped me to relax a bit and then once I started writing what I had revised, more ideas flowed (I'm not sure if that makes any sense). I also made essay plans for possible comparisons (often using Mr Bruff's comparisons, although he hadn't done them for all of the poems by the time I did my exam) making sure that I had an idea of how to compare the structure and language techniques that the different poets used. Being able to talk about structure as well as language is key because most students will just write about language techniques so this already puts you ahead of many. However, don't fall into the trap of just writing something like 'this poem has a cyclical structure' and leaving it at that, you MUST identify the significance of every technique you write about and you should ALWAYS link everything back to the question. Hope this is helpfulFeel free to PM me if you have any question, or just quote me on here.
If you dont mind me asking; could you like upload images of those comparisons of the essay planning, cuz currently I dont know how to essay plan, let alone structure an essay
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Katieb1232002
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(Original post by itslibby)
I knew a few quotes and a few structural features from every poem (I knew more for some than I did others). Rather than learning masses of quotes I tried my best to learn some detailed analysis for a few from each poem so that I could make sure I included in depth analysis in the exam because I knew that I'd be super stressed in the exam as it were, so by going in with some idea of what I would write about each quote/structural technique helped me to relax a bit and then once I started writing what I had revised, more ideas flowed (I'm not sure if that makes any sense). I also made essay plans for possible comparisons (often using Mr Bruff's comparisons, although he hadn't done them for all of the poems by the time I did my exam) making sure that I had an idea of how to compare the structure and language techniques that the different poets used. Being able to talk about structure as well as language is key because most students will just write about language techniques so this already puts you ahead of many. However, don't fall into the trap of just writing something like 'this poem has a cyclical structure' and leaving it at that, you MUST identify the significance of every technique you write about and you should ALWAYS link everything back to the question. Hope this is helpfulFeel free to PM me if you have any question, or just quote me on here.
Cod you have a list of the comparisons you used
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