What proof do i need for my driving test if im in my own car?

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george_xeno
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I am going to do my driving test in my own car however on the DVLA it states that i need:
"Proof you need to bring to your test
You must bring proof that says one of the following:

the car was recalled and the recall work has been done
the car was recalled but didn’t need any work to be done
the car wasn’t part of the recall

The proof must be either:
the recall letter or safety notice, stamped by the manufacturer or dealer
on official or headed notepaper from the manufacturer or a dealer"

Does any one know what this means?
Does a MOT certificate count?

Thanks
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AngryJellyfish
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Moved to Learning to drive.
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EvilShubunkin
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https://www.gov.uk/driving-test/using-your-own-car

If your car is one of the ones listed under the section "Cars with known safety faults" you would then need to take the required proof - as listed on the website - that the recall work has been completed and the car is safe. If it's not listed then there's no issue and the examiner wouldn't check - they don't know what car is yours until you take them out to it. A MOT certificate would not be proof as the recall issue may not be something tested as part of the MOT.

The main thing you need to check with your insurance company is that you are insured for the driving test, as the examiner is not a supervising driver but simply an observer - there is no requirement for the examiner to step in and prevent any damage or accident (although most would as far as they can in a car with no dual controls).
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george_xeno
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(Original post by EvilShubunkin)
https://www.gov.uk/driving-test/using-your-own-car

If your car is one of the ones listed under the section "Cars with known safety faults" you would then need to take the required proof - as listed on the website - that the recall work has been completed and the car is safe. If it's not listed then there's no issue and the examiner wouldn't check - they don't know what car is yours until you take them out to it. A MOT certificate would not be proof as the recall issue may not be something tested as part of the MOT.

The main thing you need to check with your insurance company is that you are insured for the driving test, as the examiner is not a supervising driver but simply an observer - there is no requirement for the examiner to step in and prevent any damage or accident (although most would as far as they can in a car with no dual controls).
So as my car isnt listen on the cars with known safety faults sections (Ford KA) i dont have to bring any proof correct?
Is there any other document i would need to bring?
Under my provisional insurance wouldnt it cover my car being used with a driving examiner as they are (probably) over the age of 21 with a driving licence?
Obviously i will call to check.
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EvilShubunkin
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(Original post by george_xeno)
So as my car isnt listen on the cars with known safety faults sections (Ford KA) i dont have to bring any proof correct?
Is there any other document i would need to bring?
Under my provisional insurance wouldnt it cover my car being used with a driving examiner as they are (probably) over the age of 21 with a driving licence?
Obviously i will call to check.
That's right - I've never had an examiner ask about a car when pupil's have taken their own. Would only be questioned if they're one of the ones listed.

As for insurance, the examiner isn't driving your car and isn't supervising, which is why the insurance company need to confirm that you're covered to take the test. You don't need to take any proof of that as you sign the declaration on the test report to confirm that the car is insured for the driving test.
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george_xeno
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(Original post by EvilShubunkin)
That's right - I've never had an examiner ask about a car when pupil's have taken their own. Would only be questioned if they're one of the ones listed.

As for insurance, the examiner isn't driving your car and isn't supervising, which is why the insurance company need to confirm that you're covered to take the test. You don't need to take any proof of that as you sign the declaration on the test report to confirm that the car is insured for the driving test.
It also states i need to get a interior rear-view mirror. is there any specific criteria or model mirror mirror?
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suzysues
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(Original post by george_xeno)
It also states i need to get a interior rear-view mirror. is there any specific criteria or model mirror mirror?
You can get one with a suction cup, readily available in Halfords (other car accessory shops are available). No specific requirements on type.

Please do not listen to anyone who says that you don't need to take one! You could risk it, but if the test centre has already used, lost, broken theirs, then your test will not go ahead. It's just not worth the risk.
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george_xeno
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(Original post by suzysues)
You can get one with a suction cup, readily available in Halfords (other car accessory shops are available). No specific requirements on type.

Please do not listen to anyone who says that you don't need to take one! You could risk it, but if the test centre has already used, lost, broken theirs, then your test will not go ahead. It's just not worth the risk.
Thank you so much!
One last question (sorry to be bothering you)

If i call up my insurance company tomorrow and they tell me its not covered for a test, am i able to buy this cover and is it expensive? thanks again
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suzysues
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(Original post by george_xeno)
Thank you so much!
One last question (sorry to be bothering you)

If i call up my insurance company tomorrow and they tell me its not covered for a test, am i able to buy this cover and is it expensive? thanks again
I'm sorry. I have no idea on this. It must be readily available, as many people have it, and your insurance company probably wouldn't want to lose the business :-) They are the best people to ask.

Good luck on your test!
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IWMTom
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(Original post by EvilShubunkin)
The main thing you need to check with your insurance company is that you are insured for the driving test, as the examiner is not a supervising driver but simply an observer - there is no requirement for the examiner to step in and prevent any damage or accident (although most would as far as they can in a car with no dual controls).
This is a load of old - for lack of a better word - excrement.

(Original post by george_xeno)
Thank you so much!
One last question (sorry to be bothering you)

If i call up my insurance company tomorrow and they tell me its not covered for a test, am i able to buy this cover and is it expensive? thanks again
Ignore the above poster - if you've got provisional insurance on your car, you are of course covered to do your test. Just bear in mind that should you pass, your insurance is no longer valid, so you need to sort insurance out before driving away, or have someone else who is insured to drive other vehicles drive you home.
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EvilShubunkin
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(Original post by IWMTom)
This is a load of old - for lack of a better word - excrement.



Ignore the above poster - if you've got provisional insurance on your car, you are of course covered to do your test. Just bear in mind that should you pass, your insurance is no longer valid, so you need to sort insurance out before driving away, or have someone else who is insured to drive other vehicles drive you home.
Well as you seem to know what insurance policy they do have, we'll go with your word rather than the insurance company.
For the sake of a 5 minute call, surely it's worth checking it's covered, if it's not obvious in the policy documents.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by EvilShubunkin)
Well as you seem to know what insurance policy they do have, we'll go with your word rather than the insurance company.
For the sake of a 5 minute call, surely it's worth checking it's covered, if it's not obvious in the policy documents.
I don't know what planet you live on, but why on earth would an insurance policy not cover a policyholder for driving the car...?

The only requirement is that they drive in accordance with their licence, i.e. be supervised by someone that meets the requirements, as an examiner does.

Feel free to show us all an insurance policy that WOULDN'T cover someone for a driving test, because the logic in that is utterly broken.
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EvilShubunkin
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(Original post by IWMTom)
I don't know what planet you live on, but why on earth would an insurance policy not cover a policyholder for driving the car...?

The only requirement is that they drive in accordance with their licence, i.e. be supervised by someone that meets the requirements, as an examiner does.

Feel free to show us all an insurance policy that WOULDN'T cover someone for a driving test, because the logic in that is utterly broken.
Majority of policies will say you should be driving in accordance with the licence. Which for a provisional licence holder is supervised by someone over 21 and held licence for 3+ years for that category.

A driving examiner is not a supervising driver, they are an observer.

Direct from the DVSA: A driving examiner is not there to supervise a learner driver during their test, as they are observing and assessing the learner's skills (regulation 16 of the Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) Regulations 1999).

So it could be argued that during the driving test the learner is not being supervised, they are being observed, and therefore not driving in accordance with the provisional licence which an insurance company COULD use to wriggle out of any claim being made.

As I said, for the sake of a 5 minute call to get it on record that it's covered, why wouldn't you double check?
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IWMTom
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(Original post by EvilShubunkin)
Majority of policies will say you should be driving in accordance with the licence. Which for a provisional licence holder is supervised by someone over 21 and held licence for 3+ years for that category.

A driving examiner is not a supervising driver, they are an observer.

Direct from the DVSA: A driving examiner is not there to supervise a learner driver during their test, as they are observing and assessing the learner's skills (regulation 16 of the Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) Regulations 1999).

So it could be argued that during the driving test the learner is not being supervised, they are being observed, and therefore not driving in accordance with the provisional licence which an insurance company COULD use to wriggle out of any claim being made.

As I said, for the sake of a 5 minute call to get it on record that it's covered, why wouldn't you double check?
You're taking the legislature for the definition of "driving in accordance with a licence" too literally - if what you are saying were true, any learner driver taking their test is liable to receive an LC20 if pulled by the police!

Don't be so silly, there isn't a single insurance policy for learner drivers out there that doesn't cover a driving test - fact.
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EvilShubunkin
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(Original post by IWMTom)
You're taking the legislature for the definition of "driving in accordance with a licence" too literally - if what you are saying were true, any learner driver taking their test is liable to receive an LC20 if pulled by the police!

Don't be so silly, there isn't a single insurance policy for learner drivers out there that doesn't cover a driving test - fact.
OK, if you want to break it down further.

"Any learner driver taking their test is laible to receive an LC20.." - not if they're in their instructor's car as that car IS definitely insured for tests.
"Policy for learner drivers" - if you're talking about specific products for learner driver insurance that sit separate to parent's policies, then I would agree that they should be covered for a driving test.
Adding little Johnny onto the parent's existing insurance, that's where the grey area comes in.

I think we'll need to agree to disagree. I know what I'll continue advising my learners to do if they want to take the test in their own car, it's not been a problem for them to get that confirmation.

The OP asked what he needed to check, if he's paranoid about making sure everything is correct then he is best advised to check with his insurance company. Fact as you would say.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by EvilShubunkin)
OK, if you want to break it down further.

"Any learner driver taking their test is laible to receive an LC20.." - not if they're in their instructor's car as that car IS definitely insured for tests.
"Policy for learner drivers" - if you're talking about specific products for learner driver insurance that sit separate to parent's policies, then I would agree that they should be covered for a driving test.
Adding little Johnny onto the parent's existing insurance, that's where the grey area comes in.

I think we'll need to agree to disagree. I know what I'll continue advising my learners to do if they want to take the test in their own car, it's not been a problem for them to get that confirmation.

The OP asked what he needed to check, if he's paranoid about making sure everything is correct then he is best advised to check with his insurance company. Fact as you would say.
LC20 has nothing to do with insurance; it's the penalty code for driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence - i.e. driving on a provisional licence without a supervising driver, which you say an examiner is not.
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suzysues
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OP, also remember that when you pass, your insurance will no longer be valid, so don't go driving home again! :-)
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paul-wba
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If the car went into a dealership for recall work, just ask them for a official letterheaded printout confirmation that the work was carried out. Make sure they stamp it.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by paul-wba)
If the car went into a dealership for recall work, just ask them for a official letterheaded printout confirmation that the work was carried out. Make sure they stamp it.
This thread is two years old...
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